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Condé Nast House & GardenCondé Nast House & Garden

Condé Nast House & Garden March 2019

Condé Nast House & Garden offers the best in contemporary design, decorating, renovating, architecture, gardens, travel and entertaining. We focus on beautiful interiors, the people inspiring the design scene and the know how to help you decorate and live stylishly.

Maa:
South Africa
Kieli:
English
Julkaisija:
Content Nation Media (Pty) Ltd
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OSTA IRTONUMERO
2,51 €(sis. verot)
TILAA
22,41 €(sis. verot)
12 Numerot

TÄSSÄ NUMEROSSA

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from the editor

The real estate vogue for big, open-plan living spaces is a fetish that we are entirely guilty of stoking here at H&G, but we’re hooked on small, sassy, beautifully designed apartments, too – because any space that provides a good experience is a good space. Let’s start with a whole new trend in teeny, tiny spaces. It’s called micro living, and we unpack its unique selling points for you in Small Wonder on page 39. This is not just super clever design, it’s a sort of innovation revolution, a really out-of-the-box way at looking at modular living in 24m , with only the best essentials. How funky? We couldn’t resist. Another space that packs a potent punch is Surreal Estate, page 84. Urban and charming, its mood is a sensory highball with…

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houseandgarden.co.za

NEXT BEST THINGS WITH NEW-SEASON RANGES DROPPING IN STORE FOR BOTH LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL BRANDS, STAY UP-TO-DATE ON DESIGN’S MOST COVETABLE ADDITIONS. DON’T MISS AN EDITION SUBSCRIBE TO HOUSE & GARDEN ON ZINIO FOR YOUR MONTHLY DIGITAL DESIGN AND DECOR FIX, AND SAVE UP TO R114 PER YEAR. ZA.ZINIO.COM online DAILY DESIGN DISPATCHES ON NEED-TO-KNOW PEOPLE, PRODUCTS AND PLACES NEW YEAR, NEW HUE THIS MONTH WE’RE BREAKING DOWN THE BEST NEW (AND MOST SURPRISING) PAINT COLOURS. GET LOST MYSTERIOUS AND COCOONING, DISCOVER HOMES THAT OFFER AN ESCAPE FROM THE URBAN ONSLAUGHT WITH CLEVER SPACES AND HIGH-COMFORT DECORATING. FOLLOW US Facebook HouseGardenSA Instagram houseandgardensa Pinterest housegardensa…

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shopping

Wicker Games Add a touch of texture with cane, reed and rattan Crisp Cuts Metallics take colour to chic new heights PHOTOGRAPHS: SUPPLIED; PRODUCTION: EDWAINSTEENKAMP AND JANI ADELEY OOSTHUIZEN…

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chocolate block

warm neutrals Brown serves as a luxurious backdrop to create a warm, sophisticated and high-impact interior. In the right tone, brown allows an alternative decorating approach to the minimalism that has long been the style du jour. brown study Elevate the dark palette with other natural materials, like wood, leather and metal. Incorporate décor in natural earth tones like soft wheat brown, bottle green, rusty red and dirty pink. These warm tones will be in style for the next several years, as midcentury design continues its influence on interiors. colour evolution From décor to fashion, makeup and merchandising, our collective taste is moving to darker tones. But don’t abandon your millenial pink items just yet, rather incorporate them with trendy browns for a sensual colour combination. pitch dark A brown so deep, it’s almost black. But unlike…

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making space

Pilani Bubu Creative lifestyle activist, singer, songwriter, TV presenter, decorator, strategist, creative coach “I find that my happy place is usually in spaces where my creativity finds its own expression; either through my own ideas or through the ideas of others – when the ideas I indulge in my mind meet my senses: in what I see, feel, touch, taste and even smell. The most heightened experiences of this connection happen when I’m in studio creating and collaborating with others; the gentle sounds and the words I have in my head, and when I am on stage sharing how these intricate concepts have come to life. I experience the same connection when I’m on location; in a beautiful interior for my TV show, unpacking the colours, textures, shapes and forms in the…

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cut above

Topiary – the art of clipping shrubs or trees into architectural shapes – is a form of gardening that will never go out of fashion. Nor is it a new fad. Gardeners have been doing it at least since Roman times, when the first written records appear in manuscripts by Pliny the Younger, who described box hedges cut into shapes and elaborate animal topiary at his Tuscan villa. It reached its heyday in seventeenth-century Europe and is seen in its most ornate form at Louis XIV’s Versailles, where mile upon mile of clipped hedges and elaborate box parterres make this one of the most high-maintenance gardens in the world. The two most common plants to be topiarised are yew (Taxus baccata) and box (Buxus sempervirens). People often do not think beyond…

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