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category_outlined / News & Politics
Earth Island JournalEarth Island Journal

Earth Island Journal Winter 2017

Earth Island Journal is a publication in the field of news and society offering news and analysis about energy and the environment

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Earth Island Institute
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$15
4 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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there’s a crack in everything

Just a few days after the US elections it’s already clear that difficult times lie ahead. The multiple reports of hate and bigotry coming in from across this nation have made the prospect of the next four years under a Donald Trump presidency seem nightmarish to many. The future of our lands and waters too, is in grave peril. There’s no escaping the fact that under a climate change denying president and a right-wing GOP, many of the environmental protections we have fought so hard for over decades might get rolled back. At immediate risk are Obama’s Clean Power Plan, the Paris climate accord, and the powers of the EPA. Trump has also prioritized removing restrictions against coal, oil, and natural gas extraction and reviving “vital energy infrastructure projects” like…

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letters & emails

Letters to the Editor Earth Island Journal 2150 Allston Way #460 Berkeley, CA 94704 editor@earthisland.org(www.bizarro.com)Yes, We Need More ParksI stumbled upon Earth Island Journal through a gift subscription and find it to be one of the best publications on the market. The recent issue on national parks was a true bonus. I especially appreciated Michael Kellett’s article on the need to expand our park system (“Room for More,” Autumn 2016). Sixteen years ago I was medically released from my career as a librarian due to a permanent back injury. The medical retirement allowed me to obtain a Golden Access Card to the national parks, and I decided to put all the national parks on my bucket list. I’m proud to say I’ve visited over 40 national parks so far and…

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point of no return

Yet another unhappy milestone crossed. For the first time since before the Ice Age, carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere failed to drop below 400 parts per million this summer and scientists are saying they are never going to fall below that threshold again in our lifetimes.Typically, carbon dioxide levels go up and down each year, reaching their highest concentrations in May. They decrease again in the fall as plants in the northern hemisphere absorb this potent greenhouse gas through photosynthesis during the growing season. The lowest level of CO2 in the atmosphere usually occurs around the last week of September. Carbon levels in the Earth’s atmosphere first crossed the 400 ppm threshold back in May 2013, but didn’t hold steady at that level through the rest of the summer…

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first flight

In October, a California condor chick born in Pinnacles National Park survived its first flight from the nest, a feat not accomplished in the park in more than 100 years. (PHOTO PACIFIC SOUTHWEST REGION USFWS)California condors just achieved a milestone: For the first time in more than a century, a chick hatched in the wild in Pinnacles National Park has survived its first flight from the nest.California condors have travelled a long, hard road. In 1982, their population bottomed-out at just 22 individuals, primarily due to habitat loss, lead poisoning, and hunting. In a bold effort to save the large scavengers, biologists captured all surviving California condors and began a captive breeding program.The effort has paid off. Offspring from the breeding program have been released back into the wild and…

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parrots protected

It’s good to see that sometimes when an alarm is sounded, it spurs action. The United Nations has banned global trade in wild African grey parrots, one of the world’s most popular pet birds, which have virtually vanished from their native habitats in West Africa due to poaching and habitat loss.The move follows an early 2016 warning by scientists from BirdLife International and Manchester Metropolitan University that revealed that about 90 to 99 percent of the species’ wild population in Ghana had been lost since 1992, and that the same pattern likely held true across its natural habitat in central and western Africa.Demand for African greys, which are known for their intelligence and ability to mimic human speech, has remained high even though the international trade in wild birds was…

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feeding extinction

Crocodile and antelope meat for sale at the Moutuka Nunene market in Lukolela, Democratic Republic of Congo. An estimated 300 mammal species are being hunted to extinction to feed the bushmeat trade.More Online: Read daily environmental news updates at: www.earthislandjournal.orgThe rapid extinction of wildlife across the world is usually blamed on habitat loss, agricultural expansion, environmental destruction, and climate change. Now, researchers are pointing to yet another factor: We are literally eating many of our fellow nonhumans to extinction.A new study, published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, says some 300 wild mammal species in Asia, Africa, and South America are being driven to extinction by humanity’s voracious appetite for bushmeat.Bushmeat, or wild animal meat, has long been a food source for many rural communities in these countries. However,…

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