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EdgeEdge

Edge Xmas 2016

The authority on videogame art, design and play, Edge is the must-have companion for game industry professionals, aspiring game-makers and super-committed hobbyists. Its mission is to celebrate the best in interactive entertainment today and identify the most important developments of tomorrow, providing the most trusted, in-depth editorial in the business via unparalleled access to the developers and technologies that make videogames the world’s most dynamic form of entertainment.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
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$39.99
13 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
twenty-three years on, we finally reach our destination

As the technology advances, so those basic vector graphics give way to polygons with light-sourced shading, texture mapping, transparency and so on. And the ultimate experience is to actually wander around that virtual world and interact with it in three dimensions, using stereo eyephones to see the world and motion sensors to track your position. An extract from the editorial intro of Edge issue three there, from 1993. Its cover may have featured fighting game Rise Of The Robots, but this edition was big on the promise of virtual reality, with “all the experts” insisting that “true VR in your living room or on your desktop is only about 12 months down the line”. In reality it took more than two decades, but interactive technology, fed by the emergence of strange…

access_time6 min.
on or off?

The market didn’t like it, of course. When, on October 20, Nintendo finally unveiled its vision for its next generation of console hardware – a system that functions both as handheld and home console, slotting into a dock connected to a TV – its share price fell 6.6 per cent. The following day it fell again. Out rolled the doom-mongers, pointing out that this was even worse than the 5 per cent dip that followed the Wii U announcement – and we all know how that turned out. Context tells a different story: Nintendo is having a good year, sales down but profits up, the Pokémon Go craze sending its stock soaring, the unveiling on Apple’s stage of Super Mario Run boosting the company’s share price by a further 25…

access_time11 min.
an edge ten

The thousands of pages that have been printed in Edge’s first 300 issues have documented great change. Screenshots show game worlds and characters steadily evolving from angular planes of colour to nuanced places and people, while titles and editorials depict the rise and fall of trends, genres and companies. These incremental processes are constant, but it’s also possible to identify individual moments during Edge’s lifetime that have lead to lasting steps forward. It’s often hard to judge these moments at the time they happen. Take Wii. For a few brief years it was the brightest light in the industry, a piece of hardware that seemed to have rewritten the rules of control and have finally opened videogames into the true mainstream. Producing superlative software and marketing it with laser vision, Nintendo grew…

access_time5 min.
billion-dollar baby

Las Vegas might be famous for its ‘gaming’, but there the term has a very different meaning. Its connection to videogames has so far been limited to the Evolution Championship Series, an annual fighting-game event, and the occasional Halo tournament. That, though, is about to change: a permanent esports venue, owned by Millennial Esports, is soon to throw open its doors. Having recently formed through the merger of digital esports company Pro Gaming League and financial firm Stratton Corp, Millennial Esports had its choices when it came to selecting a location for its first venue. But, as CEO Alex Igelman tells us, “Las Vegas was a no-brainer. Vegas is the entertainment capital of the world and esports is the entertainment of the 21st century.” Igelman hopes that Millennial Esports’ new venue…

access_time1 min.
reign woe island

The Shrouded Isle, developer Kitfox Games explains, is a ‘cult village management simulator’. If nothing else, Kitfox should be applauded for making the management sim genre sound ominous, but there’s an intriguing game lying behind its grimy, monochromatic lime visuals. You must ensure the prosperity of the five families, each one vying for power, which reside in your village – and decree regular (and nonvoluntary) sacrifices along the way in order to appease a cruelly dispassionate god. “In The Shrouded Isle, there is no hope of salvation,” says writer and producer Tanya X Short. “The gods are not here to help and love you – the only god your people know of is to be feared, because it’s apathetic at best.” Every season you must assign tasks to each of the five…

access_time2 min.
soundbytes

“We start with the goals we want to achieve. Power in and of itself is not a goal. The question is, what that power makes possible.” To PlayStation 4 lead system architect Mark Cerny, the answer to that question was, unfortunately, Knack “If democracy is a computer game, and Hillary is completing women’s 100-year quest to get to the Oval Office, it kind of makes sense that this would be the final boss.” John Oliver puts the election race in terms we understand “We are coasting on novelty, and the initial wonder of being something people have never seen before. But we need to start judging ourselves. Not on a curve, but in an absolute sense.” If it helps, Oculus CTO John Carmack, we’re all judging Palmer Luckey “We shouldn’t let gaming turn into an art…

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