EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / News & Politics
Earth Island JournalEarth Island Journal

Earth Island Journal Winter 2015

Earth Island Journal is a publication in the field of news and society offering news and analysis about energy and the environment

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Earth Island Institute
Read Morekeyboard_arrow_down
SUBSCRIBE
$15
4 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
follow the money

Launched just three years ago, 350.org’s Divest from Fossil Fuels campaign is showing signs of impressive momentum. The global climate justice group likes to compare its effort to convince universities, churches, and governments to sell their fossil fuel stocks to the divestment campaign of the 1980s targeting South African apartheid. Some observers — including allies — have said the strategy isn’t very, well, strategic since the carbon barons will be able to find capital elsewhere. But a number of big time investors are listening to the environmental group and are pulling their money out of fossil fuels.Some 181 institutions and local governments and 656 individuals representing more than $50 billion in wealth have publicly committed to divest from fossil fuels. The list includes cities such as San Francisco and Providence,…

access_time14 min.
food forest

WAVES OF HEAT LIFT as we disembark our dugout canoe on the banks of a snaking tributary of the Madre de Dios River in the Peruvian Amazon. We are entering Vilma Zegarra’s forest concession, not far from the Bolivian border. It is February, high summer, and peak harvest season for castañeros like Zegarra, who manage large tracts of natural forests for the production of Brazil nuts.We walk a narrow track through this patch of forest at the edge of the Tambopata National Reserve. Flinty blue butterflies circle off the forest floor, parrots fly overhead in pairs. Soon we reach a clutch of mature Brazil nut trees soaring into the canopy above. Several appear to be producing a bumper crop of fruits this year. Called cocos locally (they look like miniature…

access_time1 min.
a nice serving of propaganda

In October, the Chinese government, worried about strong public resistance to genetically modified crops, launched a major media campaign to convince its citizens that GM foods are safe.For close to a decade, China has been importing millions of tons of GM soybeans annually, mostly to feed its massive stock of pigs and to produce vegetable oil. But the country doesn’t grow any GM crops itself, in part because of public fears about the technology. Many Chinese were upset when, earlier this year, a TV exposé revealed that GM rice had been sold for human consumption at supermarkets in Hubei province in violation of Chinese law.Yet Chinese officials in Beijing are convinced that GM technology will be essential to help feed the world’s largest population. The combined TV, newspaper, and Internet…

access_time2 min.
evol ution of an idea

Questions about our relationship with and responsibility toward other animals have always been troubling. The elaborate rituals of Judaism’s kosher rules and Islam’s halal, for example, may have started as a way of atoning for the act of murder. The development of a coherent animal rights philosophy has been unsteady, with setbacks and reversals accompanying each attempt at more enlightened thinking.Hindu, Jain and Buddhist philosophies preach ahimsa, or nonviolence toward all animals, based on the thought that all living beings are part of one interconnected, divine soul.570–400 BCEThe Greek philosopher and mathematician Pythagoras — one of the earliest Western campaigners for ethical vegetarianism — claims that animals, like humans, have souls.Aristotle argues that animals are inferior to humans because they can’t reason, and that nature created them to serve our…

access_time1 min.
scuba diving tanks coral health

Scuba diving might appear to be harmless form of recreation, but it turns out that diving may not be as sustainable as thought. Researchers in Koh Tao, Thailand surveyed more than 10,000 corals at 10 reefs sites looking for signs of coral disease such as white syndrome and brown band disease, as well as other coral health indicators like bleaching. They found that coral at popular dive sites fared much worse than those at other sites. Only 45 percent of the coral at popular diving areas was in healthy condition. In comparison, roughly 79 percent of the corals were healthy at sites with few divers. ■…

access_time2 min.
what’s in a name?

The Millennial Generation — roughly defined as those who are between the ages of 18 and 33 today — is among the most obsessively watched demographic cohorts in US history (which probably makes sense for the children of the famously self-absorbed Baby Boomers). There are reams of studies and public opinion polls gauging what Millennials like and dislike, how they act, how they vote, where they’re headed. Add to the mix this provocative finding: While Millennials rank relatively high on surveys asking about opinions on the environment, they are loath to call themselves “environmentalists.”In general, Millennials are a rather green group — not surprising given that they were raised on reports of a fizzling ozone layer and an overheated planet. Millennials overwhelmingly believe in global warming; 75 percent of them…

help