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Ships Monthly

Ships Monthly June 2020

Ships Monthly is the world’s number one shipping magazine and Britain’s best-selling monthly magazine for ship lovers. Read by seafarers and enthusiasts all over the world, it contains a unique mix of shipping and maritime news, broken down by ship type, with sections focussing on ferries, cruise ships, warships, preserved vessels, tugs and cargo ships. The features, written by experts in their field, cover ships old and new, historic shipping companies and their vessels, modern cruise liners and passenger ferries, warships and naval vessels, profiles of docks and harbours in the UK and around the world, and personal accounts of voyages on ships round the world. Every issue contains an interview with the captain of a ship. In addition to the latest happenings in the shipping industry, the Ship of the Month feature goes behind the scenes on a significant ship to give readers an all-round insight into the world of ships and shipping.

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Land:
United Kingdom
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
Kelsey Publishing Group
Erscheinungsweise:
Monthly
AUSGABE KAUFEN
3,97 €(Inkl. MwSt.)
ABONNIEREN
32,75 €(Inkl. MwSt.)
12 Ausgaben

in dieser ausgabe

1 Min.
two decades at ships monthly

The beginning of May marked two decades of my involvement with Ships Monthly, having started as Assistant Editor at the office in Burton-on-Trent in May 2000. Not only have magazines changed since then, but so has the world of shipping, with bigger and more technologically advanced ships, built to operate more efficiently and meet the new environmental standards. However, nothing in the 20 years I have been reading and writing about ships is comparable to the situation which we are currently witnessing. The mass lay-up of cruise ships is unprecedented, and we have details of where the ships are in Cruise news on page 14. The situation in the ferry industry is just as challenging, as reported on page 12. Although some ferries continue to operate, many others are laid up,…

1 Min.
contributors this month

Roy Fenton Roy Fenton grew up on Merseyside, developing his interest in shipping. His speciality is cargo ships from the ‘golden age’, which he says ended about 1970. Mark Nicolson Mark Nicolson is a lifelong Caledonian MacBrayne ferry enthusiast, and has photographed and travelled on many of the vessels in their fleet. Stephen Payne Stephen Payne is a naval architect, best known for designing Queen Mary 2. He is a past President of the Royal Institution of Naval Architects. David Brown David Brown worked in the marine industry, spending 33 years at sea and 15 years ashore; he retired with the rank of Commodore. Ships Monthly on Facebook REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS Andrew & Donna Cooke Roy Cressey • Gary Davies Roy Fenton • William Mayes Russell Plummer • Jim Shaw Conrad Waters SUBSCRIBE TO SHIPS MONTHLY See page 20 Kelsey Media takes your…

1 Min.
brief news

RO-PAX CONVERTED • The Ro-Pax ferry Splendid, operated by Italy’s Grandi Navi Veloci, has been converted into a temporary hospital ship at Genoa to accommodate coronavirus patients requiring ‘protected discharge’ while they are recovering from the disease. The conversion was carried out with assistance from Italian classification society RINA. JS WORLD’S LARGEST SHIP • The world’s largest ship, the decommissioning vessel Pioneering Spirit, is to be fitted with a new Jacket Lift System (JLS) being fabricated in Italy and China which will allow it to lift and install ‘jackets’, the steel frames supporting the decks of offshore oil platforms weighing up to 20,000 tonnes. The new system will make use of two 170m lifting beams, and special upending machinery will allow the work to be accomplished in a single move. JS WESTERN…

5 Min.
waterfront

STEEL CUT FOR ICE-CLASS RO-ROS LNG-FUELLED Although the Coronavirus outbreak closed China’s shipyards for several weeks earlier this year, the CIMC Raffles facility at Yantai has been able to start construction of what will be the world’s largest LNG-fuelled ice-classed ro-ro vessels. To be operated by WALLENIUS SOL, which was formed last year by Svenska Orient Linien and Wallenius Lines, the twin ships will measure 241.7m by 35.2m and feature 5,800 lane metres of deck space for vehicles. Both will meet Finnish-Swedish ice class 1A Super requirements and will be equipped with two Type C LNG tanks with a capacity of 685m3 each. Designed by Denmark’s Knud E. Hansen, the first of the 20-knot vessels is to be delivered by August next year, with a further two ships held on option. JS WÄRTSILÄ DESIGN…

1 Min.
ferry extras

NEW CHINESE FERRY • Chinese ferry operator Bohay Ferry Group expects to take delivery of the recently launched overnight ferry Zhong Hua Fu Qiang from compatriot builder Huanghai Shipbuilding by the end of this year. Originally ordered by Weihai Haida Co as Sheng Sheng 3, but taken over by Bohay following its investment in Weihai Haida, the 37,000gt ship has a capacity for 2,300 passengers and 2,600 lane metres of vehicle deck space. She follows the larger Zhong Hua Fu Qing, a 212m by 28.6m vessel with a capacity for 2,000 passengers and 3,000 lane metres which was completed by Huanghai Shipbuilding for Bohay last year. JS IRISH SEA DISPUTE • Covid-19 apart, P&O were also in dispute with Mersey Docks and Harbour Company over fees for the use of their…

5 Min.
shipping’s brave new world

COVID-19 CRISIS The outbreak and spread of Covid-19 around the world has impacted shipping to various degrees and the immediate future for most sectors looks bleak. The cruise industry has been particularly hard hit, with all ships, well over 400, out of operation and laid up at a cost expected to total more than $1 billion (see pages 14-15). Carnival Corporation alone, with more than 100 vessels under its various brands, is estimating a ‘hot’ layup cost of between $2 and $3 million per ship per month, while nearly full crews are kept on board. And even moving to a ‘warm’ layup, with reduced crews, is proving difficult because of port, border and air travel restrictions, forcing some lines to employ their own vessels for repatriation work. CRUISE SHIPS LAID UP By late April…