Bon Appetit

Bon Appetit

August 2021

Bon Appétit focuses on what's "now" in the world of food, drink, and entertaining, while still giving readers valuable cooking tools, tips, and most of all, recipes. This food lifestyle publication looks at life through the lens of food & cooking in, dining out, travel, entertainment, shopping and design.

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País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Conde Nast US
Periodicitat:
Monthly
6,13 €(IVA inc.)
17,53 €(IVA inc.)
10 Números

en aquest número

1 min.
hudson

If we’re hanging with friends from out of town, we’d meet them at the train with breakfast sandwiches from Kitty’s. Then we’d take them to the Hudson Farmers Market (open only on Saturdays) to say hello to our shop vendors, like Sparrowbush Farm, a bakery that makes fresh breads with organic grains it grows and mills. Then we’d check out cool stores on Warren Street: Batterby House, a charming kitchen shop, and Red Chair, which is stocked with beautiful French antiques. At this point it’s time for coffee so we’d get cappuccinos at Supernatural Coffee. For a late lunch it’s Cafe Mutton—chef Shaina Loew-Banayan serves unpretentious food, like country pâté sandwiches. Then we’d get in the car and take our friends to historic site Olana for the most incredible view…

1 min.
grill these cheeses

If the idea of cheese over an open fire sounds bizarre, it simply means you’re not choosing the right kind. A good grilling cheese will char but not ooze through the grates. Here are three to try. Paneer This creamy non-aged Indian cheese is made from curdled buffalo or cow’s milk and doesn’t melt, so it holds up on the grill. Use it as a medium for all kinds of marinades, wet or dry. Our favorite brand is Sach—ethically sourced and extra rich ($8 for 6 oz.; sachfoods.com). Halloumi Salty, semihard, and unripened, Cyprus’s most famous dairy export is made with a blend of goat and sheep milks, and its high melting point means no mess. Serve it on a bun with your favorite toppings a la our Seared Squash and Halloumi Burger on…

1 min.
stay fresh

No Bad Seeds These fragile fruits are super thin-skinned, so one bad berry can ruin the whole bunch. Remove any that are already bruised, slimy, or spoiled. But don’t waste the squished sweeties! Save them for smoothies. Spa Treatment Wash berries as soon as you get them home, instead of just before you plan to use them. A quick bath in diluted white vinegar (3 cups water to 2 Tbsp. vinegar) will kill any existing mold spores or bacteria on your fruit. Rinse thoroughly to remove any lingering vinegar taste and dry gently to avoid bruising. We Need Space Crowded berries get smushed easily. Let them breathe by storing them in a wide, flat container lined with paper towels. Cover with a loose-fitting lid to let excess moisture (which breeds bacteria) escape.…

1 min.
stacks on stacks

The Patties These are a 50-50 blend of tocino, pork belly cured in annatto and garlic, and longanisa, a type of sausage found across the Philippines. Smashing the patties enhances the slightly sweet flavor both meats are prized for—something Cunanan learned as a burger joint line cook in his 20s. The Bun Cunanan and Dungca couldn’t do brioche (too sweet for the patties) or typically soft potato buns (too gummy after soaking up the patty juices). Their business partner, Arturo Mei, recommended the sturdy, savory potato buns from Ottenberg’s Bakers in Baltimore. Just right. The Pineapple “In my experience, if you’re a Pacific Islander, say from Guam, the Philippines, or Hawaii, you always want pork with pineapple,” Cunanan says. Sliced thinner than the canned stuff and quickly charred on the grill, fresh pineapple rings “add…

2 min.
a condensed guide to the sweet (and sour) world of: cherries

The 101 What Are They? Cherries are stone fruit, in season during early summer in Washington and California and late summer in Michigan. BUYING Look for shiny, plump cherries on the bigger side, without blemishes or bruises. Don’t worry about whether the stem is intact—that doesn’t affect how good the cherry will be. STORING Eat them ASAP and keep them on the counter; they’ll get mealy in the fridge. Sour cherries have 36 hours (they’re sensitive, okay?); sweet cherries have 3 to 4 days. SWEET AND SOUR There are hundreds of varieties of sweet cherries, from Bing to Rainier, though it’s hard to tell the difference in a taste test. But there’s a big difference between sweet and sour (also known as tart) cherries: SWEET CHERRIES are for snacking, contain more sugar, and are often bigger and sturdier than tart…

1 min.
spicy braised eggplant noodles

4 SERVINGS Kosher salt12 oz. dried wide rice noodles3 Tbsp. gochujang (Korean hot pepper paste)1 Tbsp. white or yellow miso6 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divided1½ lb. medium eggplant, preferably Japanese, sliced ¾" thick6 garlic cloves, thinly sliced1 1" piece ginger, peeled, finely chopped2 Tbsp. double-concentrated tomato paste2 Tbsp. unsalted butter3 scallions, thinly sliced¼ cup chopped salted dry-roasted peanuts 1. Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a simmer. Remove pot from heat and stir in noodles. Let soak, stirring often, until very al dente. Drain, reserving 1 cup noodle cooking liquid. Rinse noodles under cold running water. 2. Mix gochujang and miso in a small bowl, gradually adding 1½ cups warm water, until smooth. 3. Meanwhile, heat 3 Tbsp. oil in a large skillet, preferably nonstick, over medium-high. Add eggplant and drizzle…