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PEOPLE The Beatles 1969PEOPLE The Beatles 1969

PEOPLE The Beatles 1969

PEOPLE The Beatles 1969

The end of one of the most compelling and transformative decades in American history was also the end of a musical era. 1969, with the recording of their final two albums, ‘Abbey Road’ and ‘Let It Be,’ marked the end of the Beatles. Celebrating the 50th anniversary of this final musical gesture and the changes it ushered in, the editors at People present this new special edition, ‘The Beatles: 1969.’ Explore this wild and creatively productive time in “Their Final Year in Pictures.” Take a close, track-by-track look at the inspirations and legacy of the final two albums. Revisit the beginning of each member’s solo career and their lives beyond the Beatles, including the weddings of Paul and Linda and John & Yoko, and the infamous Bed-In for Peace. Plus: an intimate portfolio of photos and memories recreates “Woodstock at 50!” Finally, track the intricacies of “The Last Days” and consider the expansive cultural change the Liverpool Lads helped inspire. Rich with full-color photographs, People’s ‘The Beatles: 1969’ captures a profound year for music and the transformative dissolution of one of the greatest rock-n-roll bands to ever exist.

País:
United States
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Meredith Corporation
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access_time1 min.
a year in the life

1969. Before the year was out, we proved you could put a man on the moon. You could gather half a million people together in the name of peace and music. But you could not, for love nor money, keep together four young men who were outgrowing the band that had changed the culture forever. The last year of the 1960s was as busy for the Beatles as it was tumultuous. Within 12 months they would record two albums: Abbey Road, celebrating the 50th anniversary of its U.S. release in October, and Let It Be, with an accompanying film that documented both the fighting and the genius present in the studio. Individually John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr and George Harrison pursued separate lives. Two of them married; one became…

access_time6 min.
their final year in pictures

‘THE MAIN DOWNFALL IS THAT WE WERE LESS BUSINESSMEN AND MORE HEADS…. WE GOT A MAN IN [KLEIN] WHO STARTED TO SAY, “COME ON, SIGN IT ALL OVER TO ME,” WHICH WAS THE FATAL MISTAKE’—McCARTNEY, TO ROLLING STONE IN 1974‘WE WENT THROUGH WEEKS OF ALL SAYING, “WHY DON’T WE CALL IT BILLY’S LEFT FOOT?” AND THINGS LIKE THAT. AND THEN PAUL JUST SAID, “WHY DON’T WE CALL IT ABBEY ROAD?” ’—RINGO STARR…

access_time5 min.
paul

“SORRY GIRLS, HE’S MARRIED.” When the Beatles played the Ed Sullivan Show back in 1964, producers helpfully put the name of each band member on the screen under a close-up of his face. And along with John Lennon’s name, they included that disappointing bit of news: He was off the market. Five years later Ringo had married, George had wed, John had divorced and would remarry. Now with Paul, the last bachelor Beatle (who also happened to be the one who set the most hearts throbbing), heading to the altar, the band’s press office knew what it had to do and alerted the mournful fandom. As a result, reported The Washington Post, “a wild scene” erupted outside Paul McCartney and Linda Eastman’s March 12, 1969, wedding at the Marylebone Registry…

access_time6 min.
john

“YOU COULD GO A BIT faster, Ringo!” “Okay, George!” That Beatles banter was caught on tape during an April 14, 1969, recording session. But George Harrison was on holiday, and Ringo Starr was at Twickenham Film Studios that day shooting The Magic Christian. The voices impersonating the two absent members belonged to John Lennon, at work that day with only his long-time songwriting partner Paul McCartney. That they were in good spirits while they were recording “The Ballad of John and Yoko,” Lennon’s rock and roll reportage on his recent wedding, was something of an achievement. A year earlier he and McCartney had almost come to blows over Yoko Ono’s presence in the studio during the making of The White Album. According to the record’s sound engineer Geoff Emerick, “Either she goes…

access_time6 min.
ringo

IN MARCH 1969, AS JOHN and Yoko were staging honeymoon bed-ins, Paul and Linda were celebrating their own newly minted union in the Greek Isles, and George Harrison and his wife, Pattie, were getting hauled into court one day on pot charges, Ringo Starr was out on a film location, tromping through a muddy field with comedy-hero-turned-costar-and-friend Peter Sellers. The two would share top billing in The Magic Christian, a black comedy in which Ringo plays a homeless waif adopted by the richest man in the world. The film would fizzle despite a glittering cast that included screen heavyweights Richard Attenborough, Laurence Harvey and Christopher Lee, Raquel Welch and Yul Brynner. But in the swinging London of 1969, a Beatle’s star power outshone all the rest. And reporters purportedly there…

access_time6 min.
george

GEORGE HARRISON ARRIVED at London’s Twickenham Film Studios, where the Beatles were gathering on Jan. 2, 1969, to begin filming themselves recording a new album. He had a batch of new songs written during an extended vacation in the States, and he was eager for his bandmates to hear them. After years of experimentation with the sitar, Harrison had rediscovered his love for guitar-based American music. “I had just been hanging out with Bob Dylan and the Band, having a great time,” recalled Harrison in 1995. During the sojourn, his wife, Pattie Boyd, joined him for Thanks-giving with Dylan and his family. Harrison stayed on and cowrote with Dylan and communed with Levon Helm and the Band. All the Beatles seemed ready for a return to their roots and tentatively titled…

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