BIKE

BIKE April 2021

Añadir a favoritos

BIKE is packed with road tests of new bikes and inspirational riding stories, with fantastic places, amazing races and extraordinary people. Created by a passionate and expert team of motorcycle riders, Bike makes you feel part of the amazing motorcycling world. Our three main areas of content are... Road tests: We ride and test all the latest bikes, from tourers to retros. Riding: We take motorcycles to the four corners of the UK, and the four corners of the world Extraordinary travel stories: amazing races, extraordinary events and astonishing bike people.

Leer Más
País:
United Kingdom
Idioma:
English
Editor:
H BAUER PUBLISHING LIMITED
Periodicidad:
Monthly
COMPRAR NÚMERO
4,05 €(IVA inc.)
SUSCRIBIRSE
41,09 €(IVA inc.)
12 Números

en este número

1 min.
hello

Nothing lasts forever, but it feels a bit odd that after all these years Honda are now without a V4 powered machine in their road bike range. No VFs, VFRs, RVFs or Pan Europeans. I’ve got happy memories of great rides on all of them. Equally odd for those of us who remember the 1990s World Superbike tussles between Honda V4s and Ducati V-twins is that it’s now the Italians who are the standard bearers for V4 road bikes. I’m hoping to make fresh memories of great rides on the new Multistrada. We’ve always understood that there is something gratuitously indulgent about a V4 engine. The road bike benefits may be marginal – it’s essentially down to packaging – but the knowledge that they cost more to make than an inline four,…

3 min.
speed limit increase

One criticism of the old Speed Triple was that it was barely a step up in performance from the 765 Street Triple. Well, the new one nails that. The all new bike makes a claimed 178bhp and is 10kg lighter than the old Speedy, pitching it directly at KTM’s loopy Super Duke R and BMW’s latest S1000R. Triumph’s chief engineer Stuart Wood explains the thinking… » What parts are carried over from the 1050 engine? Absolutely none. Every single component of the motorcycle is completely new. Crankshaft, conrods, pistons, crank cases, cylinder head, gearbox, frame, suspension, clutch… » How has the engine changed? We’re now at a 90mm bore, where previously we were 79, and the stroke is 60.8mm, which is shorter than previously (71.4mm). We’ve got an engine we can rev higher, and…

3 min.
less is more?

After a Busa-less two years, Suzuki have corrected their aberration and revealed a revamped model that’s essentially the old one with new electronics, brakes and styling. Though the engine has received dozens of changes, many seem aimed at getting it through Euro5 emission regulations – fundamentals such as bore, stroke and compression ratio all remain the same, but the midrange is stronger and top-end power is down by 7bhp to 187bhp. And the major changes are... ‘According to Suzuki power only starts to lag the older version at around 9000rpm. By then you’re usually in prison anyway’ MORE MIDRANGE Although Busa addicts will no doubt be disappointed by the lack of power hike (six-cylinders, 1500cc and turbos were rumoured) the changes will almost certainly make it a better road bike. According to Suzuki’s…

2 min.
the rule of three

Yes, this new special edition from Ural is one of the coolest ways to cart the other half, kids, dog etc to the pub (remember those?). But it’s far more than that. The air-cooled 750cc twin is a genuine alternative to an adventure bike, that is, if you want to go on a proper adventure. Think about it. On tarmac, the disadvantage of sidecars is they don’t lean over and therefore aren’t as exciting as bikes, and you can’t filter. But on dirt, you don’t really lean over that much anyway (not on purpose), there’s no traffic, and it’s a distinct advantage not being able to topple over. Plus, with two-wheel drive engaged, Ural’s Geo is a doddle to slide. ‘It will go virtually anywhere,’ says Rob MacDonald, who runs Ural adventure…

2 min.
new chief’s new chief

‘A bike that evokes emotion with raw American muscle’ To celebrate 100 years of Chiefs, Indian have revealed three new ones, all designed by the man they pinched from BMW three years ago. The variants are all powered by Indian’s humongous air-cooled 1901CC V-twin and come with an array of electronics. ‘We wanted to capture a timeless look that never goes out of style, and looks beautiful whether naked or fully dressed,’ says Ola Stenegard, Indian’s design director, whose previous work includes BMW’s S1000RR and R nineT. ‘We also wanted to keep it simple enough to allow riders’ imaginations to take flight with personalisation options and possibilities. Ultimately, this is a bike that evokes emotion with simple mechanical styling and raw American muscle.’ Despite the back-to-basic looks and stripped back style, the bikes…

3 min.
there’s radar but

Rather than take on the GS head-to-head, KTM’s new Super Adventure S befuddles the Beemer by being more tempting to disenchanted sportsbike riders. The new KTM’s styling is more aggressive, the handling sharper and it gets a new toy as standard – radar cruise control. The GS probably won’t get that until 2022. At £14,999 the KTM is competitively priced too – a radar-spec’d Ducati Multistrada with semiactive suspension like the KTM’s is over £20k. You’d think the headline change would be the radar-controlled cruise control, which will lock on to a vehicle in front and automatically maintain a constant distance (it uses the same Bosch electronics as BMW’s new R1250RT and the Multistrada). But all KTM’s marketing guff concentrates on changes to the styling and the performance benefits of the new…