EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Business & Finance
Fortune

Fortune January 1, 2018

FORTUNE covers the entire field of business, including specific companies and business trends, tech innovation prominent business leaders, and new ideas shaping the global marketplace. FORTUNE is particularly well known for its exceptionally reliable annual rankings of companies. FORTUNE furthers understanding of the economy, provides implementable business strategy, and gives you the practical knowledge you need to maximize your own success. Fortune currently publishes 3 double issues. Each count as two of 12 issues in an annual subscription.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Meredith Corporation
Frequency:
Monthly
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12 Issues

in this issue

3 min.
the quest for ‘just right’

FOR MY LAST BIRTHDAY, my wife gave me a spectacular present: a product so ingeniously made that every time I use it, I marvel at how marvelous it is. The item? A sturdy plastic shoehorn. Okay, I’ll admit it sounds workaday. But what makes this shoehorn special is its length—30 inches—which allows its 6-foot 3-inch owner to put on the snuggest of loafers without sitting or bending down. There’s even a curved edge to the handle that lets me hang the thing off the side of a bureau or closet door. In a word, it’s “intuitive”—which is about the highest compliment one can pay a product or service, whatever it may be. Yes, ever so rarely, a thingamajig or machine does what it’s supposed to do so exquisitely—so in sync with what…

2 min.
elliott offers a no-hedge response

IN THE ARTICLE titled “Whatever It Takes to Win” [Dec. 15], Fortune relayed several instances in which unnamed people allege that the adult children of various executives were contacted by individuals that they assumed to be working for Elliott Management. This assumption and the implicit allegations that Elliott sent anyone to contact the children of these executives are completely false. Elliott has always behaved ethically in its disputes with corporate managements and boards, and it is regrettable and disappointing that certain parties adverse to us would choose to promote false allegations about us rather than engage on the merits of our arguments in good faith. Elliott Management Corp. New York City EDITOR’S NOTE: During the reporting of this article, Fortune’s Jen Wieczner reached out to Elliott on at least seven occasions to ask for…

5 min.
i.o.u.s.a.

THE WORLD IN 8 PAGES DEBT EARLY LAST SUMMER, the National Debt Clock—a New York City fixture that has been tracking the U.S. government’s arrears since 1989—got sent, somewhat aptly, for a tune-up. By the time it had been returned to Midtown Manhattan, half a year later, the country had blown $687 billion further into the red and reached the historic $20 trillion mark. Indeed, America’s debt is mountainous and growing. What the federal government alone owes its creditors easily eclipses what the nation produced economically (our gross domestic product) in 2016. The nation’s debt-to-GDP ratio is as high as it’s been since World War II, and many independent experts say it’s poised to grow further under GOP tax plans. Federal Reserve chair Janet Yellen recently told Congress that the debt’s trajectory is…

2 min.
this app could be the future of tv (no, seriously)

MOST DAYS at 3 p.m. and 9 p.m. millennials across the country stop what they’re doing—be it work, dinner parties, or drinks—and tune into the twice-daily broadcast of HQ Trivia. The mobile app, a live 12-question game show, regularly draws about 400,000 players— more than half the daytime audience of CNN. That’s despite having virtually no social network, keeping user-generated content to a minimum, and being offline 98% of the day. HQ has seemingly defied every rule for mobile hitmaking, and yet increasingly, reviewers gush it just might be “the future of TV.” The app was built by the cofounders of Vine, the looping video service acquired (and later shuttered) by Twitter. Its charm lies in mining an addictive niche: trivia. Add to that the program’s gamification of live video, real money…

1 min.
jedi numbers

THE BUSINESS OF STARWARS Box office domination is only part of the galactic saga’s moneymaking strategy. $225M OPENING WEEKEND The Last Jedi blasted its way to the second-best domestic opening weekend in boxoffice history, behind only 2015’s The Force Awakens from the same series. $600M TOY SALES Estimated revenue between Dec. 2016 and Nov. 2017 from Star Wars toys, the hottest toy property during that period. (Expect sales to tick up while The Last Jedi is in theaters.) 735 DAYS* Time between The Last Jedi’s release and Dec. 20, 2019, when Episode IX finally hits theaters. * If you can’t wait that long, Solo: A Star Wars Story opens after 161 days.…

1 min.
what comes after net neutrality

In December the FCC voted to dismantle net neutrality, amove that (assuming it survives legal challenges) could allow telecoms to charge companies different rates for different Internet speeds. Will that destroy the Internet, as many tech pioneers claim, or pave the way for making it better? Depends on whom you ask. THE OPTIMIST TYLER COWEN ECONOMIST, AUTHOR “Bandwidth is scarce. If we’d like to have a future where you can do surgery over the Internet… we’re going to need more infrastructure. Charging for it is a good way to get it in place.” THE PESSIMIST MIGNON CLYBURN FCC COMMISSIONER “I dissent from this fiercely spun, legally lightweight, consumer-harming, corporate-enabling Destroying Internet Freedom Order.” TARGET: SCOTT GILBERTSON—COURTESY OF TARGET; CLYBURN: DANIEL ACKER—BLOOMBERG/GETTY IMAGES…