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National Geographic Traveler

National Geographic Traveler February-March 2014

National Geographic Traveler is the world's most widely read travel magazine. With captivating storytelling and beautiful you-are-there photography, National Geographic Traveler brings you the world’s best destinations. Experience the same high-quality articles and breathtaking photography contained in the print edition.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
National Geographic Society
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en este número

2 min.
looking at the world differently

IT WAS MARCH 2012, and I was sitting at a café in Milan’s Piazza del Duomo, an immense square that spreads like an apron from the foot of the city’s cathedral, a Gothic marvel. The piazza was swarming with fans of the city’s beloved soccer club, which at that moment was playing against perennial rival Barcelona. Fans streamed from bar to bar, braying for their teams and lustily singing fight songs. At another time I would have scavenged a ticket and joined the pandemonium. However, I was in Milan for the launch of Traveler’s new Italian edition, Touring. When I leaf through a copy of Touring now, I think of my Italian meal with editorial director Silvestro Serra and some of his staff—and that Milan moment on the piazza. Similarly, our…

3 min.
contributors

MICHAEL YAMASHITA PHOTOGRAPHER, “OVER THE HORIZON” HOME: Rural New Jersey. ON THE FRINGE: I may have the world’s largest body of work on China from 30 years of photo shoots. I’m especially drawn to the border provinces, which have the most cultural and ethnic diversity. You can go from 20,000-foot snow mountains to rain forests in a day’s drive. SECRET OF CHINA: I recently shot the Silk Road, along the Hexi Corridor. The biggest surprise was the Danxia Landforms. These “rainbow” mountains with colored striations were still undiscovered when I last passed through, in 2003. Since becoming a World Heritage site in 2010, the place has become a hot destination for Chinese photographers, yet it’s virtually unknown in the West. TOMORROWLAND: My fantasy is to photograph Afghanistan when war is over. Traveling north from Iran…

2 min.
design within reach

TALK TO US E-mail: travel_ talk@ngs.org Twitter: @NatGeoTravel Instagram: @NatGeoTravel Facebook: National Geographic Travel Letters: Travel Talk Editor,National Geographic Traveler, 1145 17th St. N.W. Washington, DC 20036 Include address and daytime telephone number. Letters we publish may be excerpted or edited. Subscriber Services:ngtservice.com 1-800-NGS-LINE (647-5463) FROM CHOCOLATE to architecture, design takes center stage in Copenhagen—and likewise appeared in a starring role in Bruce Schoenfeld’s November 2013 feature (“Danish Modern”). “I found it particularly interesting that Danes tend to wait for a design challenge to present itself, and then they figure out an elegant solution,” wrote Erik Illi of Kalispell, Mont. “I also like their notion of environmental friendliness, miljøvenlig—that it’s most sustainable to make something useful. This is quite a contrast to many American industries that introduce a continuous stream of new products while seeming to ignore previous…

1 min.
on china’s forgotten road

On page 46, Scott Wallace searches for traces of his wayward grandfather in China’s Yunnan Province. National Geographic Adventures follows the ancient trade route that crisscrosses these borderlands in “China: The Tea Horse Road and Shangri-La.” On this active journey, travelers track endangered golden monkeys, glimpse rituals at the 17th-century Dongzhulin Monastery, and hike through mushroom meadows. Photographer Michael Yamashita will guide a special trip for shutterbugs April 7–17. NATIONALGEOGRAPHICADVENTURES.COM/CHINA SAVE THE DATE A MEETING OF LIKE MINDS AND FULL PASSPORTS The November 2013 issue featured “Travelers of the Year,” our second annual showcase of ordinary people on extraordinary missions, including a caregiver bringing medicine to the Himalaya, two friends (right) microfinancing bikes in rural Uganda, and a blogger helping girls get passports. On February 6, five of those travelers will convene at National…

1 min.
peak experiences

WHEN TIM MEDVETZ SHATTERED HIS BODY AND CRACKED HIS SKULL IN A NEAR-FATAL MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENT IN 2001 , HE WAS NOT EXPECTED TO WALK AGAIN . A YEAR LATER, HE WAS CLIMBING MT. EVEREST. NOW, ON “GOING WILD,” TIM IS TAKING EVERYDAY AMERICANS ON A RIGOROUS JOURNEY, TRANSPORTING THEM TO PLACES OTHERS CAN ONLY DREAM OF REACHING WHERE THEY CAN EXPLORE THE WONDERS OF THE WORLD—AND REDISCOVER THEMSELVES. IN THIS EPISODE, WE MEET KRIS HARTMAN, WHO’S BEEN DEALING WITH THE DEATH OF HIS SISTER SEVEN YEARS AGO BY IMMERSING HIMSELF IN HIS JOB AND NIGHTLY TV-WATCHING BINGES. HIS WIFE WORRIES THAT’S HE’S MISSING OUT ON HIS SON’S CHILDHOOD. “HE NEEDS A WAKE-UP CALL —a little dose of Mother Nature,” says Tim. Together, they’ll take a treacherous three-day journey up the summit of Mt.…

1 min.
the new wine wizards of oz

BAROSSA VALLEY, AUSTRALIA | Like a fine wine, this valley an hour north of Adelaide is aged perfection. Wineries here are housed in sandstone cottages built circa 1860, and multigenerational families still use Old World techniques and fruit from century-old vines planted in the shadow of ancient gum trees. Visitors follow rows of gnarled grapevines to find more than 150 wineries and 80 tasting rooms—called cellar doors—from some of the country’s most vaunted Shiraz names. But lately, the younger generation has set a new course that’s equal parts heritage and renewal. “We’re about more than traditional Shiraz,” says Kirsty Radford, part of a family of fifth-generation winemakers. “We’re trying different fermentation and growing methods and producing varietals not usually done here.” Tap into the revitalization at the Artisans of Barossa,…