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category_outlined / Familia y Paternidad
Parents LatinaParents Latina

Parents Latina October/November 2018

Parents Latina helps you raise healthy, happy multicultural kids who are rooted in your family's heritage even as they shape America's future.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Meredith Corporation
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my self-care routine

RAISE YOUR HAND if you wouldn’t dream of leaving the house without a swipe of your favorite lipstick. Me too! Whether we’re dropping the kids off at school or getting ready for date night, we Latinas like to look polished. In fact, taking pride in our personal appearance is something that’s ingrained in us early on by the women in our families. My mother was my first beauty muse. She was a stay-at-home mom who was always cooking, cleaning, or taking care of someone, but she had lots of fun when it came to beauty, favoring red Christian Dior lipsticks, light floral fragrances by Armani and Cartier, and long “statement” fingernails that she had professionally done once a week. When she came over to my apartment for dinner on Sundays, she was…

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alexa penavega’s island life

Why did you move to Maui? Carlos and I are actors, but we didn’t fit in in L.A. Maui is so relaxed that it feels right. I grew up on a ranch in Florida and spent lots of time fishing. Something about the outdoors feels freeing, and we want the same for Ocean. You and Carlos star in the Hallmark channel’s Movies & Mysteries series. Do you enjoy working together? It’s hard when we have to be in different locations because of a project. One time we didn’t see each other for a month! We never want Ocean to be without either of us, so we made a rule: If Carlos is working on something, I won’t take anything on, and vice versa. That’s why we prefer to work on the same projects. What…

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our little monsters

1 EL CHUPACABRA This blood-sucking beast hypnotizes its prey—kind of like your sweet baby, who locks eyes with you when he latches on for dear life while breastfeeding. 2 EL CUCO He hides in the closet and scares unsuspecting children. Occasionally, this creature shows up at your bedside in the middle of the night. Oh wait, that’s your son. Same difference! 3 LA LLORONA She’s a weeping ghost who cries for her lost children by the river. But in your house, it’s what you secretly call your daughter when she turns into a puddle of tears in mere seconds.…

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close the pay gap

“Before asking for that salary bump, document and keep track of your contributions to demonstrate that you’ve gone above and beyond. Your managers can’t give credit for things they don’t know you do, so your self-assessment is very important.” Karina Franco Padilla, vice president of finance at Ingersoll Rand, an industrial manufacturing company “Use salary.com or glassdoor.com to find out how much other people with your skills make. Once you’re at the negotiating table, you can make a strong case for yourself and get a competitive compensation package.” Catherine Berman, cofounder & CEO of CNote, a financial-services firm “Even if your manager can’t fully implement a raise at the moment, you’ve opened the door to future conversations regarding your career goals. And you can always negotiate for other benefits, such as working remotely or…

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screen-time strategy

Separating a young child from a glowing screen is never easy, but giving him a two-minute warning could make it even harder, a study from the University of Washington in Seattle found. Two tactics that worked a bit better: making screen time part of a predictable routine and turning off the autoplay in video apps to create a natural stopping point. Now that’s making technology work for you. PRISCILLA GRAGG. WARDROBE STYLING BY LISA MOIR. PROP STYLING BY MICAH BISHOP. GROOMING BY TRICIA TURNER. STUDIO TEACHING BY TIM WEEG.…

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new autism-friendly app

The MagnusCards app’s quirky cartoon character, Magnus, teaches basic life skills, such as oral care, through engaging scenarios called “social stories.” It’s a proven method used to help people with special needs, including autism, grasp social cues and learn appropriate responses. Users choose a topic like “Food” and tap on a task such as “How to order in a restaurant.” You and your child then swipe through Magnus’s step-by-step tips. You can even build custom activities using your own photos and rules. Ages 6+, free for iOS and Google Play…

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