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Australian & New Zealand HandgunAustralian & New Zealand Handgun

Australian & New Zealand Handgun Issue 6

Australian & New Zealand Handgun showcases legitimate handgun shooting activities for recreational club and competitive shooters, collectors, historians, and those in the law enforcement and security industries. The magazine features reviews on air pistols, rimfire and centrefire self-loading pistols and revolvers, ammunition and other shooting accessories, as well as interviews with successful Australian and international handgun competitors, and articles on ammunition reloading, custom firearms and handguns of historical interest.

Maa:
Australia
Kieli:
English
Julkaisija:
Sporting Shooters' Association of Australia
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TÄSSÄ NUMEROSSA

access_time1 min
editorial

Welcome to the 2008 edition of Australian & New Zealand Handgun. In this edition we offer a range of reviews and stories for handgunners of all levels and disciplines. First up, senior correspondent Jennifer Martens speaks with Jason Williams, a young SA SSAA SASS shooter (what a mouthful!) who has just become Single Action Shooting’s newest world champion. A handgun, shotgun and rifle shooter, this already six-times Australian champion is a prime example of what a determined and talented young shooter can achieve with the support of their family and the shooting community. From here, we delve into some technical information. Science buffs and those with an interest in ballistics will particularly enjoy the ammunition reloading data and Ian Thompson’s article on understanding recoil in pistols, while our revolver and self-loading pistol…

access_time5 min
jason williams - high stakes winner

Ah, the cowboy. It’s a character that just about every little boy wants to be. As a youngster, dressing up like a cowboy was child’s play for Jason Williams. These days, it’s a ‘game’ with high stakes. Jason is Single Action Shooting’s newest world champion. This past July, the 26-year-old firearms instructor competed in the Single Action Shooting Society’s (SASS) world championship event - End of Trail. Having been the ‘bridesmaid’ one too many times during his shooting career, Jason was more than ready to claim the title. “Winning the world championships was a big thing for me,” he said. “I had been trying for this for a long time.” After his last shot in the competition, he wasn’t sure if he had done enough. He realised he had won as the…

access_time7 min
alliant pistol powders

The full range of Alliant smokeless powders was previously the subject of a broad-based review by Brendan Atkinson in the November 2006 edition of Australian Shooter. At the request of Wesfire, Alliant’s Australian distributors, this review looks in more detail at the range of specialised pistol powders in the Alliant range, of which there are no less than nine. Eight powder samples were supplied by Wesfire for evaluation. These included Red Dot, Bullseye, Power Pistol, American Select, Blue Dot, Herco, Unique and 2400. Green Dot was not supplied at the time because while it can be used in pistols, it is essentially a target shotshell powder. This is the case with all powders of this type; most are equally well-suited as shotgun powders and are listed in the Alliant catalogue as…

access_time11 min
the .32 s&w long cartridge

While relatively uncommon on most Australian ranges, the little .32 Smith & Wesson Long is highly regarded as a target cartridge, especially by European shooters. Historical notes The .32 S&W Long cartridge was introduced in 1903 in the S&W First Model solid frame, hand ejector revolver. In its original loading, a 98-grain round-nose bullet was pushed by 13 grains of black powder at a velocity of 780fps. It is also known as the .32 Colt New Police when loaded with a flat-nose bullet. Colt, Harrington & Richardson, Iver Johnson and Smith & Wesson made revolvers in the chambering, as did several European pistol manufacturers. It was originally aimed at the police enforcement market, though today it is deemed to be the smallest revolver around suitable for police work. However, many off-duty police and…

access_time8 min
recoil in pistols

As pistol shooters of all persuasions will be aware, pistols recoil when fired. The sole exceptions to the above statement occur in fantasyland, such as television and the movies, where pistols can apparently be fired at mind-boggling rates, with remarkable accuracy over phenomenal ranges without so much as a tremor, let alone a full recoil. We will hereinafter ignore such things and stick to the real world, where recoil is as inevitable as the rising of the sun and increases in taxes. Furthermore, real-world shooters will be aware that some pistol/load combinations recoil more generously than others and that some pistols are more readily controllable in recoil than are certain others. This phenomenon of recoil is not, of course, unique to pistols, but occurs in any system, firearm or not, which…

access_time10 min
vihtavuori pistol powders

For keen shooters who reload their own ammunition in this country, we are currently blessed with a variety of powder brands to choose from. Apart from the ADI (now Thales Australia) product, reloaders have access to Winchester, Alliant and VihtaVuori. The last three are imported and have all suffered from time to time with interruption of supply, but at the time of writing, this all seems well. VihtaVuori powders have been manufactured in Finland since 1926. The original intention was to be able to keep a reliable supply of powder for the military, but as the production was kept at a maximum, it soon became obvious that all needs could be filled and there would be some left for export purposes. In 1930, the plant at VihtaVuori began production of shotgun…

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