Bicycling November - December 2016

Since 1962, Bicycling has been inspiring people to get more out of their cycling passion. Get Bicycling digital magazine subscription today for action-packed issues filled with proven secrets to go faster, stronger, longer. Increase your stamina; buy the best gear for your money; locate a great ride; improve your performance; perfect your technique; fuel your passion.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Hearst
Periodicitat:
Bimonthly
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22,91 €(IVA inc.)
6 Números

en aquest número

2 min.
the selection

ONE The community of cycling forms the center of my friendships and my day-to-day life, and is the key driver of my improvements as a rider. I read a reliable study recently that said about 21 percent of cyclists only ride alone—missing out on that connection. Some can’t shape their lives around set schedules, or are put off by the character or politics (or mandatory ugly kit) of local groups. Joining the Rapha Cycling Club is a way to belong while also reaching beyond your neighborhood. Among the most notable fiscal paybacks of the $200 annual membership are free coffee at any of the worldwide clubs (easy to see cyclists drinking back their membership fee in a year) and the ability to book a $25 daily rental of a high-end Canyon…

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1 min.
the one thing that changed it all

Once I heard about Everesting—climbing the total height of Mount Everest in a single ride, out and back on the same route—I couldn’t stop thinking about that number: 29,092 feet. I did my first attempt on Sentinel Peak outside Tucson. I accumulated around 21,000 feet of elevation in 14 hours. I went through every emotion possible. There were laps where I was crying. Although my attempt was unsuccessful—the weather was unseasonably warm, I got stung by a bee—I learned that I can be alone with myself for hours. Since then I’ve done more long solo rides, like the 40-mile dirt road up the backside of Mount Lemmon. I’ve found that the physical pain of cycling helps me clear my head. Riding keeps me sane and strong. JUSTIN WEEKS, 24 / BIKE…

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19 min.
yaaaaaaaas! bikes make america more awesome

No. 1: America’s Most Bike-Crazy Mayor Bicycles mean business as well as fitness, says Fort Worth’s Betsy Price For bike love with a Texas twang, head to Fort Worth for one of Mayor Betsy Price’s rolling town hall meetings. Each week, the 66-year-old hosts a casual, 7- to 8-mile ride to meet residents—some on their own bikes, others using B-Cycle bike share—and chat about their ideas on how to improve the city. “When you put spandex on a body like mine, people will tell you just about anything,” she says. On weekends, you might spot Price at a group ride, answering questions from new cyclists. The mayor got into cycling more than 40 years ago, when she and her husband bought bikes to celebrate their first anniversary. In 2011, she brought her passion…

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1 min.
the 50 best bike cities

Every two years we sift through Census and department of transportation data on more than 100 cities, consult with experts from organizations such as People for Bikes and the League of American Bicyclists, and talk with bike advocates and everyday riders to identify the 50 most bike-friendly towns in the United States. We look at everything from miles of bike lanes to the percentage of cycling commuters who are female—a key indicator of safe bike infrastructure—to the number of cyclist-friendly bars. The goal is not only to help you plan your next relocation but also to inspire riders and municipalities to advocate for more of the forward-thinking changes you’re reading about on these pages. (“Shaming works,” admits one city planner we spoke to this year.) For detailed info on this…

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1 min.
the 2016 bike cities hall of shame

Not. Funny. // An SUV in Columbus, Ohio's satirical July 4th Doo Dah Parade displayed a bike on the hood, a pair of legs sticking out of the sunroof, and a sign that read, “I’ll share the road when you follow the rules.” #BikeLaneFail // After widening Austin Bluffs Parkway, a six-lane arterial, Colorado Springs striped a questionmark- shaped bike lane that forced cyclists to stop at an off-ramp. The city’s transportation manager told the Colorado Springs Gazette that the idea was to tell cyclists that it is their responsibility to yield to motorists, and that “you might want to be a fairly experienced cyclist before tackling Austin Bluffs.” Blaming the victim // In July, Matthew von Ohlen was killed while riding in a Brooklyn bike lane, by a hitand- run driver…

2 min.
the pasta sauce inspired by cycling

MAKE THIS RIDE FUEL MY DAD, ROBERT RODALE, who bought BICYCLING magazine in 1978, watched his first track cycling race at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City, where he competed on the American skeet shooting team. He came back determined to build a velodrome near our home, in Trexlertown, Pennsylvania. So we went to Montreal to see a sixday race. We went to Vienna, Austria, for the junior world championships. And after my dad opened his velodrome, lots of cyclists came through our house. When I was 16, I served as Eddy Merckx’s driver. (Fortunately he enjoyed risk, so we got along fine.) Eventually my dad bought a house where visiting racers could stay. My sister Heidi was hired to cook for them and sometimes I helped. I still remember stirring…

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