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EatingWellEatingWell

EatingWell September/October 2018

What's for dinner? Is it healthy? Is it easy? If you ask these questions, Eating Well is for you. The magazine "Where Good Taste Meets Good Health," Eating Well delivers the information and inspiration you need to make healthy eating a way of life with great, easy recipes (most take 45 minutes or less), the latest nutrition science, gorgeous photos and crisp, evocative prose.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Meredith Corporation
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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united by food

(VIVIEN KILLILEA BEST)For many Americans the Middle East evokes unease. The food is different—we’ve increasingly embraced it. And with this special Middle Eastern-themed issue, we aim to open the door a little wider and give a more nuanced taste of what the region has to offer. But I also want to throw out a grander hope: that in some small way this issue might build understanding.Each story in this issue brings us different perspectives. Iranian-American author Louisa Shafia talks about why she visited Iran despite her father’s objections. She yearned for a connection to her roots and culinary heritage. In Lebanon, we meet Kamal Mouzawak, who was inspired by the way a neighborhood cultural center brought people together after the country’s bitter civil war. Part entrepreneur, part visionary and advocate,…

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the soufra project

Palestinian Mariam Shaar (left) grew up in a refugee camp in Lebanon. She and the food truck she launched in 2017 are the subject of Soufra, a movie executive-produced by Susan Sarandon that will be released on October 11.Like many refugees, one of the challenges Shaar faced was finding a job. So in 2013, after getting funding from a nonprofit, along with guidance from food entrepreneur Kamal Mouzawak (page 76), she started a catering company. Eventually she added her food truck, which brings Palestinian food to Beirut’s Souk El Tayeb market. Shaar’s growing business employs 25 to 30 women from the refugee camp.To support Shaar’s project, go see the movie or purchase the cookbook, Soufra: Recipes from a Refugee Food Truck. (Shaar’s employees get half the profits from the book.)…

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what’s trending @eatingwell.com

1 LET’S DO LUNCHKid-friendly bentos. Vegetarian and vegan ideas. Salads in jars! We’ve got your better-for-the-fam lunch game plan.2 SOUP SWAPScroll through 400+ soups online (hello, Tomato Soup with Grilled Cheese Croutons). Plus pre-order our new cookbook, EatingWell Soups.3 30 DAYS OF VEGANA month without meat or dairy is delightful (yaaas Vegan Pancakes!) with our satisfying meal plan.Get all the recipes at EatingWell.com/webextraTHE BIG INSTAGRAM QUESTIONWhat’s your favorite Middle Eastern restaurant?PersepolisUPPER EAST SIDE, NYCBecause sour cherry rice.—vilmarieeLa PitaDEARBORN, MIThe grilled meat is perfection. Juicy and tender… Grilled chicken fattoush is so yummy.—laury_rivera_abouarabiLayali MiamiMIAMI, FLMakes you feel like you really are in Lebanon.—luvlifefullRumi’s KitchenATLANTA, GAThe lamb shank.—finleytattedbearOleanaCAMBRIDGE, MAJames Beard Award-winning chef Ana Sortun has inventive meals.—sobeyk8teeTanoreenBROOKLYN, NYYou’ll never look at hummus the same again.—lezengelZahavPHILADELPHIA, PA—erindishesSitti & NeomondeRALEIGH, NCDelicious food.—vggibsonShawarma CityBUFFALO, NYDoesn’t look…

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letters

I have a huge concern about the health of this beautiful place we call home. Your articles about those working toward solutions on sustainability, reducing food waste, and healthier ways of growing food give me hope that we really can create a healthier planet.■ Philomena ValenteAverill Park, NYSummer Recipes with a Side of Food PoliticsEatingWell is that rare (and getting rarer) breed of food magazine that takes a holistic look at what we eat and how we eat. Two thumbs up!■ Paula Zevin, Somerset, NJThis [July/August 2018] has been one of my favorite issues of all time. Food is wonderful, but when we know what is best, the best producers and processors, and the history behind the food, it makes it even more enjoyable.■ Lois CampbellAmerican Food HeroesYour latest issue arrived…

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lesson: galettes

SHARE SOME HISTORYThe legend of Johnny Appleseed is based on a man named John Chapman who traveled around the Midwest in the early 19th century, planting apple orchards as he went.WHY DO APPLES DISCOLOR?A cut apple can turn brown fast but it’s still safe to eat. The color change is due to a chemical reaction called enzymatic browning, triggered when the fruit’s flesh is exposed to oxygen.THE POWER OF PECTINDon’t be fooled! There’s no butter in apple butter. Its spreadable texture comes from a type of sugar molecule called pectin, which helps apples and their juices thicken as they cook.Ham, Gruyère & Apple GalettesACTIVE: 50 min TOTAL: 1 hr 20 min EQUIPMENT: 6-inch round cutterServe these free-form tarts with a green salad.2 prepared pie crusts (14- to 16-ounce package), thawed…

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one pan

Ginger-Molasses Roasted Salmon & BroccoliACTIVE: 25 min TOTAL: 25 minServe over rice noodles tossed with sesame oil and scallions along with a cold bottle of Brooklyn Brewery’s Sorachi Ace saison.1½ tablespoons toasted (dark) sesame oil1½ tablespoons reduced-sodium tamari1½ tablespoons rice vinegar1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger¼ teaspoon salt, divided8 cups large broccoli florets with 2-inch stalks attached (about 1 pound)1 tablespoon molasses1¼ pounds wild salmon, cut into 4 portions2 teaspoons toasted sesame seeds1. Preheat oven to 425°F. Coat a rimmed baking sheet with cooking spray.2. Whisk oil, tamari, vinegar, ginger and ⅛ teaspoon salt in a large bowl. Add broccoli and toss to coat. Transfer to the prepared pan using tongs or a slotted spoon, leaving as much marinade as possible in the bowl. Whisk molasses into the remaining marinade.3. Roast…

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