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You South Africa You Pulses

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Land:
South Africa
Sprog:
English
Udgiver:
Media 24 Ltd
Frekvens:
Weekly
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52 Udgivelser

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3 min.
pick your pulses

The pulses below are interchangeable in most recipes as there’s little difference in taste between the various kinds. Darker coloured beans – such as red-speckled beans and red kidney beans – are mostly used with red meat such as mince. When using beans with chicken or pork, opt for those lighter in colour such as kidney beans or haricot beans. 1 KIDNEY BEANS (lima beans) are the most common beans. Cannellini and borlotti beans are also kidneys beans and are especially prevalent in Italian cooking. Borlotti beans are pinkish. Butter beans are also a type of kidney bean but it has a starchier texture and a buttery taste (as the name indicates). In a pot 3½-4 hours In a pressure cooker 60 min 2 WHOLE LENTILS (black or brown) don’t have to be soaked before cooking. Red split…

1 min.
nutritional value

Although pulses (including beans) are about 60% carbohydrates, about 9% of that is fibre, both soluble and insoluble, which aids digestion. Pulses are a great source of plant protein (about 9%) and contain almost no fat or cholesterol. They’re also a rich source of iron and potassium. About 40% of the starch in cooked pulses is so-called resistant starch. It acts in much the same way as soluble fibre in that it’s not converted to glucose by gut enzymes but ends up in the digestive tract as fibre. In the digestive tract, the resistant starch and fibre are fermented, forming short-chain fatty acids, which have many health benefits. Legumes prevent constipation, lower blood cholesterol and have a low glycaemic index, which means they stabilise blood-sugar levels for longer. That’s why they’re such a…

1 min.
fresh tomato and chickpea salad

SERVES 4 Preparation time 10 min Cooking time 5 min INGREDIENTS ◗ 1 ciabatta bread◗ 45ml (3T) olive oil◗ 1 red onion, sliced◗ 1 can (400g) chickpeas, drained◗ 250g cherry tomatoes, gently crushed◗ 30g fresh basil, stems removed◗ extra olive oil◗ salt and freshly ground black pepper. Preheat the oven to 220°C. 1 Tear the ciabatta into chunks and arrange on a baking sheet. 2 Drizzle the olive oil over and toast in the oven for 3-5 minutes or until crisp. 3 Toss the onion, chickpeas, tomatoes, basil and bread chunks in a bowl. 4 Drizzle with extra olive oil and season with salt and pepper.…

1 min.
warm chickpea and cauliflower salad

SERVES 3-4 Preparation time 5 min Cooking time 10 min INGREDIENTS SALAD ◗ 15ml (1T) oil◗ 1 packet (600g) cauliflower florets◗ 15ml (1T) garlic and ginger paste◗ 1 chilli, chopped◗ 2 cans (400g each) chickpeas, rinsed and drained◗ salt DRESSING ◗ 60ml (¼c) olive oil◗ 5ml (1t) coriander pesto◗ 60ml (¼c) rice or apple cider vinegar◗ 30ml (2T) pickled ginger, roughly chopped◗ 2,5ml (½t) Chinese five-spice powder◗ 60ml (¼c) teriyaki sauce◗ 15ml (1T) brown sugar TO SERVE ◗ handful of fresh coriander 1 Salad Heat the oil and gently stir-fry the cauliflower. Add the garlic and ginger paste and chilli and stir-fry until the cauliflower is done but still crunchy. 2 Add the chickpeas and season with salt. Set aside. 3 Dressing Mix the ingredients and pour over the cauliflower and chickpeas. 4 To serve Add the coriander and toss. Serve lukewarm.…

1 min.
high-fibre lentil and bulgur salad

This tasty salad is super-good for you too. Lentils and bulgur both have a low GI and are low in fat and high in fibre and protein. Bulgur is also a good source of iron. SERVES 4 Preparation time 10 min Cooking time 20 min INGREDIENTS SALAD ◗ 15ml (1T) olive oil◗ 1 onion, chopped◗ 3-5 garlic cloves, crushed◗ 5ml (1t) ground coriander◗ 5ml (1t) ground cumin◗ 10-15ml (2-3t) mild curry powder◗ 5ml (1t) turmeric◗ 250g mushrooms, sliced◗ 30ml (2T) spring onions◗ 60ml (¼c) mixed chopped fresh coriander and mint◗ 500ml (2c) soaked bulgur or cooked pearl wheat or barley◗ 500ml (2c) cooked lentils◗ salt and freshly ground pepper◗ olive oil TO SERVE ◗ 125g baby spinach◗ a few dollops of plain full-cream yoghurt◗ 45ml (3T) almond splinters, toasted 1 Salad Heat the oil and fry the onion and…

1 min.
colourful bean salad

SERVES 6 Preparation time 15 min Standing time 1 hour INGREDIENTS DRESSING ◗ 125ml (½c) olive oil◗ 45ml (3T) wine vinegar◗ juice of 3 limes or 2 lemons◗ 45ml (3T) ground cumin◗ 5ml (1t) chilli paste◗ 15ml (1T) sugar◗ 1 garlic clove, crushed◗ salt and freshly ground pepper SALAD ◗ 800g cooked red kidney beans◗ 2 cans (410g each) whole-kernel corn, drained◗ 1 red and 1 green pepper, diced◗ 2-3 red chillies, seeded and chopped◗ 180ml (¾c) finely chopped red onion◗ 125ml (½c) chopped fresh coriander 1 Dressing Mix all the ingredients in a cup or jug and set aside. 2 Salad Mix the beans and whole-kernel corn with the peppers in a large bowl. Add the chillies, onion and coriander and mix well. 3 Pour the dressing over the salad and allow to stand for at least an hour…