Great Walks August/Sept 2021

Great Walks is packed with gear guides, product reviews, advice on the best travel destinations, inspiring real-life accounts from seasoned walkers and practical information on specific walks and their accompanying maps. From features on the country’s best bushwalks to reviews of the latest outdoor gear, Great Walks is about discovering our amazing national parks and coastline – anywhere where there’s a walking track. Filled with lush photos, detailed walk notes and aspirational overseas destinations, Great Walks is designed to entertain and inspire.

País:
Australia
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Yaffa Publishing Group PTY LTD
Periodicitat:
Bimonthly
3,86 €(IVA inc.)
22,53 €(IVA inc.)
7 Números

en aquest número

2 min.
on the up

RECENTLY I found out that my name Brent is old English for ‘high place’ or – more aptly for this issue of Great Walks – ‘steep hill’. As you’ll see screaming on this cover the words ‘Climb that hill!’, because more often than not any bushwalk will involve going up – and sometimes up and up... and up! And there’s only one way you’ll reach the top of that damn hill (and maybe the five or 10 in front of it!) and that’s putting one sure foot in front of the other and moving forward. Our new writer for the Words of Wisdom column Katrina Hemingway (pg98) knows all about climbing hills, having walked PNG’s infamous Kokoda Track, and the Pennine Way and Wainwright’s Coast to Coast Walk both in Britain,…

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1 min.
the colorado trail, usa

When the international borders reopen in 2022 this is a walk you should put on your bucket list! Stretching 912km through the Colorado Rockies, from the Mile High city of Denver in Colorado’s north to Durango in the southwest is the iconic Colorado Trail. Built over 30 years ago and maintained by Colorado Trail Foundation volunteers, it’s one of the country’s highest multiday walks, with an average elevation of 3048m and a high point of 4053m over Coney Summit peak. Walkers enjoy the spectacularly diverse wilderness areas, canyons, mountain ranges, pristine lakes and fields of wildflowers, and wildlife, are encouraged to adhere to the ‘Care for Colorado’s seven principles of conservation and sustainability. The timeframe to hike the trail is narrow because of the deep snowpack and high chance of snow…

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2 min.
mum knows best

FOR her birthday, Mum decided she wanted to hike Tassie’s Overland Track. Six days of hiking and camping, unguided, in the Tasmanian wilderness? Sounded fabulous to us: Mel (Mum’s best friend), Leigh (Mel’s husband), Max (my boyfriend), and me. Since we hadn’t pre-booked our ferry out for our final day, we thought we’d walk the extra 17km from Narcissus Bay to the Lake St Clair Visitor Centre. For five days, Tassie showcased why it’s so popular with walkers. Not a hint of that rain we’d been warned could last the whole trip. A ranger we encountered on the trail told us rain was forecast for late on the 5th day. Given that was our walk-out day, we weren’t worried. On the 5th, sections of the trail completely disappeared into seas of fronds…

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8 min.
hump day

“In going round this lake, Kilroy who was ahead of the party stopped, saying he saw a beautiful bird, which he recommended me to shoot to add to the collection. My gun being loaded with slugs in one barrel and ball in the other, I stopped the camel to get at the shot belt which I could not get without his laying down. Whilst Mr Gill was unfastening it, I was screwing the ramrod into the wad over the slugs, standing close alongside of the camel. At this moment the camel gave a lurch to one side and caught his pack on the lock of my gun, which discharged the barrel; the contents of which first took off the middle finger of my right hand and entered my left cheek by…

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8 min.
bigger than ben hur

FREEEEEDOM! It wasn’t until the aeroplane door made that comforting screwing-shut noise that I actually believed it – after twice being rescheduled due to COVID-19 outbreaks, I was finally leaving NSW for the first time in over a year. Not that I was bored of my home state – in the last 12 months I’d seen more of it than ever before and loved it – but when your primary passion is bushwalking, Tasmania will always beckon. My original two-week, multi-hike itinerary had, thanks to the delays, been reduced to a single walk – a four-day exploration of Walls of Jerusalem National Park with Tasmanian Expeditions. But what a walk! As an Overland Track veteran I was keen to see more of central Tassie, and the soaring cliffs and alpine moors…

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8 min.
on tarkine time

I wake in my wilderness cottage in the historic hamlet of Corinna: the gateway to the Tarkine. Overnight rain danced like a possum on a hot tin roof before the ear-bleeding screeches of a Tasmanian devil fight. There is no mobile reception, nor internet access. Here, time ticks to a different beat. It’s a dark, cloudy dawn. It’s wet. It’s off-season. And it’s perfect. From this remote off-grid eco-village, I’m about to explore some of the 447,000 hectares of the Tarkine’s renowned biodiversity. Enchanted forests The settlement of Corinna began in 1881 as a base for miners and piners in search of riches. Leading directly from the lodge is this bewitching forest walk bordering the Whyte River, which was once rich in gold. However, by 1919, mining dried up and the town…

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