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Mopar Action

Mopar Action August 2019

Mopar Action is the best-selling Mopar enthusiasts’ magazine on the market today. Mopar Action covers the entire world of Chrysler, Plymouth and Dodge vehicles, including classics, muscle cars, race cars, new car road tests, performance tips, technical advice articles, personality profiles, coverage of major Mopar events, restoration advice and club news from around the world. If it’s Mopar—you’ll find it in Mopar Action.

Maa:
United States
Kieli:
English
Julkaisija:
Athlon Media Group
Jakeluväli:
Bimonthly
Lue lisää
OSTA IRTONUMERO
5,57 €(sis. verot)
TILAA
18,57 €(sis. verot)
6 Numerot

tässä numerossa

3 min
breaking new ground in the auto service industry.

MANY READERS have asked about that photo that runs at the end of Tech Topics—you know the one of the guy under the car changing oil “the right way.” Well, actually we’ve received only one request about that photo. So if you, Ron Banach, are reading this page, you’ll get the answer. Ron wanted to know if the guy in the photo is Richard Ehrenberg. Of course it is, he’s the only guy on staff with wrenches. OK, it’s not E-booger. Here’s the real deal. Back in the ’80s I shot a couple of magazine covers for Automobile International —a serious automotive service publication that was printed in several languages and distributed in several countries. Automobile International was a controlled circulation publication-- meaning subscribers didn’t pay for it, they got it for free.…

3 min
road kill(ing time)

DRIVING. We all love it, or we probably would be reading KNITTING ACTION , or KITING ACTION , or simply INACTION . But I digress. Sometimes that drive is just a quick jaunt down the road, sometimes it’s a day trip, and sometimes it’s a marathon. And it’s on those latter runs when it’s nice to have a buddy along. Years ago, I edited another famous Mopar rag, when it was still located in central Florida. My routine then was to hit the road from here in the mountains of east Tennessee to that joint for two weeks each and every month. Between the driving, then flying to other events, hitting 30-day deadlines, and trying to help my wife with our pre-teen family, well, I got a little sideways. I mean,…

6 min
i love the smell of sheetmetal in the morning.

I LOVE THE SMELL OF SHEETMETAL in the morning…it’s less painful than napalm unless you buy the wrong part, trust the wrong seller etc. So ya’ heard the old saying, “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure”? Well here’s a new one from me to you, “his trash may be your treasure, but if you don’t watch your ass, his “junk” may become your problem and make your hard-earned cash his.” So? What are your options? You can build a time machine and go back to the year your ride was made and buy NOS right from the dealership, but when you figure the cost of the time machine, gas, tolls and the price of parts—there really is no cost savings. First off, ya gotta remember this is 50-plus year old…

17 min
how can i tell if i have a lock-up a727?

HEART-BRAKING RichardWhat I am asking is simple: Can 1973-’75 Dart disc brakes be used on a ’66 New Yorker? Gary Mendelow Via e-mail Gary–In a word: No. Expanded: Not even close! The best junkyard stuff that will bolt on is a complete setup from a 1973, or late ‘72 C-body. The 1969 through early ’72 C stuff will also fit and is viable now that inexpensive one-piece rotors are available (rockauto.com p/n 12163021). Pre ’69 C-body stuff also works, but the Budd (4-piston) parts are pure unobtainium. The low-buck way out is a bracket kit from scarebird.com, see above photos for details. METRICKS Richard–I have been working on a 1982 Diplomat, 318. I noticed that the power steering pump has some metric hardware. Is the engine still inches? When did the metric conversion begin? Harold Stern Sacramento,…

1 min
how to get help:

Address all queries to this address: RICHARD EHRENBERG PO BOX 302 MARLBORO NY 12542 Email (new): moparactiontech@yahoo.com GROUND RULES: • If you want to submit your question via email, please use the online submission form at www.moparaction. com. If we ask for more info, send back all existing text, or else! • Snailmail must include a SASE or a cash bribe. • All letters, electronic or otherwise, must include a full name and a least your city and state. You can request that it be withheld, however, and, if we had any the night before, we might even honor your request. • “20 questions” letters instantly get shredded and the scraps forwarded to Mopar Muscle. So – ask one clear question please, we’re a sleazy magazine, not an encyclopedia publisher. We won’t tell you step-by-step how to…

3 min
got the shaft on a near-nos wiper motor for a ’72 ’cuda.

DECLUTCHED Mr. Ehrenberg–A friend of a friend has an original 440 SuperBird. It is, I guess, what you call a survivor. I was surprised to find a solid (no clutch) fan. I thought that performance Mopars always had them. Can you explain this? Jonathan Foster Ft. Worth, TX Jon–SuperBirds, being mainly bottom breathers (think: tiny grille), were not easy to cool at highway speeds (and up!) As a result, ’Birds with 440-4 (E86) and 440-6 (E87) built after Nov. 5, 1969, with Torque-Flite, had solid fans (not fluid drive / Silent Flite). This info is from a bulletin dated Nov. 25, 1969. PEDALING CARPET Rick–Just one question—do you know what they did from factory regarding the accelerator ass’y (1970 B-Body)? Did they place the pedal ass’y over the floor carpet or did they mount the…