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Anglo SaxonsAnglo Saxons

Anglo Saxons

Anglo Saxons

"When William the Conqueror won on the battlefield in 1066, he didn’t just usurp a country’s throne – he personally oversaw the end of a vibrant and lively era of British history. He stamped out every last trace of it that he could, but no matter how hard he tried, the legacy of the Anglo-Saxons would live on. In All About History Book of the Anglo-Saxons, uncover how seven separate kingdoms slowly joined together, and find out why King Alfred became known as ‘the Great’. Explore what life was really like, and meet the deadly Viking raiders who managed to conquer part of England. Get up close and personal with the final Anglo-Saxon kings, and reveal what really happened in the last days before everything changed forever…"

País:
United Kingdom
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Future Publishing Ltd
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access_time1 min.
anglo saxons

when William the Conqueror won on the battlefield in 1066, he didn’t just usurp a country’s throne – he personally oversaw the end of a vibrant and lively era of British history. He stamped out every last pocket of reistance that he could, but no matter how hard he tried, the legacy of the Anglo-Saxons would live on. In All About History Book of the Anglo-Saxons, uncover how seven separate kingdoms slowly joined together, and find out why King Alfred became known as ‘the Great’. Explore what life was really like, and meet the deadly Viking raiders who managed to conquer part of England. Get up close and personal with the final Anglo-Saxon kings, and discover what really happened in the last days before everything changed forever……

access_time1 min.
anglo saxons

Editorial Editor Katharine Marsh Design Katy Stokes & Andy Downes Editorial Director Jon White Senior Art Editor Andy Downes Cover images Getty Images, Alamy Photography All copyrights and trademarks are recognised and respected Advertising Media packs are available on request Commercial Director Clare Dove clare.dove@futurenet.com International Head of Print Licensing Rachel Shaw licensing@futurenet.com Circulation Head of Newstrade Tim Mathers Production Head of Production Mark Constance Production Project Manager Clare Scott Advertising Production Manager Joanne Crosby Digital Editions Controller Jason Hudson Production Managers Keely Miller, Nola Cokely, Vivienne Calvert, Fran Twentyman Management Chief Content Officer Aaron Asadi Commercial Finance Director Dan Jotcham Head of Art & Design Greg Whitaker Printed by William Gibbons, 26 Planetary Road, Willenhall, West Midlands, WV13 3XT Distributed by Marketforce, 5 Churchill Place, Canary Wharf, London, E14 5HU www.marketforce.co.uk Tel: 0203 787 9001…

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origins of the anglo-saxons

In the 6th century, a British cleric named Gildas wrote, in elegant Latin, a jeremiad against the corrupt and decadent rulers of his people who, through their sins, had called God’s vengeance down upon them and their realms. That vengeance took the form of blond-haired, moustachioed warriors. The book Gildas wrote was called De Excidio Britanniae (On the Ruin of Britain) and it’s the only contemporary source we have for what was happening in Britain in the two centuries after the Romans left in 410 CE. Those blond warriors were Angles and Saxons – Germanic-speaking peoples who came from the flat, marshy regions of what are today northern Germany and southern Denmark. According to Gildas, they had been invited to the country as mercenaries and then had turned on their employer,…

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the once and future king

The legendary image of Arthur, the once and future king, who will return in England’s direst need to heroically fight against any enemies, is somewhat undercut by the fact that, if he existed at all, Arthur actually fought against the English as a champion of the native Britons, the people who would become the Welsh. But Arthur’s very existence is a moot point. The earliest definite reference to him is in the Historia Brittonum (History of the Britons), which was written in Wales around 830, so at least three centuries after when he was supposed to have lived. In the Historia, Arthur is the dux bellorum (duke of battles) rather than a king, who leads the Britons to 12 victories over the Anglo-Saxons, the last being at Mount Badon. This is…

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the seven kingdoms

Britain was a very different place in the chaotic centuries after the Roman legions left in 410 CE. With the breakdown of the centralised Roman administration, the country dissolved into innumerable petty kingdoms, many now completely lost to memory, contending with each other for short-lived dominance. Into this mix came the Anglo-Saxons, sailing over the North Sea and using the rivers and estuaries of east and south Britain as their highways into this new country where they were carving out kingdoms. Roads were few and often dangerous. The sea and rivers provided much surer and safer means of travel. These bands of warriors established new kingdoms and brought their families over the North Sea to join them, but they fought as enthusiastically among themselves as they fought with their British…

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northumbria

The clue is in the name; Northumbria was the Anglo-Saxon kingdom north of the Humber. At its peak it was the largest and most powerful Anglo-Saxon kingdom and, through being home to Bede for all his life, it is the best recorded kingdom up to the 8th century. Northumbria demonstrates in its history the consolidation of smaller kingdoms into larger polities, for it came about through the forced union of Bernicia, with its royal stronghold at Bamburgh, and Deira, centred on the old Roman city of York. According to the surviving king lists, Bernicia was founded in 547 by Ida – hence the kings of Bernicia were called the Idings – when he captured Bamburgh. For half a century, the Idings fought desperately to retain their precarious hold on the coast,…

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