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Roman Emperors

Roman Emperors

Roman Emperors

The fighting had stopped. Years of civil war, death and betrayal had ended, and one man emerged victorious from the fray. The adopted son of the once-great Julius Caesar was bestowed the title of Augustus by the Senate, and he ushered in a new era of rule: the Roman Empire. In All About History Roman Emperors, it’s time to meet the people who were charged with leading one of the greatest civilisations of the ancient world. Uncover the depraved reigns of Caligula and Nero, go on a Christian crusade with Constantine, and meet the rulers of the East who kept the Roman Empire alive for over 1,000 years. So untangle the family trees, prepare for brutual assassinations and bloody coups, and decide for yourself who really was the greatest emperor of Ancient Rome.

País:
United Kingdom
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Future Publishing Ltd
Periodicitat:
One-off
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1 min.
welcome to roman emperors

The fighting had stopped. Years of civil war, death and betrayal had ended, and one man emerged victorious from the fray. The adopted son of the once-great Julius Caesar was bestowed the title of Augustus by the Senate, and he ushered in a new era of rule: the Roman Empire. In All About History Roman Emperors, it’s time to meet the people who were charged with leading one of the greatest civilisations of the ancient world. Uncover the depraved reigns of Caligula and Nero, go on a Christian crusade with Constantine, and meet the rulers of the East who kept the Roman Empire alive for over 1,000 years. So untangle the family trees, prepare for brutual assassinations and bloody coups, and decide for yourself who really was the greatest emperor…

7 min.
the dynasties of the roman empire

For four centuries of its existence, Rome was ruled by nine incredibly powerful dynasties and it was under their rule that the nation rose to the height of its power and eventually saw it fall into the hands of Eastern masters. The first of these eras, the Principate, was the first to emerge after the end of the Republic where Rome expanded with military might into one of the most powerful nations of the world. The Principate began with the formation of the position of emperor, where the democratic structure of the republic was cast aside and the power of the entire realm was passed into the hands of a single man. The first of those men, Augustus, was mindful of the dangers of plunging Rome into a political world that…

9 min.
27 bce - 14 ce augustus

Octavian was brought up during the civil war that he was destined to end. Born in 63 BCE to a relatively obscure patrician family, the silver lining was that he was related to the Caesars. His mother, Atai, was Julius Caesar’s niece, and after the death of his father, Octavian was raised by his grandmother, who was Caesar’s sister, Julia Caesaris. But it wouldn’t be until 47 BCE that Octavian and the great Julius Caesar would meet. Aged 16, it was time for the boy to don the toga virilis and become a man. Using family connections, he managed to take on responsibilities, and one of them was going to help his great-uncle Caesar fight in Hispania. However, his journey went somewhat awry when he became shipwrecked on the way there,…

1 min.
all about augustus

BANISHED FAMILY When Augustus found out that his only child, Julia, had been sleeping with men out of wedlock – including one of Mark Antony’s sons – he had her exiled to Ventotene and they never saw each other again. THE ROMAN WIFE Augustus’ third wife, Livia, served as the archetypal Roman woman and wife. However, Livia was set on ensuring that her son from another marriage would rule after Augustus, and she succeeded – Tiberius ruled from 14 CE. FAMOUS LAST WORDS On his deathbed, Augustus’ last words were reportedly: “I found Rome a city of clay but left it a city of marble.” While the emperor had achieved this, his wife said his last words were: “Have I played the part well? Then applaud as I exit.” AUGUSTUS' MAUSOLEUM Augustus built his tomb in 28…

1 min.
rome's first first lady

In a world run by men, wives were supposed to sit in the background, offering their husbands support while running the household. To the public, that’s exactly what Livia seemed to be doing. The third wife of Augustus, she would be by his side for his entire reign, but behind her beauty lay brains. The ultimate goal for Livia seemed to be getting one of her sons to sit on imperial throne. As Augustus had no sons of his own, he would have to adopt his heir, and Livia worked tirelessly until her son Tiberius became the next in line. In fact, some accused her of poisoning Augustus to get Tiberius into the top job faster after the emperor’s death in 14 CE. Livia became the blueprint for the empresses that would…

1 min.
tiberius 14-37 ce

The great Augustus had been Tiberius’ stepfather and at the start, Tiberius wasn’t the one who was supposed to take his place. However, as the other candidates for the position of emperor died over the years, the burden finally fell on Tiberius’ shoulders. His reign started well, but over time he became more unpopular, eventually being accused of tyranny thanks to his use of Sejanus, the head of his Praetorian Guard. In response, the emperor relocated to the island of Capri in the Bay of Naples in 27 CE, and it was there that he stayed for the rest of his life. Before he died, he made his adoptive grandson Gaius, later known as Caligula, and his actual grandson Gemellus joint heirs to the empire.…