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EdgeEdge

Edge January 2019

The authority on videogame art, design and play, Edge is the must-have companion for game industry professionals, aspiring game-makers and super-committed hobbyists. Its mission is to celebrate the best in interactive entertainment today and identify the most important developments of tomorrow, providing the most trusted, in-depth editorial in the business via unparalleled access to the developers and technologies that make videogames the world’s most dynamic form of entertainment.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
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$39.99
13 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
we’re all connected in this world, don’t you forget it

You might not have noticed, but the outside world isn’t a great place to be at the moment – and not just because of the short days and too-early mornings we expect at this time of year. Games and winters have long gone hand in hand, but with so much bile and disorder out there, there’s never been a better reason to stop indoors with the curtains closed. Games aren’t just about escapism, however. They are also about healing, and there’s a positive, restorative air to our latest issue. It’s perhaps most obvious in Tetris Effect, which we belatedly review this month. Tetsuya Mizuguchi’s latest is a relaxing, cleansing experience that makes you feel a little more positive about the world and your place within it. We also catch up with…

access_time8 min.
reality bites

Perhaps, in hindsight, Brendan Iribe was always meant to leave Oculus. The co-founder and one-time CEO of the company that sparked virtual reality’s return has enjoyed a successful career, sure – but it’s one that’s been spent building up companies into perfect acquisition material, then walking once the deal’s done. He was a co-founder of Scaleform, the game UI middleware bought by Autodesk in 2011. From there he went to Gaikai, the cloud-streaming game technology Sony snapped up to lay the foundations for PlayStation Now. Iribe left Oculus in November, having been around since its inception in 2012. The cynic might wonder why he stuck it out for so long: Facebook’s $2.3 billion acquisition of Oculus completed in the summer of 2014. But it was not a big cheque that prompted…

access_time5 min.
a better tomorrow

Fortnite may be the biggest game on the planet right now, but surely there were better ways to open an Xbox livestream than with a montage piece of various people in freefall. Optics are everything, after all, and this was, we assume quite unintentionally, a bit on the nose. Still, Microsoft will feel like it left this event having stuck the landing. Insofar as the company has ever had a coherent set of goals for Xbox One, it at least had a core message here, and it drummed it in relentlessly. You could sum it up in two words, were it not repeated so often. Game Pass, Game Pass, Game Pass. Notionally the first event of its kind, XO18 was in fact a rebadging of the Xbox Fanfest in Mexico City,…

access_time5 min.
state of the onion

Before he founded Onion Games in 2012, Yoshiro Kimura felt lost, a man “without a cause”. He’d left Grasshopper Manufacture, after producing Suda 51’s No More Heroes and its sequel and directing the wonderful Little King’s Story. And with the Tohoku earthquake still fresh in his mind, Kimura found himself thinking about his career. “Games didn’t seem to play a part in helping humanity, in helping Japan rebuild,” he says. Meanwhile, the industry he loved seemed to be increasingly focused on social games, and that just wasn’t Kimura at all. He wasn’t sure where to go or what to do. The turning point came during a trip to San Francisco to attend 2012’s Independent Games Festival. Kimura looked up at a huge screen, showcasing a whole host of indie games, and…

access_time1 min.
danse macabre

Who says the reaper has to be grim? A puzzle game in which you orchestrate fatal accidents by manipulating shadows and moving blocks, Felix The Reaper is about facing life’s greatest inevitability with a spring in your step. “Death is a rather depressing motive,” art director Mikkel Maltesen says, “but I ended up with a design that made Felix friendly, unthreatening, and round. Our historian, Søren Hein, found a medieval text describing death as an office clerk, so we went with a combination of a grey and boring office clerk and a dancing death. Working as an agent of death is a conformal, stiff thing, so dancing is Felix’s way to add colour to his trivial work.” Get ready to shimmy your way through a morbid nine-to-five when Felix The Reaper…

access_time1 min.
soundbytes

“I have a project that I truly wish to solidify as my next challenge. I have decided to leave my current position and start my own business in order to achieve my goal.”Final Fantasy XV director Hajime Tabata quits Square Enix to make a game that’s actually finishable“You have been training for years and years to be where you are. Along the way, you have probably had to explain yourselves more than once, convincing people that you are not wasting your time.”Lars Løkke Rasmussen, PM of Denmark, is talking either about esports or making a magazine about videogames“They love what they love and want what they want. That passion, it’s actually what drives us, and we feel it too.”Blizzard’s Allen Adham puts a positive spin on the miserable reception afforded…

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