Adweek

Adweek March 22, 2021

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The all-new Adweek features news and information for marketing, media and advertising professionals that you can’t find anywhere else. Each issue includes profiles and interviews with top newsmakers, critiques of hot ad campaigns, the latest trends in print, digital and advertising and much more.

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País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Adweek, LLC
Periodicitat:
Weekly
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33 Números

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1 min.
nfl sets new tv deals

The National Football League set eye-popping new rights deals for all its TV packages last Thursday, with new agreements through the 2033 season worth an estimated $10 billion annually. The deals extend NBC, CBS and NBC’s respective Sunday game packages. ESPN’s expanded Monday Night Football agreement allows six Monday games per year to air on ABC and adds ABC to the Super Bowl rotation alongside the other broadcasters for the first time since 2006. ESPN/ABC will air the 2026 and 2030 Super Bowls. The pricey new deal means that the big four broadcasters can rely on much-needed ratings boosts from the NFL through the 2033 season. Five of the top 10 broadcast prime-time shows in total viewers and in the adults 18-49 demo this season are NFL-related because football is one…

1 min.
creativity

Could the secret to making beer packaging more sustainable be found right inside the bottle? Barley, a core ingredient of beer, also produces straw, and Corona is testing a new form of packaging that uses barley straw in a more environmentally friendly packaging design. Developed by AB InBev’s Global Innovation and Technology Center, the packaging has already rolled out in Colombia and will debut next in Argentina. The goal is to adopt the technique globally. A shift at that scale could have massive sustainability implications since the process uses 90% less water than traditional cardboard.…

1 min.
brands

HITTING THE (VIRTUAL) STREETS AT SXSW ONLINE Last week, South by Southwest was hosted on an all-virtual platform from Austin, Texas. It’s the second year that the annual conglomeration of festivals didn’t happen in person, meaning that the city was again deprived of the influx of business that the event usually brings. The virtual alternative also meant a different experience for attendees, who had the option to don a VR headset to walk down fantastical versions of iconic Austin streets or jump on the connected TV app to see mostly prerecorded panels and keynotes. While some of that inspiring content still resonated with marketers, the networking opportunities and brand activations were limited—and it was hard not to feel like SXSW Online was just another Zoom experience.…

3 min.
rebecca allison

While many companies’ plans were completely upended in 2020, the pandemic was more like a blip on the already busy radar of Parallel, the farm-to-distribution cannabis company formerly known as Surterra Wellness. “With the cannabis industry growing like it is, and then you throw in regulation changes at the market level and at the federal level, having Covid come out was just like, ‘That’s this week’s thing. Let’s figure that out and keep going,’” said Rebecca Allison, Parallel’s vp of marketing. That kind of rapidly changing environment is where Allison thrives. The University of Georgia alumna’s first professional experience was an internship with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which she secured by chatting up the person in line behind her at Best Buy. ‘Someone can have 20 years of experience, but if…

1 min.
work in beta

Mother New York is in the process of moving its headquarters. While its staffers continue to work remotely, those who feel comfortable have the option of working from a temporary space called Mother in the Middle. Based in Brooklyn, N.Y., the space will be a place where the agency can experiment with everything from the food offered to modifiable furniture. Katie Longmyer, managing director and partner at Mother New York, said it gives employees the chance to create and collaborate together, while also providing the agency with a glimpse into what the future of work might look like. “It’s a space that has allowed us to open a dialogue within Mother and better understand how comfortable people are with meeting up physically,” Longmyer said.…

3 min.
the future of the office

When it’s safe for staffers of Boston-based Hill Holliday to go back to the office, they’ll be greeted with a different space than what they saw pre-pandemic. The agency is relocating and outfitting a new space—a unique and perhaps daunting challenge considering people have spent the past year proving they don’t actually need an office to work. “We have really tough competition—we need to compete with people’s homes,” Hill Holliday’s chief creative officer Icaro Doria said. According to Doria, he’s tasked the agency’s architectural firm with one goal: “Make it better than home.” He’s not alone in this challenge as agencies consider what a return to the office looks like. Some are reimagining how their workspaces can best be utilized while others are doing away with offices altogether. “A lot of them are…