ZINIOlogo

Fortean Times 405

Fortean Times chronicles the stranger side of life, delivering a heady mix of weird world news, up-to-date reports and features on every aspect of the unexplained: myths, monsters, ghosts and UFOs rub shoulders with ancient wonders and future science, while expert columnists bring you the latest on everything from cryptozoology to conspiracy theory. Open-minded, well informed and maintaining a healthy sense of humour, Fortean Times is the only place to go for a sensible look at our mad planet – it will change the way you see the world.

Land:
United Kingdom
Sprog:
English
Udgiver:
Dennis Publishing UK
Frekvens:
Monthly
43,35 kr.(Inkl. moms)
465,89 kr.(Inkl. moms)
12 Udgivelser

i denne udgave

3 min
voices from the other side

This issue focuses on a perennial topic not just of fortean research but of religious, scientific and philosophical enquiry down the ages: what, if anything, lies on the other side of death? A second question, and one that often follows the first, is: can we communicate with it – or it with us? The first question has been exercising billionaire Robert Bigelow for some time and has led him to follow a far stranger path than those usually trodden by rich philanthropists sitting on tech fortunes. While Bill Gates is trying to save the planet by sending balloons full of chalk dust to reduce solar radiation and decrease global warming (see p.16), Bigelow – who has previously poured his spare cash into various parapsychological projects – is more concerned with what…

f0002-02
3 min
the ghosts of glasshayes

In 1912, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle drew up plans for the redesign of Lyndhurst Park Hotel, formerly known as Glasshayes House, situated in the village of Lyndhurst in Hampshire’s New Forest. According to blueprints rediscovered four years ago, the best-selling Sherlock Holmes author had intended each section of the hotel’s frontage – its rising turrets, crenels and towers – to represent the various stages of the soul’s passage through and after life. In accordance with his Spiritualist beliefs, the various sections were identified on the sketched plan as: ‘life’, ‘death’, ‘afterlife’, ‘spirits in harmony’ and lastly, ‘higher spiritual place’. The sketch was signed “ACD”. This document was unearthed by local historian Brice Stratford in Conan Doyle’s archives. Glasshayes House was famous for being haunted, probably the reason why Conan Doyle was…

f0004-01
3 min
you win some, you lose some…

BITTERCOIN In 2011, San Francisco-based computer programmer Stefan Thomas was given 7,002 bitcoins as a reward for making a video explaining how the cryptocurrency works. At the time each bitcoin was worth $2-$6. Mr Thomas stored them away in his digital ‘wallet’ and forgot all about them. Currently, however, each bitcoin is now worth $56,000, so the total is worth around $395 million. Unfortunately, during the intervening decade, Mr Thomas had forgotten the password to access his IronKey hard drive (which contains his private keys to the bitcoins). He’s already entered the wrong password eight times, and if his next two guesses are also incorrect, the hard drive will be encrypted and he’ll never be able to get his hands on his $395m fortune. “I would just lie in bed and think…

f0005-01
6 min
covid corner

LAST OF THE JUMA The last surviving male from an exterminated Brazilian indigenous group has died from complications associated with Covid-19. Aruká Juma died in February aged between 86 and 90, the last Juma man who remained from a tribe once numbering 15,000 people. Repeated massacres in the 20th century meant that by 2002, just five Juma people were left – Mr Juma, his three daughters and a grandchild. At the start of the pandemic many indigenous groups sought to cut themselves off from the outside world by closing roads and turning away visitors. Unfortunately, these attempts at isolation failed, and the coronavirus is now widespread among indigenous communities. 162 tribes from a total of 305 have been affected. Brazil’s indigenous population is thought to number 900,000, of whom at least 50,000 have…

common01
6 min
sidelines…

FELINY ASSAULT An ex-con is back in jail after allegedly striking her male roommate in the face with a cat. Wendi Hird, 56, and her 73-year-old victim were once lovers but are now platonic friends. After a “verbal argument” at their Largo, Florida home, police say Hird took their cat and threw it at the victim’s head, causing it to scratch him. Hird then herself struck the man in the face. She was arrested for domestic battery on a person over 65, a felony. thesmokinggun.com 2 Mar 2021. TYRELESS Alex Oates, 24, drove his Fiat Punto on a motorway with no tyres. An off-duty cop saw sparks flying from all four wheels and called 999. At one stage, Oates stopped and tried pushing the car along the M65 motorway in Lancashire. Drink had…

f0006-01
7 min
medical bag

MAGNET-SWALLOWING CHILDREN A 12-year-old boy underwent a life-saving operation after deliberately swallowing 54 magnets. Rhiley Morrison, from Prestwich, Greater Manchester, wanted to see if metal would stick to his stomach and so ate magnetic balls on two separate occasions. After he told his mother, Ms Paige Ward, about his dangerous experiment, she took him to Salford Royal Hospital. An X-ray revealed 54 of the magnet toys were inside his stomach and bowel. Rhiley was then sent by ambulance to Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital, where doctors, fearing that the powerful magnets might burn through his tissue or vital organs with the potential for fatal internal damage, removed the objects during a six-hour keyhole surgery procedure. Initially, when the balls had not reappeared after four days, Rhiley told his mother he had swallowed two…

common01