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category_outlined / News & Politics
Earth Island JournalEarth Island Journal

Earth Island Journal Autumn 2015

Earth Island Journal is a publication in the field of news and society offering news and analysis about energy and the environment

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Earth Island Institute
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4 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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re-indigenizing the people to the planet

This special issue of Earth Island Journal is not a how-to manual, nor is it a warning message or a self-help treatise — though it includes all of those elements and more. It is, simply, a message from Indigenous communities meant to spark a conversation about what the dominant culture can learn from the world’s Indigenous cultures. For some of you, the words inside will be lessons that wake you up; for others, the articles here will be reminders, like a splash of water to the face.You will be reminded, for example, about First Nations’ efforts to regain aboriginal title to stolen lands. You will be reminded of the sacredness of life and humans’ “treaty with creation” that requires honoring limits, recognizing kinship with the nonhuman, and giving back. You…

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letters & emails

www.bizarro.comInspired to ActionThank you for such an informative cover story on the plight of African elephants (“The End for Elephants,” Summer 2015). I knew that elephants were being killed for their ivory but never realized, until recently, that the number of deaths was so high. I am looking into ways in which I, as an individual, can help stop this from happening.Mary Ann BudinHaverstraw, NYDon’t Print PropagandaI find it offensive that the Journal published what amounts to a proelephant poaching piece by Daniel Stiles (Plus Minus: “Only Legal Ivory Can Stop Poaching,” Summer 2015). Allowing Stiles to spew his lies in print is like the Second World War allies printing the “opposite point of view” by Joseph Goebbels, Hitler’s propaganda minister.It is settled science and policy within the elephant conservation…

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pollution makes us dumber

Scientists have known for a while that fine particle exposure increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, respiratory illness, and even cancer. New research adds another frightening risk to that list: brain aging.A new study, published in the Annals of Neurology, estimated pollution exposure levels for 1,403 older women from 1999 to 2006. Researchers collected data on exposure to PM 2.5 (fine particulates that penetrate deep into the lungs) and used MRI scans to measure brain volume. What they found was worrisome, particularly for those living near busy roads or industrial areas: Each increase of 3.49 micrograms per cubic meter of air in fine particle pollution exposure was associated with a 6.23 cubic centimeter decrease in brain white matter, which is important for cognition. This loss is equivalent to one to…

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highway for busy bees

A wildlife corridor in the air: The Norwegian capital of Oslo is constructing a “bee highway” of flowering plants and shelters to assist native pollinators. (PHOTO ZSÓFI DEÁK)In what may be the most charming effort yet to help endangered pollinators, Oslo is building a first-of-its kind “bee highway” through the city. The wildlife corridor though the Norwegian capital will include a network of beefriendly food and shelter stops, with highway “infrastructure” built everywhere from rooftop gardens to local cemeteries.The highway will address a common challenge for city-dwelling bees: Nectar and pollen-rich flowers are often scarce where concrete is plentiful. By increasing the number of flowering plants in Oslo, pollinator proponents hope to facilitate passage through the city. The goal is ultimately to have a pollinator station every 250 meters.“We are…

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island nations take a stand against big polluters

On Tarawa, the main atoll in Kiribati, mangroves help to protect against the rising sea levels caused by climate change.As global temperatures continue to set records and extreme weather events are increasingly attributed to climate change, it’s obvious that global warming is no longer a distant threat. It is upon us — here and now. No one understands this better than those living in island communities.In June, representatives from six South Pacific island nations — Vanuatu, Kiribati, Tuvalu, Fiji, the Solomon Islands, and the Philippines — signed the People’s Declaration for Climate Justice, which calls out the current impact and future threats of climate change. The declaration vows to hold big polluters responsible for climate change and, most importantly, to bring an international legal case investigating the human rights implications…

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cecil, rip

The Internet went ballistic in July over the killing of Cecil, a muchloved, 13-year-old lion that lived in Zimbabwe’s Hwange National Park. So bitter was the vitriol against Walter J. Palmer, the Minnesota dentist allegedly responsible for the act, that he had to shut down his website and Facebook page, then his dental practice, and ultimately go into hiding.Palmer and his companions apparently baited Cecil out of the protected area at night and shot him with a crossbow. The wounded lion escaped, but the trophy hunters spent 40 hours tracking him down and eventually shot him in the head, then decapitated and skinned him. As this issue went to press, Palmer’s whereabouts were still unknown, the US Fish and Wildlife Service was investigating the circumstances surrounding the lion’s killing, and…

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