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Reisen & Outdoor
Wilderness

Wilderness

March 2020

Each issue of Wilderness takes its readers to the most beautiful areas in New Zealand, whether by foot, mountain bike, sea kayak, raft, pony or dream.

Land:
New Zealand
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
Lifestyle Publishing Ltd
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12 Ausgaben

In dieser ausgabe

2 Min.
a great walk brings new hope

THERE’S OFTEN debate about whether tourism opportunities on the West Coast can replace the many good-paying jobs that have been lost in the extractive industries over the years. Perhaps the Paparoa Track Great Walk will provide a definitive answer. As we discover in our story, ‘More than just a track’ (p56), opportunities abound for those catering to the visitors who will go there to experience the new Great Walk. Punakaiki and Blackball, the two towns that bookend the track, are experiencing a kind of renaissance. People are moving to Blackball to open cafés and transport businesses. More people are visiting the towns, supporting existing businesses and strengthening the viability of these new enterprises. Accommodation providers are expanding their footprint to provide for more campers and motorhomes. Some people may never accept tourism will replace…

3 Min.
pigeon post

CONSERVATION THROUGH OUR LIFETIMES It was such a privilege to complete the Pureora Forest Timber Trail with two friends recently. Congratulations to DOC on a magnificent achievement, and to all those people who historically fought so hard for this forest to be saved. What an incredible asset for future generations of New Zealanders. I think New Zealand is well down the track of realising the meaning and importance of conservation. In future, conservation will drive our economy. Every decision – political, economic and social – will be driven by it. It will be factored into all of our day-to-day decisions at work, at home, and most importantly by the decision-makers of the day who determine our communities and the societies in which we live. I recently took Willow, my eldest mokopuna (she is eight…

2 Min.
letter of the month

HOW ‘DIFFICULT’ IS DIFFICULT? I am 73 years young and still enjoy tramping. However, I have one regret and that is that my fear of exposure on tricky bits has increased considerably. Thus, a few years ago I had to turn back before the summit of Mt Owen, which a friend describes as a “nice walk” when my fear stopped me amongst the limestone crevasses. We often use Sven Brabyn’s books to guide us and we have found that if he says a track is ‘hard’ or even ‘moderate hard’ I can no longer cope with what we will find. Wilderness uses the word ‘difficult’ instead of ‘hard’ but I had assumed there would be some correlation with Brabyn’s ratings, but I’ve been completely staggered to find the St Arnaud Range Tarns (‘The…

1 Min.
your trips, your pix

Get your photo published here to receive a SOL survival blanket worth $19.80. It weighs only 100g, but will reflect 90% of radiated body heat. Learn more about SOL at e.ampro.co.nz. Last Weekend submission criteria can be found at wildernessmag.co.nz…

6 Min.
walk shorts

WEATHER BOMB CLOSES Routeburn indefinitely WITH THE TRACK closed ahead and washed away behind, Dave How had no choice but to hunker down at Mackenzie Hut. He and 10 others had left Routeburn Falls Hut at around 10am on February 3, tramping through torrential rain, lightning and thunder, which rumbled through the valleys. Their rainwear had soaked through, but spirits were high – despite the weather, the hut ranger had said conditions weren’t expected to exceed dangerous levels, and they were enjoying the moody atmosphere. Nobody expected the Routeburn Track would be closed indefinitely from that day. How knew rain was forecast, but its ferocity took everybody by surprise. “When we checked in with DOC at the start of the track to see if we could walk, we were told we wouldn’t know until we were…

2 Min.
the prizes

GRAND PRIZE A FOUR-DAY RABBIT PASS ALPINE TRAVERSE worth $2350 with Aspiring Guides Located in Mt Aspiring National Park, this four-day alpine crossing links two of the region's major river valleys. This spectacular area is surrounded by high glacier-covered peaks, waterfalls and lakes and is home to many rare and endangered species. You will not find a better way to experience the stunning alpine scenery of New Zealand, surrounded by unspoilt forests, alpine meadows, huge waterfalls and alpine lakes. An Aspiring Guides’ professional guide will help you safely explore this remote and seldom-visited area. Find out more at www.aspiringguides.com. SECOND PRIZE A TWO DAY BREWSTER GLACIER TREK worth $1480 with Adventure Consultants The Brewster Glacier Trek is a true alpine trekking adventure in Mt Aspiring National Park. Tucked into the eastern corner of park, the Brewster…