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Inside Cricket

Inside Cricket January - February 2016

The Inside Cricket team gives you an insider's view of what's going on around the cricketing world - news, features, coaching tips, fitness guide, statistics, giant posters, and the chance to win great prizes. Plus, there's columns from former Australian captains Richie Benaud, Ian Chappell and Mark Taylor, along with Australian No.4 Test batsman Mike Hussey's exclusive monthly insights, making it a must read for all cricket tragics. Inside Cricket is a seasonal title publishing 4 issues PA - 3 issues over Australia’s summer, and one in its Autumn as a season round-up.

Land:
Australia
Sprog:
English
Udgiver:
Nextmedia Pty Ltd
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I denne udgave

4 min.
editor’s note

Cricket rightly celebrates its illustrious, fascinating past. Because it does, we get a sharp sense of the old and the new, and how they meet; we feel sentimental for that past and new sentiment as we embrace young players and want to give them a revered place in cricket history. First, the past: we’ve been doing far too many of these lately. Two more great characters of the game, Frank Tyson and Lindsay Kline, passed since we last went to print. Normally we’d run a tribute page, but sadly, our 98 pages were planned and commissioned long in advance. Tyson (pictured) was, to those who saw him and experienced his bowling, simply the fastest bowler in history for a short time. He exploded like a flare star, momentarily casting an exposing light…

1 min.
great shot

4 min.
chris lynn

There are many contenders for Australian batting places right now, but few as exciting as Chris Lynn. Lynn has proven that he excels with the blade in all forms of the game, but he takes particular pride in his batting in first-class cricket. A sensational catch brought Lynn to the world’s attention in 2014. He was playing for Kolkata against Royal Chargers Bangalore in the IPL and fielding square on the fence, when A.B. De Villiers got onto one and hoiked it savagely in his direction. There were three balls to go, six runs for the Chargers to win, and De Villiers’ six would have finished it. It was hit hard, but would have been a conventional catch, if a stinging one. Lynn moved in slightly from the boundary, then slipped…

2 min.
first session

“I wouldn’t be buying tickets for the fourth and fifth days.” Steve Waugh’s acerbic summation of the West Indies tour. The West Indies scored Tests in Sydney and Melbourne. "I don't think he needs to apologise. I just don't think he needs to do it in the future." Steve Smith on Mitchell Starc’s last-day explosion in the first NZ Test when he threw a ball at NZ batsman Mark Craig after Craig blocked one of his del iveries. "I'd describe it as a jigsaw with hal f the pieces missing." Kiw i coach Mi ke Hesson after the Kiw is refused to bat i n t heir tour match following Aaron Finch and Ryan Carters’ extraordi nary op ening stand and the CA XI’s declaration at 1-503. They had no complaints! "I never…

4 min.
first session

BATTING BEATINGS At one stage in the first Test between England and Pakistan in Abu Dhabi this October, 804 runs were scored for the loss of nine wickets, almost 90 (89.33) runs per batsman! Pakistan declared at 8 for 523 and England 1 for 281. The highest score by a team in Test history is 6 declared for 952 by Sri Lanka against India at Colombo in August 1997. This works out at 158.66 runs per batsman. But the record of most runs per batsman in Tests is 263.33 when West Indies amassed 3 declared for 790 against Pakistan at Kingston in February 1958. England captain Alastair Cook is the only batsman to play two Test innings of over 12 hours each: 773 minutes (12 hours and 53 minutes) when he made 294…

6 min.
new ball

On February 7, 2016, the Bradman Foundation XI play the Massai Cricket Warriors at Bradman Oval in Bowral. “Massai” is not just some team emblem, like Proteas or Silver Ferns. These are the real thing: the Kenyan Massai, or Maasai tribe. The Warriors play mainly shirtless, in colourful headpieces, beads, robes and often sandals – though more modern footwear has, sensibly, begun to be used. Though the team’s main purpose is spreading awareness in their Kenyan community about HIV/AIDS and women’s issues, it began life as the brainchild of a South African woman, Aliya Bauer, who came into the Likipia region to research baboons. Isolated from her own society, she missed her cricket, and decided to introduce local schoolchildren to the game, using basic gear she’d had shipped from home. She…