Australian Country Issue #24.3 June/July 2021

Australian Country is a magazine that lets you escape. This luxurious title delves into the world of sprawling homesteads, charming properties, working farms, contemporary cuisines, tasteful interior design and outdoor living ideas, with everything from antiques and collectables to recipes in between. Australian Country is dedicated to highlighting the best of the Australian country life, made for the people who are passionate about country living by the people who are passionate about country living because we understand that a love of country runs deeper than just a passion for decorating. The magazine provides readers with the inspiration to capture the essence of the country lifestyle, no matter where they live — whether city, coast or country. urchase includes the Digital Edition and News Service. Please stay in touch via our Facebook Page.

País:
Australia
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Universal Wellbeing PTY Limited
Periodicitat:
Bimonthly
2,26 €(IVA inc.)
9,46 €(IVA inc.)
6 Números

en aquest número

1 min.
editor’s letter

At press time, vast swathes of the east coast of Australia were recovering from severe floods that have caused major damage to homes and properties. In some places, that’s on top of years of drought, which is still affl icting many farms and, of course, the fallout from the pandemic and the devastation it has caused for tourism operators, hospitality providers, the arts community and many other businesses. And don’t forget the bushfires that caused unspeakable suffering during the summer of 2019/2020. So it seemed like a good time to check in on some of the regions that were affected by the summer that went up in smoke. Our travel story covers the NSW Southern Highlands, so close to Sydney, yet so far removed in terms of its opportunities for rest…

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1 min.
helping out on this issue ...

BRONTE CAMILLERI, STYLIST & LOCATION SCOUT Bronte’s career began in visual merchandising for major Australian retailers, including R. M. Williams, Myer and Cue. She has been a lecturer on the subject for the tertiary education system, and has worked as overall coordinator on a range of projects from small studio propping to major photo shoots for international corporations such as Nikon, Japan and ING. ROSS WILLIAMS, PHOTOGRAPHER Ross has been a photographer for 30 years, shooting food, wine and commercial and residential architecture, as well as travelling overseas to capture everything from mining projects to aircraft. He relishes the challenge of arriving at a previously unseen location and working on the best way to showcase it. australiancountry.com.au facebook.com/AustralianCountry @australiancountrymag zinio.com pinterest.com/auscountrymag…

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1 min.
baker’s dozen

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3 min.
diary notes

OCTOBER 8 (QLD) LANESCAPE FESTIVAL If you’re planning on visiting the rural town of Goondiwindi in Queensland, perhaps plan your visit to coincide with this terrific twilight carnival. Focused around the charming Bowen Lane, Lanescape Festival showcases works that have been commissioned throughout the year. Expect murals, sculptures, plenty of art display, food vans, local artisan stalls and music. Best of all, it’s free. lanescape.com.au JULY 5-25 (QLD) FLOWERS IN THE DUST EXHIBITION Barcaldine artist Jenny Mace will be exhibiting her works in this beautifully curated exhibition with a purpose at the visitor information centre in the former Globe Hotel. The exhibition will promote the development of the Barcaldine Arid Lands Botanical Park. Jenny’s artworks are an ode to Australian native fauna, particularly the wildflowers of Queensland’s central west, and the watercolour paintings represent a…

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5 min.
the art of country

Allison Bellinger cheerfully admits she knew nothing about running an art gallery when she opened her exhibition space in the centre of Inverell in rural northern NSW. The town is better known for agriculture and gemstones than a passing parade of potential art investors. But the former Sydney lawyer trusted her instincts and long interest in art and aesthetics and, in 2016, launched AK Bellinger Gallery with a sell-out show of works by contemporary Australian artist and three-times Archibald Prize finalist Vanessa Stockard. “I’d bought some of her paintings,” Allison explains. “Through the years, we’d become friends and she generously offered to give me my first show. There was real local interest in what I was doing, and opening night was wall-to-wall with people. Vanessa and her husband came up for…

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4 min.
shirt story long

Sue Holmwood candidly confesses she could barely take up a hem when she launched a handmade shirt business in the 1990s. But survival is a strong motivator and, through hard work and determination, she developed a brand that sold all over Australia and was so successful that it supported her children through boarding school. Sue grew up in Canowindra in the NSW central west, where her parents ran sheep and grew wheat. Her family’s association with the historic town on the banks of the Belubula River goes back to the earliest European settlement of the district as her ancestor was one of the region’s founding fathers, convict John Grant. He came to Australia at the age of 18 and was assigned to emancipist surgeon Dr William Redfern, who made him overseer…

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