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EdgeEdge

Edge November 2019

The authority on videogame art, design and play, Edge is the must-have companion for game industry professionals, aspiring game-makers and super-committed hobbyists. Its mission is to celebrate the best in interactive entertainment today and identify the most important developments of tomorrow, providing the most trusted, in-depth editorial in the business via unparalleled access to the developers and technologies that make videogames the world’s most dynamic form of entertainment.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
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$39.99
13 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
if you don’t eat yer meat, you can’t have any pudding

As we send this issue to press, it’s the final days of the school summer holidays. One member of the Edge brood is seeing deadline day out in fine style: sitting on his backside playing videogames. Were we not quite so profoundly jealous we might suggest he put the controller down for a bit; maybe go outside, enjoy the sun while it lasts. But we know the feeling all too well – and besides, he’s had plenty of fresh air these last six weeks. Not all parents are quite so understanding, of course. (Fewer still are as jealous as we are.) Perhaps those stuffy old sorts will be a little more welcoming to this month’s cover game. Minecraft Earth drags a popcultural phenomenon into a very different kind of videogame open…

access_time1 min.
edge

EDITORIAL Nathan Brown editor Jen Simpkins deputy editor Andrew Hind art editor Miriam McDonald operations editor CONTRIBUTORS Julian Benson, Rob Crossland, Edwin Evans-Thirlwell, Lewis Gordon, Alex Hutchinson, Phil Iwaniuk, Emmanuel Pajon, Jeremy Peel, Steven Poole, Chris Schilling, Alex Spencer SPECIAL THANKS Duncan Harris, Nick Thorpe ADVERTISING Clare Dove commercial sales director Kevin Stoddart account manager (+44 (0) 1225 687455 kevin.stoddart@futurenet.com) CIRCULATION Tim Mathers head of newstrade +44 (0) 1202 586200 PRODUCTION Mark Constance head of production US & UK Clare Scott production project manager Hollie Dowse advertising production manager Jason Hudson digital editions controller Nola Cokely production manager MANAGEMENT Aaron Asadi chief operating officer Paul Newman group content director Dan Dawkins content director, games & film Tony Mott editorial director, games Warren Brown senior art editor Rodney Dive head of art & design Dan Jotcham commercial finance director Printed in the UK by William Gibbons & Sons on behalf of Future.…

access_time5 min.
final stage

Just two months ago, our E3 report sought to discover what Sony’s absence from the biggest videogame show on the planet told us about the balance of power in the industry as we looked towards the next generation of consoles. Two months later, we realise our error. These days conventions are not defined by the absence, or presence, of major platform holders or publishers. No, it is simply a matter of whether or not they have Geoff Keighley. This year, for the first time, Gamescom had him – and gave him headline billing with the inaugural Gamescom: Opening Night Live broadcast – and it is probably just as well. Elsewhere this was a case of recent history broadly repeating. While Sony did deign to show up to the Cologne event after…

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arena tour

Google Stadia made its Gamescom debut, and got right into the swing of things with a rather boring pre-recorded broadcast. Headlines were made – Cyberpunk 2077 was the main attraction, and Robot Entertainment’s Orcs Must Die! 3 the star in terms of new exclusives – but the format did nothing to sell Stadia’s potential. Like Google’s pre-E3 show it was talking heads on all-white backgrounds, barking out the names of forthcoming games. With launch a matter of months away, Google not only has to bolster its launch line-up, it must also work out how to properly convey to a sceptical audience that the tech works, and is something to be truly excited about.…

access_time5 min.
player power

Sometimes, ignorance really is bliss. Chances are we will never know how much it cost to persuade the most famous streamer on the planet, Tyler ‘Ninja’ Blevins, to move from Amazon’s Twitch to Microsoft’s Mixer. And it is probably better that way. One rumour put the figure at $10m a year for the next five years; in all truth, that is probably on the conservative side. At his peak in 2018, Blevins had some 200,000 subscribers and over 14 million followers on Twitch. He was banking seven figures a month. For all that his star has fallen somewhat since then, he remains the poster boy for live game streaming, and likely will for some time to come. His services will not have come cheap. Yet this is more than just a…

access_time4 min.
switcher perspective

There’s arguably no genre better-suited to Nintendo’s home console/handheld hybrid than the open-world RPG. Breath Of The Wild was the ideal launch game for Switch, demonstrating how a vast adventure could scale according to a player’s needs: all-consuming on a TV, yet even more magical on the go, the world’s breadth and depth perfectly preserved and always available. Then again, it was built specifically for it. Retrofitting a technical powerhouse of an open world – a seminal one at that – is another matter. CD Projekt Red, with the help of porting veteran Saber Interactive, is partway through a Switch port of The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt – the game that made it a household name. Over the course of a year, the Polish studio has joined a rush of developers…

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