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Huck

Huck

Issue 73: Autumn 2020

Huck is inspired by DIY culture, featuring people who make you think, who challenge the system, who strike out on their own. Packed with intelligent journalism and stunning photography, it covers the people and the places that are shaping culture all over the world.

País:
United Kingdom
Idioma:
English
Editor:
The Church of London
Periodicidad:
Bimonthly
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6 Números

en este número

2 min.
an introduction

So. Where to start? Let’s try the beginning. Back in February (which, by now, feels like more than a few lifetimes ago), we started work on the latest instalment of Huck. The one you’re reading now The working title of the issue was Sanctuary. Over the course of its 100 pages, we collected stories of refuge and resilience: people who’d found solace in a scene, movement or culture; communities who’d come together as one to protect and empower each other. While we’re always proud of the magazines we put out, this one felt special; packed full of hope and possibility. Then everything fell off a cliff. In March, as countries across the globe began to shut down, we made the decision to hit pause on the issue. A whole host of reasons – all…

1 min.
death magick abundance

When it comes to long-term documentary work that focuses on a specific community, there are obvious ethical questions to consider. So when Akasha Rabut began piecing together Death Magick Abundance – a portrait of New Orleans, post-Katrina – she made sure to confront them. “If you’re going to make work like this you have to accept that it’s not always going to impact the community positively. So the question became, ‘What can I do so that it does?’” Over the course of the ten-year project, Rabut taught locals how to take photos, then made sure to hire those former students as much as possible. Through a grassroots project, she also launched a non-profit called Creative Council, where students were awarded money to apply for college by completing a course. In this…

1 min.
dear philadelphia

Despite the fact she’s from the UK, Renee Maria Osubu doesn’t feel like an outsider in Philadelphia. The London photographer first visited the city in 2015 when volunteering at a summer camp with her church, before returning again a year later to run a photography workshop with over 100 local children. It was then that she began documenting the place that has since become a second home. The subsequent long-term project sees her using her distance to an advantage, honing in on moments that might otherwise go unnoticed by the vast majority. It’s these quiet, fleeting scenes that Osubu values the most: for her, they present an opportunity to depict a community in a different light, revealing the beauty in its everyday. “To me, Philadelphia means hope,” she says. “Like anywhere else,…

1 min.
compton cowboys

Walter Thompson-Hernandez was six years old when he first came across the Compton Cowboys. Having grown up nearby, he was driving into the city with his mother when two black men rode past on horseback. It was unlike anything he’d ever seen before. Those riders were members of the ‘Compton Junior Posse’, a youth equestrian group that eventually became the Cowboys in 2017. As an outfit, their aim is to preserve the legacy of black riders in America, while their motto – “Streets raised us, horses saved us” – speaks to the impact that the practice has had on their lives. “They are important because they are trying to reinsert themselves back into the history books after being the victims of historical erasure,” says Thompson-Hernandez. “They are also advocating – and riding…

6 min.
mavi

Few artists will take you to the depths of their mind with more clarity than Mavi. The 20-year-old rapper is, by his own admission, naturally inquisitive. So as far as he’s concerned, nothing is off limits. His swirling stream-ofconsciousness flow channels the likes of Ralph Ellison, Virginia Woolf and Earl Sweatshirt, with probing lyrics designed to teach young black people how to insulate themselves with self-love – so that the systemic hate they experience in America doesn’t feel insurmountable. “I fucking love asking questions,” he says, speaking over the phone while wandering through LA in pursuit of chicken curry. “I am an interrogator. I don’t think you can be a black man in this society and not be inquisitive, because this shit really doesn’t make much sense. I want to look for…

14 min.
queens of caracas

“Shortly before this issue went to press, I received news that Aron – the inspiration for this story – had died. We decided to keep his contribution to the larger piece, as well as the updates he provided just before his death, because Aron dedicated his life to drag. He exemplified the culture. He was a true force who became a legend for his community – his dedication to his fellow queens went unparalleled. It was an honor to know him and it means a great deal to be able to share his world with you all. Rest in power, Queen Arona.”– Lexi It’s 11pm at Club Cul*, a covert drag club hidden within a disused corporate building situated on the affluent east side of Caracas, Venezuela. Located in the neighbourhood…