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Pip Magazine

Pip Magazine

Issue 20

Pip Magazine provides simple, positive, practical solutions to living a more sustainable life. With articles on growing your own food, natural building,wholefoods, keeping bees, backyard chooks, fermenting, design, natural parenting and much more. Pip has profiles on people, projects, gardens, farms, houses and businesses. There are ‘how to’ guides, recipes, reviews, a directory and a kid’s section.

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País:
Australia
Idioma:
English
Editor:
Pip Magazine
Periodicidad:
Quarterly
5,69 €(IVA inc.)
21,07 €(IVA inc.)
4 Números

en este número

1 min.
fun pages

Q WHAT DID THE PEANUT SAY TO THE ELEPHANT? A NOTHING. PEANUTS CAN’T TALK, SILLY! NUTTY FACTS Six things you probably don’t know about nuts 1 The oldest known is a walnut which was first documented 12,000 years ago. 2 Chestnuts are the only nuts that contain vitamin C. 3 Peanuts don’t grow on trees, but underground. They’re actually a legume. 4 Despite its name, a coconut is not actually a nut – it’s a fruit. 5 Chocolate manufacturers purchase 40 percent of the world’s almonds. 6 Macadamia have the hardest shells of all nuts – don’t try and use your teeth! Q WHAT DID THE NUT CHASING ANOTHER NUT SAY? A I’M GONNA CASHEW FIND-A-WORD How many of the 24 words from this issue can you find hidden in this box? ALMOND BATTERY BEETROOT BICYCLE COMMUNITY ELECTRIC FIRE GUINEA FOWL KANGAROO GRASS KUMQUAT LIME MACADAMIA MICROCLIMATE OBSERVATION ORANGE PATCH PECAN RAIN SCOOTER SHEEP SORREL TWENTY WALNUT WINDBREAK WOODSTOVE COLOUR IN OUR COVER IMAGE Have a go at colouring…

1 min.
tropical

What to sow MAY Abika, basil (Thai, sweet and lemon), beans (snow and green), bok choy, Brazilian spinach, cassava, Ceylon spinach, chilli, choy sum, coriander, corn, cucumber, eggplant, galangal, garlic chives, ginger, honeydew melon, kale, mint, mustard greens, okra, oregano, pak choy, parsley, pumpkin, snake bean, sweet potato, radish, rocket, squash, taro, tomato, turmeric, watermelon, yam beans and zucchini. May is also a good time for nasturtiums, sunflowers and zinnias. JUNE Baby spinach, basil, bok choy, cassava, chilli, choy sum, coriander, cucumber, eggplant, galangal, garlic chives, ginger, green bean, honeydew melon, kale, mint, mustard greens, oregano, pak choy, parsley, pumpkin, radish, rocket, snake bean, snow peas, squash, sweet potato, taro, tomato, turmeric, watermelon, yam bean (jicama) and zucchini. Also edible flowers like nasturtiums, zinnias and cornflowers. JULY Baby spinach, basil, bok choy, cassava, chilli, choy sum…

5 min.
slow cooking low and slow

There’s nothing better than coming home to the enticing aroma of dinner cooking. Not always about convenience, the key to slow cooking is a lower temperature over a longer period of time which both slows ourselves down and allows us to draw more nutrients from the food we eat. Cooking slow enables you to be a more ethical meat eater, by making use of the whole animal. Undervalued cuts such as shoulders, necks, shanks or brisket will improve in texture and flavour when subjected to the potent alchemy of gentle heat and time that reduces moisture-loss, tenderises and concentrates flavours. Every cuisine around the world has devised ways to turn sinewy, boney cuts into delicious tender braises. Think French beef bourguignon, Italian osso bucco, Kashmiri rogan josh or a Mexican pozole. If…

1 min.
subtropical

What to sow MAY Beetroot, beans, broad beans, capsicum, carrot, cucumber, eggplant, garlic, leek (seedlings), lettuce, okra, onion, pak choy and peas (climbing, sugar snap and snow), potato, radish, rosella, rocket, silverbeet, spring onion, strawberry, sweet potato, tomato and zucchini. JUNE Beetroot, beans, broad beans, capsicum, carrot, cucumber, eggplant, garlic, leek (seedlings), lettuce, okra, Asian greens, parsnip, potato, radish, rosella, rocket, silverbeet, spring onion, strawberry, sweet potato, tomato and zucchini. JULY Asian greens, beetroot, coriander, daikon, kale, kohlrabi, leek, salad greens like lettuce, mustard greens, onion, peas, radish, rocket, shallot and turnip. AUGUST Basil, beans, beetroot, bok choy, pak choy, cucumber, eggplant, kohlrabi, melons, okra, pumpkin, potato, spring onions and tomato. Don’t forget to interplant with some colourful flowers to attract the pollinators. What to do Plant winter tomatoes in a spot where they will get at least six hours…

1 min.
mediterranean

What to sow MAY Artichoke, asparagus crowns, beetroot, broad beans, broccoli, Brussels sprout, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, celeriac, celery, endive, kale, kohlrabi, leek, lettuce, onion, radish, rocket, silverbeet, spinach, swede, turnip and watercress. JUNE Artichoke, asparagus crowns, beetroot, broad beans, broccoli, Brussels sprout, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, celeriac, celery, endive, kale, kohlrabi, leek, lettuce, onion, radish, rhubarb, rocket, silverbeet, spinach, swede, turnip and watercress. JULY Potato, onion and garlic. AUGUST Asparagus and rhubarb can be divided and transplanted. Keep planting successive crops of all types of peas. Greenmanure crops should be dug in before they flower and set seed (unless you’ve decided to keep those broad beans for eating). What to do Order bare-rooted deciduous trees for planting in winter and get the soil ready to plant in June. If you live in a low-lying or frosty spot, protect vulnerable plants by…

1 min.
cool temperate

What to sow MAY Broad beans, beetroot, carrot, chives, fennel, garlic, kale, kohlrabi, lettuce, mizuna, mustard greens, onion, parsley, peas, radish, shallot (plant bulbs), silverbeet, spinach and turnip. JUNE Broad beans, garlic (divide and plant cloves), mustard greens, onion, peas and radish. JULY Beetroot, lettuce, mustard greens, onion, peas and radish. AUGUST Artichoke, asparagus crowns, beetroot, cabbage, capsicum (start them off undercover), chilli (undercover), eggplant, kohlrabi, leek, lettuce, parsnip, peas, potato, radish, rocket, spring onion, strawberry (runners), sunflower, thyme, tomato (will need frost protection until the risk has passed) and melons (undercover). What to do Companion-plant your brassica crops with white flowering plants to confuse the cabbage white moth. Net young seedlings with superfine mesh to inhibit moths from laying eggs on the underside of the foliage. Cut back on watering and remove mulch from around plants if the garden…