Country Living UK September 2018

Whether you live in the town or countryside, in Country Living you’ll find a wealth of ideas for your home and garden, learn about traditional crafts, keep informed of rural issues, enjoy irresistible dishes using seasonal produce and, above all, escape the stress and strain of modern-day life.

País:
United Kingdom
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Hearst Magazines UK
Periodicidad:
Monthly
4,13 €(IVA inc.)
30,96 €(IVA inc.)
12 Números

en este número

1 min.
this is the time for…

…foraging in fields and hedgerows. The blackberries are fattening, wild apples ripening and mushrooms* free for the taking from our parks, woodlands and roadside verges. Many plants – often those we think of as weeds, such as nettles and dandelions – are good for eating but can also be harnessed medicinally to treat minor ailments (see The Good Life on page 25). In this month’s Kitchen Table Talent (page 28), we meet one reader who has turned her homemade herbal remedies into a thriving skincare business and another who uses her foraged finds, including alder cones and hawthorn berries plus ordinary kitchen-cupboard items such as coffee grounds and red onion, to create the most amazing array of fabric dye colours (page 72). The power of plants is a wonderful thing. FOLLOW…

f0009-01
2 min.
emporium

For stockists, see Where to Buy *DUE TO THE SIZE OF THE PATTERN REPEAT, CUSHION COVERS MAY NOT SHOW THE EXACT IMAGE ILLUSTRATED HERE. PRICES AND AVAILABILITY CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO PRESS. LIFESTYLE PHOTOGRAPHY AND STYLING BY SIMON BEVAN; EMMA LEE; HESTER PAGE; CAROLINE REEVES; PIA TRYDE…

f0011-01
1 min.
a month in the country

Say farewell to summer swallows CAST YOUR EYES TO THE SKIES THIS MONTH AND YOU MAY SPOT SWATHES OF SWALLOWS (Hirundo rustica) as they gather in preparation for their epic migration across the Sahara. A fleeting and beautiful harbinger of warmer months, these seasonal visitors are an iconic sight with their bow-shaped wings, deep forked tails and blue, white and crimson plumage. Earlier in the season they’re most commonly seen diligently attending a nest of young or diving after insects in the dusk, but now, as autumn approaches, larger and larger numbers will be seen coming together before they suddenly vanish south. Enjoy the final glimpses of this avian favourite and wish them well on their journey. To find out more, visit wildlifetrusts.org.uk.…

f0017-02
1 min.
take part in organic september

Decline in wildlife populations and an increase in diet-related health problems are just two of the reasons why we need to pay more attention to how our food is produced. Organic fare contains fewer pesticides, no artificial additives and ensures high-quality animal welfare, so this month, the Soil Association is encouraging all of us to give it a go. The more people who buy organic, the more organic farms there will be – so even switching a few everyday items could make a big difference. Try seeking out your local independent retailer or signing up for an organic box scheme, but first download a free starter kit at soilassociation.org.…

f0017-01
1 min.
a walk to take

At this time of year, wonderful rust-coloured woodland awaits you on this five-and-a-half mile Wiltshire walk, culminating at King Alfred’s Tower – a 160ft folly believed to mark the site where King Alfred the Great rallied his troops in 878. Beginning at the visitor reception of Stourhead – the world-famous landscape garden presided over by the National Trust – take the zig-zag path down to the Spread Eagle Inn before passing a courtyard, church, lake and waterwheel. After that, you’ll traverse mixed woodland and a steep, one-mile ascent before coming out onto the 18th-century Terrace Ride. Stroll another half-mile and you’ll reach the tower – then you can loop back past an Iron Age Hill Fort and straight to the Spread Eagle for a well-deserved local brew.…

f0018-01
1 min.
tassel streamer

1 Choose the colours of tissue paper you wish to use. Use a single shade, or two to three different ones for a jolly multi-coloured design.2 Cut 33.5cm wide x 50cm tall pieces from each of the tissue papers. Cut as many as you need for the garland. Each piece will make one tassel.3 With the short sides at the top and bottom, fold each piece in half (half the height).4 With the fold at the top, cut the paper vertically at 1cm intervals, stopping 2cm-3cm from the fold each time.5 Carefully open out and turn the tissue so the fringes are on the left and right, with the solid band running A simple make… TASSEL STREAMER down the centre. Make sure the strips of tissue are flat.6 With your…

f0018-02