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Story of the American Civil War

Story of the American Civil War

Story of the American Civil War

On 12 April 1861, the first shots of the American Civil War were fired at Fort Sumter in what would become the bloodiest war in American history. In just four years more than 600,000 men were killed. In the Story of the American Civil War we explore the origins of the conflict, including the divisive issue of slavery, Northern attempts to preserve the Union and Southern demands for autonomy. In-depth features on the conflict’s major battles reveal the true horror of the war, while battle maps help bring the likes of Antietam and Gettysburg to life. In addition, we discover the key players of the American Civil War, the role played by African-Americans and the harsh realities of life in the prisoner-of-war camps. While the war may have ended in 1865 after four years of bloody fighting, the United States remained bitterly divided for many years. We explore the Reconstruction era and attempts to heal wounds, the impact of the conflict on American history and how the repercussions are still being felt today.

Land:
United Kingdom
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
Future Publishing Ltd
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1 Min.
story of the american civil war

On 12 April 1861, the first shots of the American Civil War were fired at Fort Sumter in what would become the bloodiest war in American history. In just four years more than 600,000 men were killed. In the Story of the American Civil War we explore the origins of the conflict, including the divisive issue of slavery, Northern attempts to preserve the Union and Southern demands for autonomy. In-depth features on the conflict’s major battles reveal the true horror of the war, while battle maps help bring the likes of Antietam and Gettysburg to life. In addition, we discover the key players of the American Civil War, the role played by African-Americans and the harsh realities of life in the prisoner-of-war camps. While the war may have ended in…

2 Min.
story of the american civil war

Future PLC Richmond House, 33 Richmond Hill, Bournemouth, Dorset, BH2 6EZ Editorial Editor Dan Peel Editorial Director Jon White Senior Art Editor Andy Downes Cover images Wiki, Getty Photography All copyrights and trademarks are recognised and respected Advertising Media packs are available on request Commercial Director Clare Dove clare.dove@futurenet.com International Head of Print Licensing Rachel Shaw licensing@futurenet.com Circulation Head of Newstrade Tim Mathers Production Head of Production Mark Constance Production Project Manager Clare Scott Advertising Production Manager Joanne Crosby Digital Editions Controller Jason Hudson Production Managers Keely Miller, Nola Cokely, Vivienne Calvert, Fran Twentyman Management Chief Content Officer Aaron Asadi Commercial Finance Director Dan Jotcham Head of Art & Design Greg Whitaker Printed by William Gibbons, 26 Planetary Road, Willenhall, West Midlands, WV13 3XT Distributed by Marketforce, 5 Churchill Place, Canary Wharf, London, E14 5HU www.marketforce.co.uk Tel: 0203 787 9001 The Story of the American Civil War © 2019 Future Publishing Limited We are committed to only using magazine paper which…

9 Min.
timeline of the american civil war

FORT SUMTER UNDER FIRE 12 APRIL 1861 CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA At 4.30am, Confederate artillery batteries ringing Charleston Harbor open fire on Fort Sumter, situated on a sandbar about a mile from the heart of the city’s wharf area. After repeated calls for the surrender of the fort are declined, Confederate general PGT Beauregard orders the 34-hour bombardment to commence. Major Robert Anderson, commanding the Union garrison, surrenders the following day and is proclaimed a hero. The opening shots of the Civil War electrify the American population both North and South. SOUTH CAROLINA SECEDES 20 DECEMBER 1860 CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA Prompted by the election of Republican Abraham Lincoln as the 16th president of the United States, South Carolina adopts an ordinance of secession in Charleston following the unanimous 169-0 vote of the state assembly in Columbia…

5 Min.
the birth of america

The first successful British settlement in the New World was at Jamestown, Virginia, founded in 1607. This was followed a few years later by the Pilgrim settlement at Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1620. British North America would become peopled by a diverse group of settlers drawn from around the British Isles and beyond. In New England, the Puritans predominated, while in Virginia’s Tidewater country, society was dominated by the cavalier aristocracy coming from southern England. The Thirteen Colonies were mostly peopled in a series of four great migrations from different parts of Britain and Ireland. The earliest of the big waves was that of the Puritans, originating mainly in East Anglia in the first half of the 17th century. The next wave was that of Royalists of southern England who sailed to…

2 Min.
the french and indian war

In America, the Seven Years’ War was known as the French and Indian War. The bone of contention in North America was over the western lands of the interior, to which both Britain and France had laid claim. English settlers had penetrated into the Ohio Valley and had even reached the Mississippi River by the middle of the 18th century. To safeguard the route between French Canada and Louisiana, far to the south on the Gulf of Mexico, the French constructed several forts, at Presque Isle, Rouillé, Duquesne and Le Boeuf. These were meant to stop the British going any further west. Troops from colonial Virginia, commanded by future American president George Washington, were despatched to build Fort Necessity near to Fort Duquesne in 1754, but this operation miscarried badly and…

9 Min.
america wins its independence

The American Revolution was the outcome of a long process of estrangement between Britain and her American colonists. To many Americans, the crux of the problem was King George III’s failure to respect their rights as Englishmen. The high-handed actions of the royal ministers, especially the imposition of taxes on the colonists in contravention of traditional rights – taxation without representation – were extremely annoying. From the perspective of the Crown, as well as many other Britons besides, the royal demand that colonists pay their share of the costs of their own defence was only fair and proper. Still, there was no sense in the 1760s and early 1770s that the bonds between Crown and subjects were irretrievably broken. Britain was the ‘Mother Country’, the ethnic wellspring of the greater part…