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Foreign PolicyForeign Policy

Foreign Policy

Spring 2019

FOREIGN POLICY is the premier, award-winning magazine of global politics, economics, and ideas. Our mission is to explain how the world works -- in particular, how the process of global integration is reshaping nations, institutions, cultures, and, more fundamentally, our daily lives.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Foreign Policy
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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contributors

Michael Anton served from February 2017 to April 2018 as U.S. President Donald Trump’s deputy national security advisor for strategic communications. He worked previously in the George W. Bush administration and for former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani. He is the pseudonymous author of The Suit: A Machiavellian Approach to Men’s Style.Elisabeth Braw directs the Royal United Services Institute’s modern deterrence program, which focuses on defense against emerging forms of warfare. She contributes regularly to the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times, and the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. She was previously a visiting fellow at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at Oxford University.Elbridge Colby is the director of the defense program at the Center for a New American Security. From May 2017 to July 2018, he served…

access_time1 min.
foreign policy

Ann McDaniel CEO, THE FP GROUP (INTERIM)Jonathan Tepperman EDITOR IN CHIEFMANAGING EDITOR Ravi AgrawalEXECUTIVE EDITOR, NEWS Dan EphronDEPUTY EDITORS Cameron Abadi, Sasha Polakow-Suransky, Kathryn Salam, Sarah WildmanSENIOR EDITOR James PalmerASSOCIATE EDITOR Benjamin SolowaySENIOR STAFF WRITERS Michael Hirsh, Keith Johnson, Colum LynchSTAFF WRITERS Robbie Gramer, Elias Groll, Amy Mackinnon, Lara SeligmanSOCIAL MEDIA & ENGAGEMENT EDITOR Colm QuinnFELLOWS Elizabeth Miles, Jefcoate O’DonnellART DIRECTOR Lori KelleyINTERACTIVES & EDITORIAL FEATURES DESIGNER C.K. HickeyCOPY CHIEF Shannon SchweitzerDEPUTY COPY EDITOR Nina GoldmanAndrew Sollinger PUBLISHERCHIEF PRODUCT OFFICER Adam GriffithsVICE PRESIDENT, EDUCATION/NONPROFIT SALES Keith ArendsVICE PRESIDENT, STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT Diana MarreroDIRECTOR OF STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT Susan SadigovaMARKETING DIRECTOR Robert VazquezDATA DIRECTOR Jason LeeADVERTISING AND STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE Dejana SaricMEDIA & MARKETING ASSOCIATE Caitlin ThompsonEVENTS DIRECTOR Veronika ZuboEVENTS ASSOCIATE Camille FordCHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Kent RenkDIRECTOR OF FINANCE James NelsonACCOUNTING COORDINATOR Asli…

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from the editor in chief

(CASSIDY DUHON)WHILE IT’S NOT QUITE TRUE that espionage has always been dominated by the professionals—the dozen spies Moses sent into Canaan (as told in Numbers 13) were definitely amateurs, as were Nathan Hale and Mata Hari—it’s certainly been the case since World War II. But that’s now changing. In the last decade or two, the expert nature of spycraft, like so many other parts of the field, has started to shift. Thanks to a bewildering mix of economic, social, political, and, most of all, technological changes, we have all become potential spooks—and targets. Just consider what those immensely powerful and heavily encrypted little computers we all carry around in our pockets are up to. Together with the advent of superfast 5G communications and the internet of things, smartphones make it…

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how to win the rat race

ALONG AN 18-MILE STRIP OF LAND between the Canadian province of Alberta and its neighbor Saskatchewan, the rat patrol keeps guard. An eight-person team, armed with poison and shotguns, hunts daily for any sign of the rodent invaders.The Alberta rat patrol checks more than 3,000 farms a year, but it rarely sees an actual rat. Alberta has 4.3 million people, 255,000 square miles, and no rats—bar the stray handful that make it into the killing zone each year. Ever since 1950, a sternly enforced program of exclusion and extermination has kept the province rat-free. Nowhere else in the world comes close; the only other rat-free areas are isolated islands such as the remote British territory of South Georgia.Public support and education have been key to Alberta’s success. Locals use hotlines…

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the case against frugal innovation

WHEN I WAS A CHILD GROWING UP IN KOLKATA, I could count on one hand the different types of cars chugging around the city’s streets. Each of the brands was made in India. In those years, which preceded the country’s 1991 economic reforms, global companies were still cut off from India’s then-nascent, protectionist economy. It was with some wonder, then, that I noticed what looked like a Mercedes-Benz sedan pull up by my school one day. But this was no luxury German car. On closer inspection, the strange vehicle was in fact the most common Indian sedan of the time but with an unusually sleek and elongated hood welded on and painted over to match the rest of the car’s body. As a finishing touch, atop the hood sat the…

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catching china by the belt (and road)

WILL THE DEVELOPING WORLD FALL UNDER CHINA’S SWAY? Many policymakers in Washington certainly fear so, which is one of the reasons they have created the new International Development Finance Corp. (IDFC), which is slated to begin operating at the end of this year. Like the Marshall Plan, which in the post-World War II years used generous economic aid to fight the appeal of Soviet communism in Western Europe, the IDFC aims to help Washington push back against Beijing’s sweeping Belt and Road Initiative.The new institution should allow the United States to better align its commercial and development goals with its foreign policy in the developing world. But the IDFC will start at a significant disadvantage: relative poverty. Whereas the new IDFC will have about $60 billion in capital, the Belt…

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