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 / Coches y Motos
Classic Bike

Classic Bike September 2019

Classic Bike helps and inspires enthusiasts to get more from their passion for classic motorcycles. The magazine shares their fascination with motorcycling’s heroic past while also helping them buy, fix and improve the bikes in their shed. Our main areas of content are: - Inspirational and entertaining reads that celebrate the glory of motorcycling, from riding stories that put the reader in the seat of history’s greatest bikes to incredible racing tales - Restoration stories and instructional features that inspire and help people get their tools out and sort out their old bike - In-depth technical features from the most expert and authoritative writers in motorcycling If you share our passion about classic motorcycles from the last century, you'll enjoy reading Classic Bike.

País:
United Kingdom
Idioma:
English
Editor:
H BAUER PUBLISHING LIMITED
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12 Números

EN ESTE NÚMERO

2 min.
disciplined in many ways

IN AN ERA where every facet of motorcycling has been splintered into tiny niches within an overall niche, it helps to jog the memory that there was a time when competitors (or fans for that matter) didn’t stick to one discipline. We tend to forget that prior to the 1970s you often weren’t just a trials rider or road racer or scrambler, you were a motorcycle competitor. Nothing brings this alive more than John Westlake’s interview with Sammy Miller (see p68) talking of those days when competitors would ride a different bike each weekend – or even the same bike in different disciplines if you were a busy clubman. In fact, some clubmen might even ride the bike to and from the meetings. Sammy, of course, was a cut above the regular clubmen…

1 min.
classic bike

CLASSIC BIKE IS MADE BY... Editor Gary Pinchin, gary.pinchin@bauermedia.co.uk Art editor Austin Smith, austin.smith@bauermedia.co.uk Production editor Mark Holmes, mark.holmes@bauermedia.co.uk Technical editor Rick Parkington, classicbike.workshop@bauermedia.co.uk Editorial assistant Colleen Moore, colleen.moore@bauermedia.co.uk, 01733 468099 Head of Publishing Steve Herbert, steve.herbert@bauermedia.co.uk ADVERTISING Group Commercial Director Gareth Ashman 01733 468118 Commercial Manager Sarah Dodd 01733 366311 Account Manager Samantha Creedon-Gray 01733 366365 Senior Telesales Francesca Chiarizia 01733 366360 Telesales Exec Ruby Jones 01733 366406 LES GRANDS FROMAGES Editorial Director June Smith-Sheppard Managing Director Motorcycling Rob Aherne MD Automotive Group Niall Clarkson CEO of Bauer Publishing UK Rob Munro-Hall Chief Financial Officer Bauer Magazine Media Lisa Hayden…

5 min.
mad megola racer found

‘THE WHEEL-MOUNTED ENGINE WOULD ‘PULL’ THE MOTORCYCLE THROUGH CORNERS’ IT WAS THE sound that first heralded one of the most bizarre days in motorcycle racing. A deep drone vibrated through the air, giving the impression of a low-flying World War I bomber on the prowl. As it grew louder, all eyes focused on the main straight of Germany’s AVUS race circuit. The two-wheeler responsible for the noise slowed to enter the hairpin, and as the rider used engine braking to slow the bicycle-like motorcycle, it took on that edgy note that an old aircraft engine makes at taxiing speed. Then he accelerated away, with the engine returning to peak revs and that unique, soul-stirring sound that only a radial or rotary engine biplane and a 1920s Megola motorcycle makes. That day in the…

4 min.
goodbye to the hobbit

DRAGSTALGIA, the annual must-see nostalgia event for drag racing fans, produced a feast of entertainment, as Santa Pod resounded to the ninth running of this increasingly popular meeting. One thing you could always rely on as July rolled around was that John Hobbs would be headlining the bike entry list. The Hobbit, his supercharged twin-engined Weslake, first roared into life back in 1975, and quickly established new European drag racing records after only two events. Next year things will be different, though, as John had decided that 2019 would mark his last appearance on track riding the ever-popular bike. So what would we be served up as a suitable finale? It all looked so promising, as a first run of the year netted a standing quarter-mile at an excellent 8.43s/161mph, to lead…

1 min.
hall of fame inductees

Announced during the first day of Dragstalgia, this year’s inductees included the McCoy Dynamics team, of Mick Hand, ‘Ag’ MacPhail and Keith Parnell, in recognition for the innovation and performance they brought to the sport. Mick’s little CB72 Honda performed way above its size, and the unforgettable four-cylinder Jade Grenade combined lay-down monocoque construction, an exhaust-driven ground-effect system, and seven-second performance on methanol by 1985. Keith Parnell entered the record books when he became the first rider in Europe to run under nine seconds, on his blown 750 Triumph, in June 1975. Two of the team members continue to think outside the box, as Mick Hand, with input from Ag, currently campaigns a compound turbocharged Puma funny bike, ridden by Keith’s son Lorcan. Mick’s co-partner in the project, Barry Eastman,…

2 min.
les williams

LES WILLIAMS, who has died aged 87, dedicated his working life to Triumph. He gained fame as the owner of Slippery Sam, the renowned 750cc Trident racer that won five consecutive Production TTs from 1971 to 1975 and got its name from an oily episode at the 1970 Bol d’Or 24-hour race. By then Les had already spent 20 years behind the scenes at Triumph’s Meriden factory. He joined the Service Department in 1955 after spending three years in the regular Army where he was a fitter on the Royal Signals display team’s Triumphs. Les moved to Triumph’s Experimental Department in 1958, where he took the supervisory role of chargehand. He recalled fitting an electric starter to a 350cc 3TA, before the project was quashed by top boss Edward Turner because of…