Great Walks

Great Walks December/January 2020

Great Walks is packed with gear guides, product reviews, advice on the best travel destinations, inspiring real-life accounts from seasoned walkers and practical information on specific walks and their accompanying maps. From features on the country’s best bushwalks to reviews of the latest outdoor gear, Great Walks is about discovering our amazing national parks and coastline – anywhere where there’s a walking track. Filled with lush photos, detailed walk notes and aspirational overseas destinations, Great Walks is designed to entertain and inspire.

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País:
Australia
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Yaffa Publishing Group PTY LTD
Periodicitat:
Bimonthly
3,94 €(IVA inc.)
23,04 €(IVA inc.)
7 Números

en aquest número

2 min.
seasons greetings!

WELCOME to issue 86 of Great Walks featuring our annual New Year/New Walks special where we showcase walking trails opening up this year and new destinations from some of our favourite walking tour operators. We managed to do Sydney’s Bondi to Manly Walk (pg 14) just before its official opening and are grateful for the walk’s organisers in helping us out with this. Everybody is hoping big things for the Bondi to Manly Walk and many think it could be Australia’s version of Cinque Terre that follows the gorgeous coastline of the Italian Riveria. Here’s hoping. Other walks in this issue include Karijini NP (pg66), ten of the best day walks east of Melbourne (pg62), the Portuguese Coastal Camino (Pg54) and Great Britain’s famous Coast to Coast Walk (pg34) with its…

2 min.
walk & talk

A walk to remember II I loved your Camino special on the last issue. My best friend and I have been toying with the idea of doing one of the great pilgrim walks in Europe and after reading Patti Miller’s story (Slow travel and the kindness of strangers, GRW Annual) about all the amazing experiences and wonderful people you’re bound to meet on the walk we pencilled in some dates and are about to book our flights. Now the next big challenge will be what to carry – and what to leave behind! Susie Smith, Coolangatta, Qld Hi Susie, you and your best friend are going to have an amazing time on your pilgrim walk. As for what to pack. The first rule is ‘less is more’! – Ed Plan of action I was very…

1 min.
kanchenjunga circuit, nepal

This 20-day circuit walk is one of Nepal’s most famous walks but less popular than Everest Base Camp or Annapurna. Accommodation is in tea-houses, small lodges offering basic food and amenities so you won’t need a tent. You can walk it guided or self-guided. Kanchenjunga is towards the far eastern part of Nepal and is protected under the Kanchenjunga Conservation Area Project which preserves several species such as snow leopard, black bear, red panda. The word Kanchenjunga comes from the Tibetan word referring to ‘Five great treasures in the snow’ symbolising its five peaks as gold, silver, precious stones, grain and holy scriptures. And as this photo attests, the walking is spectacular. You’ll see central, south and north Kanchenjunga, as well as Yalung Kang, Mt. Jannu, Makalu, Lhotse and Mt.…

3 min.
preventing hikers knee

IT doesn’t matter if you’re doing a local day walk or taking on something mammoth like the Camino de Santiago, knee pain will to turn a beautiful day out into a nightmare. And unfortunately, it is an incredibly common issue for hikers. If you ever experienced this, chances are you have done some research on how to stop it. But more than likely you have come across the same advice I did… “Use a knee brace”, “tape up your knee” or “get some orthotics”. And while these things can help in the short term, they are only really a band aid solution. Unfortunately, they don’t do anything to fix the underlying issues. The second you stop using them, the pain comes back. And then you are stuck in a never-ending loop……

8 min.
rule britannia

THEY puffed up the hill towards me, straining under their huge packs. After a 20km day, the effort clearly showed on their faces and in their gait. I’d encountered these siblings almost every day of my walk so far, and every day I’d tease them by casually dropping the name of that night’s Bed & Breakfast before skipping ahead, day pack light on my shoulders. The ‘Sisters Brothers’, as I christened them, were doing the hard yards, humping all their gear and camping every night. Part of me was jealous (although not the feet or back parts, obviously) as that’s how I ought to have been tackling the Coast to Coast, my home on my back, but thanks to a dodgy leg I’d done the sensible thing for once. I’d…

6 min.
help is on hand

SLIP, drop, SNAP! That’s how our fourth day in the stunning Victorian High Country changed its course from one of a simple final descent to the trailhead, to something quite other. After hearing one of my fellow walkers call my name, I looked up to see only Margot’s backpack lying on the ground, her crumpled body on the other side, I knew something must be wrong. We’d left the MUMC Hut (1600m) only 20 minutes earlier and were coming down the North-West Spur of Mt Feathertop. The track leaves immediately begins a descent of 1140m over 7km, to emerge near the Trout Farm in Harrietville. Often overgrown, it hugs the ridgeline leading through towering eucalypt forest and regrowth from the 2013 bushfires. It is one of the more difficult and less…