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Haus & Garten
The English Garden

The English Garden

June 2020

Enjoy over 60 beautiful gardens a year with The English Garden. Every issue features country, city, cottage and coastal gardens, with advice on how to recreate them. Be inspired by articles written by the country's top garden designers and discover the best plant varieties for your garden, chosen by expert nurserymen and plantspeople.

Land:
United Kingdom
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
Chelsea Magazine
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1 Min.
contributors

Sue Bradley Sue has been a garden writer for almost half of her 30-year career in journalism. She has a hilltop allotment near Stroud and plays the violin. She tells the stories of families who’ve restored lost gardens on page 125. Max Crisfield Max is a professional gardener, currently working in a private garden in West Sussex, and a writer for the national press and leading garden magazines. He reveals how Parham revamped its borders on page 97. Caroline Beck Caroline writes about gardens from her home in the North Pennines and grows cut flowers for weddings in a walled garden near Durham (@verdeflowerco on Instagram). She visits Havoc Hall on page 66. IMAGES MATTHEW ANDREWS; NEIL HEPWORTH; ANDREW HIGGINS; ERIKA SYKES…

1 Min.
welcome

When I last wrote this column the blossom on the cherry tree opposite my window was just starting to fall, turning the kerbside pink with petals. Now, four weeks later, it’s in full leaf, as are the lime and ash trees that overlook the back garden. Everything grows so quickly at this time of year. Everywhere you look, there’s swift change to discover: sweet peas halfway up their obelisk already; a clump of bleeding heart twice the size it was last week; potatoes that need earthing up, again! Thank heavens we can seek out these small yet life-affirming joys in our gardens while we endure uncertain times in the world at large. To quote Alan Titchmarsh, with whom we chat on page 141: “Plants and gardens anchor us to the…

2 Min.
people to meet

Joy Larkcom The author and respected vegetable garden maker discusses her approach to edible gardening I never liked using chemicals, but my Damascus moment came when spraying tar oil wash on apple trees in our Suffolk garden, my baby in his pram behind me. I turned to see him covered with black tar spots. I’ve never sprayed since. The key to organic gardening is to build up soil fertility. Perhaps you need to accept you may not be able to grow everything. I don’t grow aubergines, for example, because I find it so hard to control red spider mite. It was being commissioned to write Vegetables from Small Gardens that stimulated my interest in traditional intensive peasant systems and led to ‘The Grand Vegetable Tour’ – the year my husband and I spent travelling…

2 Min.
places to shop

Perennials by POST Woottens of Wenhaston Suffolk This nursery has been established in rural Suffolk for 25 years and has one of the largest collections of herbaceous hardy perennials in East Anglia. It also specialises in bearded iris, hemerocallis, auriculas, pelargoniums and hardy geraniums. All plants are grown and propagated on site following a strict ‘Green Policy’. Woottens runs an efficient mail order service all year round. Tel: 01502 478258; woottensplants.com SEEDS to go Sea Spring Seeds West Dorset Find the seeds of reliable, productive and good-tasting vegetable varieties for the home and allotment gardener at this independent nursery near Dorchester. Sea Spring Seeds has been selling vegetables to local and national markets since 1989, and its collection includes the seeds of herbs, edible flowers, kohlrabi and oriental leaves, as well as a good selection of more…

1 Min.
things to do

COLLECT hellebore seed They put on their enchanting show of flowers earlier on in spring – now it’s time to collect and sow their seed to produce even more plants By June the pretty flowers of hellebores will have faded to green or papery beige, and at their centre, seedpods should have formed. Left to their own devices, many hellebores will self-seed, the precious cargo of seeds falling out and seedlings appearing around the parent plant. If you’d like to be more deliberate about how your hellebores spread though, collect the seed when it’s ripe and rattling inside the pod. Hellebore seed should not be stored away. Seed loses its viability unless it’s sown fresh, so fill a seed tray with free-draining seed compost and sow straight away. Leave the tray in a…

1 Min.
checklist

• When young tomato plants produce their first truss of flowers, make sure they are in their final pots or planting positions. • Plant out tender bedding and unwrap exotics or move them outdoors now that the risk of frost has passed. • The earliest potatoes might be ready to harvest now. Investigate by unearthing a couple of tubers and seeing if they're a decent size. • Give evergreen hedges such as box or privet a trim: pruning box on Derby Day, in the first week of June, is the traditional gardening adage. • Keep sowing small batches of quick-growing salad leaves, radishes and lettuce, for a continual supply of crops throughout the summer months. IMAGES CLIVE NICHOLS; GAP/JONATHAN BUCKLEY; SHUTTERSTOCK…