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AMERICAN THEATREAMERICAN THEATRE

AMERICAN THEATRE

July/August 2019

THE ONLY NATIONAL MAGAZINE THAT PROVIDES COMPREHENSIVE COVERAGE OF THE WORLD OF THEATRE BOTH IN THE U.S. AND ABROAD. INCLUDES 5 COMPLETE PLAYSCRIPTS EACH YEAR, ARTIST PROFILES, AND MUCH MORE. TWO SPECIAL ISSUES PUBLISHED EACH YEAR "THEATRE TRAINING" (JANUARY) AND "SEASON PREVIEW" (OCTOBER).

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United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Theatre Communications Group
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american theatre

Published by Theatre Communications Group EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Rob Weinert-Kendt MANAGING EDITOR Russell M. Dembin SENIOR EDITOR Diep Tran ASSOCIATE EDITOR Allison Considine EDITORIAL INTERNS Steph Golub Caitlyn Halvorsen CREATIVE DIRECTOR Kitty Suen Spennato ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR Monet Cogbill PLAYSCRIPT DIRECTOR Kathy Sova DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING Carol Van Keuren DIGITAL ADVERTISING MANAGER Marcus Gualberto MARKETING COORDINATOR Michelle Prado CIRCULATION MANAGER Carissa Cordes PUBLISHER Terence Nemeth FOUNDING EDITOR Jim O’Quinn EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Teresa Eyring DEPUTY DIRECTOR AND CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Adrian Budhu SINCE 1961, THEATRE COMMUNICATIONS GROUP, THE NATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR U.S. THEATRE, HAS EXISTED TO STRENGTHEN, NURTURE, AND PROMOTE THE PROFESSIONAL NOT-FOR-PROFIT THEATRE.…

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editor’s note

ONE DIVIDING LINE THAT’S OFTEN POSITED ABOUT NARRATIVE art forms might be summed up as visual vs. verbal. It’s a common formulation that film is a visual medium and theatre a verbal one, or at least that each occupies a roughly opposite place on a continuum between those two poles. There are elements of truth in this popular dichotomy, but not a lot, I would argue. The main difference between recorded and live media, it seems to me, is neatly suggested by those descriptors: One is packaged and predetermined, often intimate in feeling but fixed in its outcome; the other is blessedly, unnervingly indeterminate, simultaneously distanced from a crowd’s gaze and irreducibly immediate. But there’s another important thing the visual/verbal contrast leaves out: the aural element. The sound of plays (and…

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contributors

“I’ve worked in and written about many aspects of theatre, but sound and acoustics were new territory for me, as I think they are for a lot of people,” says Naveen Kumar, the author of this issue’s feature on theatre acoustics (p. 20), who is a New York City-based arts and entertainment writer and theatre critic for Towleroad. Kumar, whose work has also been published in outlets such as The New York Times, GQ, and the Daily Beast, adds, “The designers and acousticians I spoke to were so generous and eloquent about a craft that can seem altogether ineffable; reporting this story was the best kind of crash course. I’ll certainly never listen to a show the same way again.” Dara McBride, who pens this issue’s Strategies piece on City Lights…

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big little audience

AS THE BROADWAY SEASON WRAPPED THIS year, the Broadway League announced record attendance of more than 14 million for productions in New York City and Touring Broadway reported 18.5 million attendees across the U.S. and Canada. Meanwhile the most recent Theatre Facts report from Theatre Communications Group estimated gross attendance in not-for-profit resident theatres at 44 million. Combined, these stats suggest there are, give or take, 75 million admissions to professional theatre offerings across the country annually. That’s impressive! While the bulk of growth in Broadway attendance may well be attributed to a fraction of all productions running, the more-or-less steady attendance in the resident theatre field represents a mix of theatres where attendance increased, temporarily declined, or stayed simply flat. Indeed a pressing topic in the resident theatre community this year…

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july/august almanac

95 YEARS AGO (1924) Helen Hayes appears in the Broadway debut of Dancing Mothers. In Edgar Selwyn and Edmund Goulding’s piece, Mary Young portrays a society woman who teaches a lesson to her flapper daughter (Hayes) and philanderer husband (Henry Stephenson) by stepping out herself. The New York Times’ chilly review praises the cast—especially Hayes and the other leads—for doing “everything possible for the play.” 85 YEARS AGO (1934) Future writer, director, and actor Bill Gunn is born in Philadelphia. Among Gunn’s plays will be Marcus in the High Grass; Johnnas, whose screen version will earn Gunn an Emmy; and Black Picture Show. His final stage work, The Forbidden City, will premiere Off-Broadway at the Public Theater a day after Gunn dies at 59 in 1989. Joseph Papp, head of the Public and…

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nataki garrett poised to lead

NATAKI GARRETT BEGAN HER POST AS THE Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s sixth artistic director in April, and she’ll officially succeed Bill Rauch in the role in August. She hardly had a chance to begin preparing for the 2020 season before she dove into rehearsals as the director of Christina Anderson’s How to Catch Creation (which opens there July 23). Garrett most recently served as acting artistic director of the Denver Center for the Performing Arts (DCPA) Theatre Company during its 18-month leadership transition from Kent Thompson to Chris Coleman. As the former associate dean and the co-head of the undergraduate acting program at California Institute of the Arts (CalArts) School of Theater, Garrett is known as a champion of new work as well as a savvy arts administrator. ROB WEINERT-KENDT: Congratulations! This…

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