EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Cars & Motorcycles
Dirt RiderDirt Rider

Dirt Rider June 2017

Get Dirt Rider digital magazine subscription today for dirt bike and off road bike reviews, riding tips and tricks, and the latest racing coverage.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Bonnier Corporation
Read Morekeyboard_arrow_down

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
meeting your hero

How many of you have met your childhood hero? When I was a kid I would get racer autographs on the backs of my dad’s business cards then tack them to a Bob Hannah poster I had on my wall. That poster had Hannah’s signature printed on it, but I never got his autograph. Then through the magic of working at Dirt Rider, about 10 years ago I met my hero, and I likely have met your hero too. A phone interview several years ago had me talking with Brad Lackey about a photo you see in this very issue. It’s a shot from the day he won his Motocross World Championship. He mentioned casually that it would be interesting to do a story with various champions on the day they…

access_time9 min.
haaker conquers king of the motos

The 2017 King of the Motos was nothing if not dramatic: injuries, penalties, night racing, and a totally new format. Although the event has been part of Ultra4’s King of the Hammers for several years, it’s safe to say there’s never been a KOM quite like this. For the first time the event consisted of three different races (motos) instead of one final preceded by qualifiers. The riders’ finishing positions in each were added together, with the lowest combined score winning. Jimmy Lewis, the mastermind and driving force behind the race, said the new format primed the event for good racing. It gave riders a chance to make up for a bad race, and there could be three types of events in one—a night race, a desert race, and an…

access_time2 min.
gear bag

1. MALCOLM SMITH RACING Voyager Jacket Black/Hi Viz: $299.95 This mid-weight waterproof jacket has pockets, vents, and a rear pouch big enough for a tool roll. msracing.com (866) 838-4199 2. ALPINESTARS A-10 Full Chest Protector: $229.95 This protector wraps all the way around the torso and has EN 1621-2: 2014 Level 2 back protection and EN 1621-3: Level 2 full chest type A protection. alpinestars.com (800) 409-0903 3. IMS PRODUCTS Core Footpegs: $159 These are the “sharp” version for those who put a premium on grip. IMS also offers a “standard” version. imsproducts.com (800) 237-9906 4. PRO CIRCUIT Airboot For KX250F: $600 This airboot is designed to give air a straighter shot into the throttle body and increase the engine’s over-rev. procircuit.com (951) 738-8050 5. JGRMX Yamaha Carbon-Fiber Exhaust Heat Shields: $99.95 Made in the USA, out of 100-percent…

access_time1 min.
hot shots

AIRGROUP/ ENDURO ENGINEERING RACING HUSQVARNA’S THORN DEVLIN was sitting atop the Rekluse Expert-AA standings in the Kenda AMA National Enduro Series at the time we went to print. The Expert-AA class is a step below the Pro division. There are no age or bike restrictions in the class, and riders graduate to the Pro division the following year after accumulating a designated number of points. MONSTER ENERGY KAWASAKI’S ELI TOMAC has a unique way of creating leverage when he whips his bike. Tomac will hook his foot underneath one of his razor-sharp factory pegs in order to better control the rear end in the air.…

access_time10 min.
does size really matter?

Life is full of choices, right? Like picking the correct size dirt bike for your style and riding ability. Questions flood in all the time about which size motocross machine is right for our readers. So we decided to put this question to the test. We picked five riders who ranged in weight and ability to ride the 2017 KTM 250 SX-F, 350 SX-F, and 450 SX-F in a controlled environment. We enlisted LitPro and its helmet-mounted GPS-enabled data system to help us track each rider’s lap times and progress (if any was made) throughout the day of testing. None of the test riders were told their lap times during the test, as they had to pick which bike they felt most comfortable and thought they were fastest on. Below…

access_time16 min.
that year

A lot gets written about titles when they happen. But now that a bit of time has passed, we thought it would be fun to go back and talk to a few of those champions, one on one, and get the real story of their championship years and the problems and funny stories that accompanied them. 1970S MARTY SMITH | 1977 125cc AMA PRO MOTOCROSS CHAMPION 1974 125cc AMA PRO MOTOCROSS CHAMPION 1975 500cc AMA PRO MOTOCROSS CHAMPION 1977 MARTY’S TYPE TWO Marty Smith was perhaps the first real motocross superstar, with his golden-boy good looks and incredible physique and conditioning. Marty won his first title in 1974, the 125cc Pro Motocross title, which he backed up in 1975. However, he told us his 1977 500cc Motocross title was perhaps his toughest since it featured some knockdown,…

help