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Forme et Santé
Australian Men's Fitness

Australian Men's Fitness February 2020

Men's Fitness is your personal trainer, dietician, life coach and training partner in one package. It's about fitness of the mind and body. Covering fitness, health, nutrition, participation in sport, relationships, travel and men's fashion, the magazine drives its readers to be fitter, stronger, healthier and ultimately, happier.

Pays:
Australia
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Odysseus Publishing PTY Limited
Fréquence:
Monthly
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1 min.
the smart man’s cheat sheet

Know this Run for it • Running offers so many benefits: it makes your heart healthier, keeps your weight down and reduces your risk of things like diabetes and cancer. A study in the British Journal of Sports Medicine has found that runners have a 27% lower risk of dying of any cause compared to non-runners. But surprisingly, running more often doesn’t equal more benefits – the study found that running just once a week for 50 minutes is enough to do the trick. Eat this Tomato & whey • Probably not together, though… A study found that a combo of the antioxidant lycopene, found in tomatoes, and whey protein may improve sperm quality, and could be a way to reducing the impact that “modern living” has on sperm health. The amount used in the…

1 min.
crack shot

Two-time Dakar winner Toby Price is so keen on his protein, he’s made a short off-road adventure film about riding through the Aussie outback looking for fresh eggs. As well as showcasing Price’s incredible rally raid skills in his Mitsubishi Trophy Truck – the same he’ll be driving at the Baja 1000 – and his distinctive mullet, there’s also Aussie culture references galore, including a cameo from a very cute joey. Here, Price sails over a passing tractor during the opening scene of Cracked inKyogle, NSW, lastyear.…

1 min.
cold case

Pro athletes are known for using ice baths after competition, but new research has thrown a big bucket of ice-cold water on this recovery strategy. A study from the Netherlands has found that ice baths aren’t helpful for repairing and building muscle over time. The researchers studied the impact of ice baths on the generation of new protein in muscles, which usually increases after you exercise, and also after you eat protein. They measured this in a group of participants who did resistance exercises of both legs for two weeks. After every session, they immersed one leg in 8°C water. Results showed a decrease in the amount of protein generation in that leg. “Our research doesn’t discount cold-water immersion altogether,” says researcher Cas Fuchs, “but does suggest that if the athlete aims…

2 min.
training

Scull session When you hit the gym at rush hour, most of the cardio machines will be taken – ellipticals, treadmills and stationary bikes are all big faves for cardio bunnies. But what’s that over in the corner, quietly gathering dust? It’s your new best friend – the rower. A study by the English Institute of Sport has found that the humble rowing machine engages 86% of the muscles in the body – making it about three times as effective as cycling. The rower isn’t just about the upper body – it works your legs, back and core, as well as your arms. However, the research points out that in order to get the full benefits, you need to have proper technique. Love me tendon • The build-up of scar tissue makes recovery…

1 min.
word of mouth

When you think of elite athletes, you probably think of glowing good health. Just don’t look inside their mouths. It turns out elite athletes have high rates of oral disease, despite brushing their teeth more than most people, according to a study from University College London, UK. Why? Elite athletes also use sports drinks, energy gels and bars frequently during training and competition. The sugar in these products increases the risk of tooth decay and the acidity of them increases the risk of erosion.…

2 min.
health

Hide the sausage Ultra-processed foods might be oh-so-tasty and super convenient, but they’re also horribly bad for you. It’s not just because they can make you fat; they’ve also been linked to lower measures of heart health, say researchers at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They found that for every 5% increase in calories from ultra-processed foods a person ate, there was a corresponding decrease in overall cardiovascular health. Adults who ate 70% of their calories from ultra-processed foods were half as likely to have “ideal” cardiovascular health compared with people who ate 40% or less of their calories from ultra-processed foods. In good shape • Green spaces – outdoor areas like parks and ovals – have been found to improve local residents’ health. It makes sense – you get outdoors,…