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category_outlined / Men's Lifestyle
Esquire's Big Black BookEsquire's Big Black Book

Esquire's Big Black Book

Fall 2019

It's filled with almost 200 pages of useful information on everything from the proper way to mix the perfect martini to having a custom suit made and more. It is truly the one resource no modern man should be without.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hearst
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IN THIS ISSUE

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esquire

Editor in Chief Michael Sebastian Creative Director NICK SULLIVAN Deputy Editor BEN BOSKOVICH Managing Editor JOHN KENNEY Culture and Lifestyle Director KEVIN SINTUMUANG Senior Editor DANIEL DUMAS Style Director JONATHAN EVANS Food and Drinks Editor JEFF GORDINIER Senior Staff Writer KATE STOREY Assistant Editors ADRIENNE WESTENFELD, BRADY LANGMANN Associate Style Editor CHRISTINE FLAMMIA Associate Lifestyle Editor SARAH RENSE Associate Editor, Social Media MADISON VAIN Art—Design Director DRAGOS LEMNEI Consulting Art Director HITOMI SATO Senior Designer MIKE KIM Photo Director KELLY SHERIN Design Assistant C.J. ROBINSON Snapchat Designer CAMERON SHERRILL Digital Imaging Specialist REBECCA IOVAN Fashion— Fashion Assistant ALFONSO FERNÁNDEZ NAVAS Assistant Market Editors BENJAMIN CHAIT, KELLY HARRIS Hearst Visual Group—Chief Visual Content Director, Hearst Magazines ALIX CAMPBELL Visual Director JUSTIN O’NEILL Deputy Visual Director SALLY BERMAN Senior Visual Researcher DEIRDRE READ Associate Producer SAMEET SHARMA Copy and Research—Research Editor ROBERT SCHEFFLER Senior Copy Editor ALISA COHEN…

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the luxe of it all

I have a confession: I blow-dry my hair. It started about five years ago, after I stumbled upon a salon called Contesta Rock Hair in Manhattan’s West Village. The shop’s proprietor, a Roman expat named Simone who gave me the best haircut of my life, asked whether I blow-dry. I scoffed. “Never,” I told him. Being a blow-dry guy felt like a lifestyle—like being a smoker or doing yoga. It was a commitment. Simone looked me dead in the eye and said with his Italian accent, “How are you supposed to win the war if you’re not using the right weapons?” In that moment, I became a blow-dry guy, and haven’t looked back. Over the summer, my blow-dryer broke and it took a couple days before Amazon delivered a new one. One…

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what we’re hung up on

DOUBLE DOWN If you’re going to invest in luxury, it’s tough to beat this reversible leather bomber—two Hermès jackets for the price of one. FALL COLOR Stand out from the crowd of black and navy topcoats with Canali’s sensuously textured double-breasted version in a celestial blue so rich you’ll swear it was painted by van Gogh. WORKING CLASS If you want to show that you mean business, ditch the beat-up messenger bag and put your work effects in a proper briefcase, like this beauty from Berluti. (A shoulder strap is included—if you must.) THE SHOE MUST GO ON The beautiful simplicity of these pebbled brown derbies from John Lobb is a big part of the reason they can go absolutely anywhere—and with absolutely anything. THE DAVY CROCKETT UPGRADE Swap that boring, narrow-furrowed puffer jacket…

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grin for the win

Like Andy Cohen’s career or the phrase “I’m not here to make friends,” the cosmetic-dentistry industry owes its success to reality television. Specifically to a show called Extreme Makeover, which followed the journeys of regular people who wanted to look better than regular. Plastic surgery was a must for participants—and often, so was a set of veneers. Veneers, the cornerstone of cosmetic dentistry, weren’t new in the early aughts. For decades, dental work for the sake of aesthetics was common in the entertainment business, where actors would have their teeth painfully crowned to make them whiter and bigger. Modern porcelain-veneer technology was introduced in 1982, and many of us think these early versions are what constitute veneers today. We’ve all heard the horror stories: natural teeth ground down and covered by…

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stretching the rules

Jersey was the original performance fabric. It had a natural stretch (without the help of elastic) that meant it could—up to a point—retain its shape no matter what you did in it. This gave it the unique ability to function like a second skin, making it ideal for sportsmen in the second half of the 19th century. By the early 1930s, tennis player René Lacoste was championing knitted piqué polo shirts bearing his name and distinctive croc logo. Easy to wear in a doubles match, Lacoste’s polo shirt was even easier to wear off the court and marked a significant waypoint on the long walk to the casualization of the male wardrobe. The demand for functionality boomed post–World War II, inspired by the GI’s no-nonsense uniform. Comfort became the overriding motivator…

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class of the titans

PATEK PHILIPPE While it’s standard to give watches catchy names, Patek Philippe mostly sticks to numeration. This manual-wind white-gold chronograph balances timeless elegance and functional precision—really, the best of both worlds. 5172G chronograph ($73,710) by Patek Philippe; 212-218-1240. RICHARD MILLE Richard Mille’s trippy Bonbon Collection features watches that are inspired by—yep—confectionery. An enamel dial made to look like candied fruit? Sure! Why not? But there’s also a great deal of technical mastery going on under the hood. RM 16-01 Citron ($132,500) by Richard Mille; richardmille.com. ROLEX How does Rolex stay fresh? By finding new ways to incorporate groundbreaking materials into its legendary canon. The 42mm white-gold Yacht-Master features a black Cerachrom one-piece bezel insert whose raised numerals are polished to stand out from the matte background. Yacht-Master ($27,800) by Rolex; rolex.com. ZENITH In 1969, Swiss watchmakers scrambled to develop the first…

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