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Dirt Rag MagazineDirt Rag Magazine

Dirt Rag Magazine

Issue 212

Dirt Rag is a mountain biking lifestyle magazine. Original art, passionate stories, investigative articles, honest product reviews, comics, music and book reviews and a realistic attitude are what we're all about. Whether you are a timid beginner or a seasoned race junkie, Dirt Rag speaks to you.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Dirt Rag Magazine LTD
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4 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
dirt rag

PUBLISHER Maurice Tierney | publisher@dirtragmag.com SUPREME EDITORIALSHIP Carolyne Whelan | carolyne@dirtragmag.com VISUAL WARLOCK Stephen Haynes | stephen@dirtragmag.com DIGITAL STRATEGIST/ LEAD PHOTOGRAPHER Brett Rothmeyer | brett@dirtragmag.com OPERATIONS MANAGER Scott Williams | scott@dirtragmag.com ACCESS EDITOR Leslie Kehmeier | access@dirtragmag.com EVENTS COORDINATOR Trina Haynes | trina@dirtragmag.com ADVERTISING AND PARTNERSHIPS Ellen Butler | ellen@dirtragmag.com QUALITY MANAGER EMERITUS Karl Rosengarth | karl@dirtragmag.com CIRCULATION Jon Pratt | jon@dirtragmag.com COPY EDITOR Kim Stravers HOW TO CONTACT US 3483 Saxonburg Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA 15238 412.767.9910 - dirtragmag.com ADVERTISING SALES - 412.767.9910 advertise@dirtragmag.com SUBSCRIPTIONS - 866.523.9653 DRsubscriptions@dirtragmag.com DISTRIBUTION - 800.762.7617 sales@dirtragmag.com PARTNERSHIPS - 412.767.9910 partnerships@dirtragmag.com PRODUCT TESTING - 412.767.9910 stuff@dirtragmag.com LEGAL COUNSEL Marc Reisman, Esq. NEWSSTAND SALES Howard White NEWSSTAND DISTRIBUTION COMAG Marketing Group PRINTER Schumann Printers, Inc.…

access_time2 min.
snooze your own adventure

JUST ABOUT EVERY SUNDAY, I TRY TO MAKE IT TO MY FAVORITE BAR IN TOWN FOR THEIR STARVING ARTIST $7 VEGAN SUNDAY DINNER. My friends are the bartenders, the dinner is always different and some old movie is playing from the projector on silent while good jams croon through the PA. (It’s important to have at least some routine, I’ve been told.) This week, “Labyrinth” was on. There’s a scene in that movie where Sarah, the hero, has to choose which door to knock on, based on clues and logic. When she makes her choice, she finds herself in a vertical tunnel of hands asking her which way she wants to go: “Up or down?” While these choices were obvious and direct (and in a movie), life is also full…

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the love and the loss of bruce gordon

WHEN REFERRING TO PEOPLE WHO HAVE, TO SOME DEGREE OR ANOTHER, MADE AN INDELIBLE IMPACT ON A SCENE, THE TERM “LEGEND” GETS THROWN AROUND WITH SOME FREQUENCY. In the late Bruce Gordon’s case, from my perspective, that particular title doesn’t begin to truly cover the life he led. One of the founders of the wholly irreverent SOPWAMTOS (Society Of People Who Actually Make Their Own Shit), from the time he first lit a torch in the 1970s, the artistry of American frame-building was of vital importance to him. Besides being a meticulous craftsman, he set the stage for the following generation of bike-riding derelicts, myself included. It was always with a quick wit and a sharp tongue that he returned a greeting. He was always the first to downplay his…

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no pancakes for mothra

BZHIORT! I can still hear the buzzing sound in my ear, like the Great Gazoo appearing out of nowhere. But this time the sound came with a tingling sensation. I was hanging with my crew at the 24 Hours of Allamuchy #eastcoastrocks XC race in the summer of … 2000, maybe? It was the year before the year it started raining every year. The time Dale brought his dee-luxe Kamp Kitchen with canopy, cookstove and worktable. On the first night, I’m in there making my go-to meal for a crowd, dump-and-stir pasta tossed with a tub of pesto, can of tomatoes, jar of roasted peppers, jar of artichoke hearts, sun-dried tomato bits, pine nuts and fontina cheese. Everyone’s chilling in camp chairs, laughing, relaxed. I’m in the Kamp Kitchen having…

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carbonframes onyx

WALKING THE EXPO AT THIS SPRING’S DIRT FEST PENNSYLVANIA, I COULDN’T HELP BUT MARVEL AT ALL THE KILLER NEW BIKES ON DISPLAY. As a fan of vintage bikes, a vast majority of my experience with frame construction materials is constrained to steel, aluminum and titanium. Carbon fiber, at least as we know it today, was not widespread in the early days of mountain biking. Early attempts at composite bikes started coming on the scene with models like the 1987 Kestrel MXZ and the 1988 Trimble Carbon Cross. Those bikes were considered composite construction and, unlike today’s true carbon-fiber bikes, had fiberglass and other materials incorporated into the carbon weave, which was often applied over a core — foam for the MXZ and Douglas fir (yes, that’s a tree) for the…

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gunnison, colorado

NESTLED IN THE SHADOWS OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS ALONG HIGHWAY 50 SITS THE CITY OF GUNNISON, COLORADO. The town received its name in honor of United States Army General John W. Gunnison, who was sent to survey the land for the railroad. In the late 1800s, miners, ranchers and mountain men settled into Gunnison once the railroad had been established. Walking down Main Street, it’s easy to imagine the horses of yesteryear hitched to the posts outside of storefronts. The facades of the buildings have maintained their Old West charm, but where there once were horses, there now are bicycles. While Gunnison has held onto a fair amount of its ranching past, which is celebrated over 10 days each July during an event known as Cattlemen’s Days, much of the city…

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