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Forks Over KnivesForks Over Knives

Forks Over Knives Summer 2019

Forks Over Knives, a feature film released in 2011, helped launch the concept of a whole-food, plant-based lifestyle as a path to vibrant health and wellness. The Summer 2019 issue of Forks Over Knives magazine offers fresh ideas for cooking with sweet corn, a healthy summer picnic menu, delicious bake-ahead breakfasts, tasty plant-based burgers and dogs, sweet and savory Vietnamese-style summer rolls, and easy 30-minute dinners; PLUS expert health and nutrition advice, a guide to choosing and storing summer’s best produce, tips for staying the plant-based course when your family isn’t on board, and inspiring real-life success stories.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Meredith Corporation
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IN THIS ISSUE

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hot days, cool eats

Summertime is peak fruit and vegetable season, which means a wide range of palate-pleasing fresh foods is waiting to be discovered at local grocery stores and farmers markets. This is the time of year when my partner, Forks Over Knives head chef Darshana Thacker, and I go all in on fruits like peaches, plums, strawberries, and nectarines. When it comes to vegetables, we’re all about fresh corn this time of year. Whether it’s corn on the cob, corn chowder, or corn with corn on top (too corny?), we can’t seem to get enough of this sweet and satisfying starchy vegetable. Since we know many of you feel the same way, this issue features “Sweet Corn” (page 40), a collection ofincredible recipes that includes Peach-Corn Caviar, Street Corn Pizza, Corn and Chickpea Cakes,…

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the fok diet explained

1 PUT STARCHES AND FRUITS AT THE CENTER OF YOUR PLATE. Enjoy nonstarchy and leafy veggies in generous amounts, but look to carbohydrate-rich whole grains, beans, fruits, and starchy vegetables to provide enough calories to get you through your day. 2 YOU’LL LIKELY EAT MORE FOOD, NOT LESS. Whole or minimally processed plant foods are dense in nutrients, not calories. As you adjust to this way ofeating, you may find you feel a little hungry shortly after a meal, but over time you’ll get a sense of how much to eat to stay satiated. 3 FOCUS ON PLEASURE. The best whole plant foods are the ones you enjoy enough to stay on a healthy path. So have veggie chili, whole grain pasta, tacos, mashed potatoes, or whatever else hits the spot. 4 SAY…

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forks over knives

FOUNDER & PRESIDENT Brian Wendel EDITOR IN CHIEF Elizabeth Turner CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Courtney Davison Mary Margaret Chappell MEREDITH SPECIAL INTEREST MEDIA PARTNERSHIPS EDITORIAL EDITORIAL CONTENT DIRECTOR Michelle Bilyeu ART DIRECTOR Nikki Sanders CONTRIBUTING DESIGN DIRECTOR Alexis West-Huntoon CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Shelli McConnell CONTRIBUTING COPY EDITOR Carrie Truesdell PROOFREADER Erika Bjorklund ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Lori Eggers PHOTOGRAPHERS Jason Donnelly, Carson Downing, Blaine Moats, Brie Passano CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER Adam Albright FOOD STYLISTS Kelsey Bulat, Greg Luna CONTRIBUTING FOOD STYLISTS Jennifer Peterson, Charlie Worthington CONTRIBUTING PROP STYLIST Alexis West-Huntoon EDITORIAL ADMINISTRATION ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR Jennifer Speer Ramundt SENIOR COPY EDITOR Erika Bjorklund BUSINESS MANAGER, EDITORIAL Cindy Slobaszewski DIRECTOR, QUALITY Joseph Kohler DIRECTOR, PHOTOGRAPHY Reese Strickland TEST KITCHEN DIRECTOR Lynn Blanchard ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, PRINT PREMEDIA Michael Sturtz DIRECTOR OF COLOR QUALITY Dale Tunender GROUP ADMINISTRATION VICE PRESIDENT/GROUP PUBLISHER Scott Mortimer EXECUTIVE ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Doug Stark VICE PRESIDENT/GROUP EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Stephen Orr ASSOCIATE BUSINESS DIRECTOR Jenna Bates BUSINESS MANAGERS Lisa Carlson, Marisa Clark PRODUCTION ASSOCIATE PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Patrick McGowan PRODUCTION MANAGER…

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contributors

Michelle McMacken, MD Dr. McMacken is a physician and assistant professor of medicine at NYU School of Medicine. She directs a medical weight loss program and teaches doctors in training at Bellevue Hospital Center in New York City. Karen Asp Karen is a journalist and author specializing in fitness, health, and nutrition. She writes for numerous publications, including Better Homes & Gardens, O, and Prevention, and recently published a book, Anti-Aging Hacks. Karen is also a fitness professional certified in plant-based nutrition and a world-record-holding athlete in Nordic walking. Darshana Thacker Darshana is chef and culinary projects manager for Forks Over Knives. A graduate of the Natural Gourmet Institute, Darshana is the author of the new Forks Over Knives: Flavor! cookbook, recipe author for Forks Over Knives Family, and recipe contributor to the New York…

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the feed

THE SCOOP ON PROTEIN Where do you get your protein? Plant-based eaters hear this question all the time. We’ve been led to believe that protein is hard to get, and that meat and dairy foods are superior sources of this important nutrient. Yet science shows that most of us already get more protein than we need. In 2013, the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics published the largest study to date comparing the nutrient intake of more than 71,000 non-vegetarians, vegetarians, and vegans. The average recommended intake for protein is 42 grams a day. Yet the study found that, on average, vegetarians and vegans get 70 percent more protein than they need every day (70-plus grams), while non-vegetarians get even more than that (almost 80 grams). “Contrary to popular perception, this excess protein…

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ingredient iq: aquafaba

Considered liquid gold by savvy plant-based cooks, aquafaba is the gooey liquid you see when you open a can of chickpeas. Its unique composition of starches and proteins makes it useful for thickening, binding, emulsifying, and foaming in recipes, especially baking recipes. Here’s what you need to know. GET IT Shake a can of chickpeas, open it up, and strain the liquid using a fine-mesh strainer. Voilà: aquafaba. (Expect ½ to ¾ cup aquafaba from a 15-oz. can of chickpeas.) STORE IT Keeps in the refrigerator for up to five days, or freeze it in handy ¼-cup or ½-cup portions for up to two months. EGG SWAP Try aquafaba in any recipe that calls for eggs: 3 Tbsp. aquafaba (whipped until frothy) replaces 1 egg; 2 Tbsp. replaces 1 egg white. MAKE WHIPPED “CREAM”…

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