Northshore Magazine (Digital)

Northshore Magazine (Digital) June/July 2020

For 20 years, Northshore magazine’s experienced editors, creatives, writers, and photographers have captured the region with its award-winning prose and design. The magazine offers sophisticated service journalism coupled with stunning photography. We report on desirable towns and neighborhoods, places to hike and bike along the coast, which doctors are first-rate, and which restaurants, shops, spas, salons, and services are the Best of the North Shore.

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País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
RMS Media Group, Inc.
Periodicidad:
Monthly
5,25 €(IVA inc.)
8,76 €(IVA inc.)
10 Números

en este número

2 min.
brighter days

As we move through June into the height of summer, we are fortunate to live in a region with so many fun outdoor activities. Although COVID-19 restricts some of our summer travel plans, the North Shore is rife with places to frolic and play while keeping social distancing protocols in place. Bike trails, hiking paths, and, of course, endless Atlantic Coast beaches are all within our reach. In this issue we celebrate all things summer on the North Shore. From exploring some of our favorite parks and open spaces to backyard birding, sailing charters, and tuna fishing along our coastline, we hope to offer you great ideas to while away the days. We also visit a few of our favorite clam shacks around the North Shore. Summer just would not be complete…

2 min.
correspondence letters to the editor

Hello Nancy, Your message of hope in May’s Editor’s Note is the essence of what we have to hold onto, it’s everything. Personally, in recent times, hope’s meaning resonated in the words of Barack Obama’s inspirational tome The Audacity of Hope. Your timely reminder and the writings of others need to continue, a forever message. We appreciate you including Savour Wine & Cheese and spotlighting Gloucester in May’s “itinerary” along with other merchants and organizations boosting Cape Ann’s ascending importance as a singular destination north of Boston. Thank you, Peter F. Minasian, Principal and Creative Director, Minasian Marketing Communications Dear Northshore, We appreciate that you posted Cinco de Mayo “Sailing Heals Meals” story on your digital issue last week! It was a really nice piece with lots of good things happening to help others on the…

2 min.
contributors

LAUREN TORLONE MAHONEY / PAGE 82 / Lauren Torlone Mahoney is a media consultant, adjunct journalism professor, and writer. She spent a decade working for national broadcast news networks CNN, Fox News, and C-SPAN. She is also a member of the Society of Professional Journalists. JEANNE O’BRIEN COFFEY / PAGES 16 / Jeanne O’Brien Coffey has been freelancing for more than 10 years, covering everything from hot New York restaurants for the Zagat guide to top luxury travel spots for ForbesLife. She is Northshore magazine’s food editor and travels the region test-tasting chefs’ newest dishes. DOUG LEVY / PAGES 56, 112 / Doug Levy is a former Minor League Baseball umpire who turned to a career in photography. Levy’s photography work has taken him on helicopters over Boston, and inside some of the city’s largest…

7 min.
clammed up

If there is one thing the North Shore owns, it’s fried clams. Let others nitpick who made them first—did they appear in a recipe book in the 1800s? Were they on the menu at Boston’s Omni Parker House Hotel? Doesn’t matter to us. What matters is that Lawrence “Chubby” Woodman came up with a recipe in 1916 that has remained the gold standard at Woodman’s of Essex for more than 100 years. And even in these difficult times, people will drive for hours, across multiple state lines, to get to our “Clam Highway”—otherwise known as Route 133—lined with flats and fryolators from Ipswich to Essex. Customers have been making the trek since before there were traffic lights. “We’ve been through World War I, World War II, the Great Depression, the recession, the…

3 min.
small batch wines

Helen’s Bottle Shop made its debut last December in Manchester-by-the-Sea. Located in the center of town at 2 School Street, the soon to be not so hidden gem is owned and operated by Alexis Harwood, and sells wine, beer, and a selection of specialty items. Alexis was for several years the passionate beverage director for The Market Restaurant in Annisquam and Short and Main in Gloucester. Her shop is named after both her maternal and paternal grandmothers, who shared the same name, and with whom she was close. The former owned a wine shop and the latter, “appreciated beverages, and taught me how to drink scotch,” Alexis says with a smile. The building dates back to 1850, and was recently restored, leaving several original fixtures in place, including the large wooden door,…

5 min.
where history comes alive

Even those not from the North Shore, or Massachusetts for that matter, have probably heard the expression, “Dawn breaks on Marblehead.” That might be all they know about the peninsula accessible only through Salem, Swampscott, and the Atlantic Ocean. It refers to part of the eastern seaboard that is the first to receive the day’s light. But Marblehead is known for so much more than a longitude point on the globe, it brims with a long history and culture in the making of our country. With a population just under 20,000, Marblehead, located 17 miles north of Boston, attracts tourists from around the world throughout the summer—when we are not living through a pandemic, of course. Settled in 1629, the town played a pivotal role in the founding of the nation. A…