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Guns & Ammo

Guns & Ammo November 2019

Guns & Ammo spotlights the latest models, from combat pistols to magnum rifles...reviews shooting tactics, from stance to sighting...and explores issues from government policies to sportsmen's rights. It's the one magazine that brings you all aspects of the world of guns.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
KSE Sportsman Media, Inc.
Periodicidad:
Monthly
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12 Números

en este número

7 min.
reader blowback

CITORI FACTS I read with interest Bob Hunnicutt’s review of the new Browning Citori in the August issue. The Citori is indeed a remarkable shotgun that hasn’t changed significantly since its introduction almost a half century ago. The article gave a good description of the particular gun that was being evaluated, not much left out. However, there were some inaccuracies in the discussion of the Citori and Browning’s Miroku connection. The first Citori did not appear in 1978, as stated in the opening paragraph; It was in ’73. This was sometimes referred to as the pre-Type 1, while others call it the Type 1. The second version was introduced in 1976, and it was a redesign of the first Citori. Since then, there have been changes culminating in the latest 725…

3 min.
meet “bruno”

MOST AMERICANS are unfamiliar with Brno firearms, which have been made in what is now the Czech Republic since 1918. Before 1918, the Brno plant was an arsenal in city of Brno within the Austro-Hungarian Empire. In keeping with the Treaty of Versailles, the arsenal was dissolved in 1918 at the close of World War I, however, the plant was converted to an arms factory known as Ceskoslovenská zbrojovka to manufacture Mannlicher and Mauser rifles in the newly-formed Czechoslovakia. With the Treaty of Versailles, Germany and brands such as Mauser were prohibited from making military arms. In 1920, Brno purchased tooling and surplus firearms from Mauser-Oberndorf and began building and rebuilding Mauser 98 rifles. Soon after, Brno also acquired tooling and know-how to produce Mannlicher rifles from Steyr Arms in Austria and…

1 min.
the auction block

A superb pair of Ernest Dumoulin left-hand double rifles in .375 H&H Magnum and .470 Nitro Express with consecutive serial numbers, brought an impressive $70,000 at a May 12, 2019 Sportsman’s Legacy sale. The guns’ top levers open to the left and cheekpieces are on the right side of the butts. Common features include hooded-ramp front sights with flip-up night beads, windage-adjustable quarter-rib express rear sights with one fixed-and three-folding leaves (engraved 50/100/150/200), manual safeties, articulated front triggers, bushed strikers, hand-detachable sidelocks, jeweled water tables, extended-upper and -lower tangs, trapdoor grip caps, beavertail fore-ends, and 26 lines-per-inch checkering. Barrels are rust blue and actions are finished in an accented coin. Triggers, fore-end releases and some pins are niter blue. Both feature full coverage game-scene engraving surrounded by bouquet and scrollwork…

9 min.
identification & values

“I’ve always had a soft spot for Whitney Wolverines . With their sleek look and aluminum frames, they were quite futuristic for their day.” U.S.1836 PISTOL CONVERSION Q: Could you please help me on this newly acquired pistol? The rotating ramrod functions correctly, although it isn’t perfectly straight. The hammer works in all three-positions and all internal springs seem to operate perfectly. The trigger also seems to work just as it should. Allin-all, the firearm seems to function perfectly (I have not fired it) and is in amazing shape (I think) for its age. Could you give me any information and the value on this firearm? J.G Email A: You have a percussion conversion of the U.S. Model 1836 Pistol. Originally a flintlock, your photos indicate this particular specimen was manufactured by A.H. Waters…

1 min.
recommended read

Conquest of Empire Defense of the Realm: The British Soldier’s Rifle from 1800 to 2014 by John Hutchins, 1st edition, May 30, 2014. Publisher: Tommy Atkins Media Limited. A hardcover copy can be purchased on Amazon.com for 60 euros, plus 10 euros postage. Chock full of excellently detailed color photography and authoritative text, this book more than fulfills the promise of its title. It is a superb chronicle of the development of the British rifle from the flintlock Baker to the self-loading SA 80. Recounting not only history and pertinent details about the arms, the author interweaves social history and hands-on information about operation, shooting and effectiveness of a large cross section of British rifles — muzzle-loading, breech-loading, percussion, cartridge, bolt-action, automatic (well, you get my drift) — just about every…

3 min.
high-tech hearing protection

IN THE NOT-TOO-DISTANT PAST, shooters had two choices when it came to hearing protection. In-ear plugs worked well -— sometimes so well you couldn’t hear conversations or more importantly, range commands. Then there were muffs worn over the ear. The drawback to muffs were that they could make it difficult to obtain a proper cheek weld and sight picture with a rifle or shotgun. Nevertheless, shooters have flocked to electronic muffs. Not only do they muffle the sound of gunfire, they amplify voices, making them ideal for communicating on the range. Walker’s new Silencer Bluetooth Rechargable Earbuds combine the best of both worlds, affording you the convenience of plugs with the sound modulating capabilities of electronic muffs. As if that wasn’t reason enough to own a set, they are Bluetooth enabled so…