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Entrepreneur MagazineEntrepreneur Magazine

Entrepreneur Magazine September 2018

Entrepreneur magazine is the trusted source for growing your business and offers surefire strategies for success. Whether you are just thinking of starting a business, have taken the first steps, or already own a business, Entrepreneur offers the best advice on running your own company

Maa:
United States
Kieli:
English
Julkaisija:
Entrepreneur Media Inc.
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OSTA IRTONUMERO
5,04 €(sis. verot)
TILAA
13,11 €(sis. verot)
12 Numerot

TÄSSÄ NUMEROSSA

access_time3 min
why we’re all better together

WANT TO KNOW why we put a 13-year-old entrepreneur on the cover of this magazine? There’s the simple reason, of course: We want to celebrate youthful achievement and inspire others. But there’s a deeper reason, aimed at anybody old enough to rent a car. If that’s you, go take another look at Zollipops founder Alina Morse on our cover. She looks like she’s having fun, right? So carefree! Her whole life ahead of her! But make no mistake; she and her peers are coming to replace you. They are smart—trust us, we’ve interviewed them, and they are frighteningly smart. They see problems with fresh eyes, unencumbered by the calcified logic that blinds those with more experience. They’ve watched you, and seen you fail and succeed, and absorbed the lessons. They’re savvy.…

access_time7 min
gladwell, undefined

Malcolm Gladwell may have one of the strongest brands in media, but he never applies the word to himself. “I contradict myself a lot,” says the best-selling author and New Yorker staff writer, whose books include The Tipping Point and Blink. “How can I represent something as well-defined as a brand if I’m constantly changing my mind?” Instead, he counsels creatives to think of themselves as ever-adaptable—open to opportunities wherever they come. That’s why, for example, he got into podcasting. It was on a lark, but now, three seasons later, his show Revisionist History is a consistent chart-topper. (Each episode is about “the overlooked and misunderstood,” and is produced by the podcast company Panoply.) Here, he talks about his approach to productivity, his own evolution, and why entrepreneurs need to…

access_time3 min
i’m the leader. judge me!

One day in March, I arrived at my Los Angeles office and prepared for an emotional bruising. My executive coach had interviewed 17 people close to me—my wife, my mom, my cofounders, my direct reports, and some other employees—and it was time to learn what they said. What do they think are my strengths and weaknesses? What are my blind spots? Where do I need improvement? I wasn’t sure I was ready to hear the answers. Recently, I reached what felt like a pivotal time in my career. Over the past 11 years, sweetgreen, the company I started with two friends, has grown to 86 locations and millions of customers around the country, with more than 3,500 team members. I’m CEO, which means everyone comes to me with the hard questions. As…

access_time6 min
making it work remotely

Robert Glazer didn’t set out to build a 100 percent remote workforce. But in 2007, while forming his company, Acceleration Partners, he realized two things: One, fierce competition in hubs like New York and San Francisco had driven the salaries of even less-desirable candidates through the roof; and two, there was untapped talent in Acceleration’s niche field of affiliate marketing across the country. So Glazer began figuring out how to run a company flexible enough to hire workers who could work remotely. Back then, this was a rarity. Telecommuting was a concession you might make to individual workers, not a corporate strategy. There were few established protocols for making it work as well as, if not better than, a centralized workplace. So Glazer had to figure them out as he went…

access_time2 min
how this car drives a ceo

Most entrepre-neurs are concerned first and foremost about making payroll. If they accomplish that, they start to think about making some money themselves. And if they accomplish that, maybe they think about splurging on something they’ve wanted for a long time—an extravagant watch, a second home, a fancy car. For Steven Sashen, CEO and cofounder of Colorado-based Xero Shoes, it was…a Subaru. “I’d see a car on the road about once a week,” he says. “Every time, I’d think, Wow, that is supercool. What is it?” And every time, it was a Subaru BRZ—known as a snug, affordable little speedster. For a long time, Sashen was in no position to buy a new car. He and his wife, Lena, had founded Xero Shoes in 2009, an evolving line of lightweight, minimalist shoes…

access_time2 min
inside rent the runway

RENT THE RUNWAY PROMISES to make every woman’s fashion dreams come true, and the company—which rents designer pieces to shoppers at a fraction of the retail cost—has built an $800 million brand delivering on it. That goes for its staff, too. RTR’s newly renovated Manhattan headquarters is made for work but built like a fashionista fairy tale: Garment racks overflow with today’s latest trends, and meticulously arranged books celebrate the work of fashion greats. That’s in addition to a private employee fitting room, a meditation room, a lactation room, and a photo studio. And of course, the brand’s core values are painted on the walls to remind employees that “everyone deserves a Cinderella experience.” SYDNEY SCHAUB/ General counsel “Working as a general counsel at a startup is a completely different experience than…

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