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category_outlined / Film, Télé et Musique
Billboard MagazineBillboard Magazine

Billboard Magazine March 2, 2019

Written for music industry professionals and fans. Contents provide news, reviews and statistics for all genres of music, including radio play, music video, related internet activity and retail updates.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Prometheus Global Media
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29 Numéros

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access_time4 min.
cardi b and bruno mars team up for another top 10

AFTER “FINESSE” reached No. 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 in January 2018, Cardi B and Bruno Mars add their second shared hit, blasting in at No. 5 with “Please Me.” The song — a stand-alone single (“Finesse” was remixed with Cardi B after it was first released as a Mars solo track on his 2016 album, 24K Magic) — launches at No. 1 on the Digital Song Sales chart with 51,000 downloads sold, according to Nielsen Music. Mars adds his ninth No. 1 on the survey, while Cardi B collects her third. Ahead of the March 1 premiere of its official video, the track bows at No. 10 on the Streaming Songs list with 27.9 million U.S. streams and climbs 33-22 on Radio Songs (39 million in audience). As Mars earns his…

access_time4 min.
spotify, warner face off in india

WHEN SPOTIFY launched in India on Feb. 26 after years of planning, it did so without hits like Ed Sheeran’s “Perfect” and Cardi B’s “I Like It” because it wasn’t able to reach a licensing deal with the owner of those recordings, Warner Music Group (WMG). But it is offering Indian users songs that WMG publishes, such as Maroon 5’s “Girls Like You” and Beyoncé’s “Formation,” despite the company’s objections — setting a stage for a battle royale that could have significant international implications for Spotify’s relationships with the music industry and Wall Street, not to mention the future of copyright law in the world’s second-most populous country and beyond. On Feb. 25, WMG filed a request for an injunction to try to stop the inclusion of Warner/Chappell songs in Spotify’s impending…

access_time3 min.
the making of venezuela aid live

This past December, when Colombian businessman Bruno Ocampo was at Richard Branson’s Caribbean retreat, the two men were discussing their shared passion for philanthropy over games of chess when talk turned to Venezuela, its human rights issues and its diaspora (during which 3 million people fled the country). “Six weeks later,” says Ocampo, “he wrote me an email and asked how we could help.” Ocampo reached Venezuelan opposition leader and self-declared president Juan Gauidó, and on Jan. 30, the two were on a video call with Branson and another opposition leader, Leopoldo López. One suggested a Live Aid-style concert to raise money and awareness of the humanitarian crisis, including the foreign aid that Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro blocked from the country. Three weeks later, on Feb. 22, 32 artists, including superstars Maná,…

access_time3 min.
eu-tube battle nears final parliament vote

Late in the evening of Feb. 13, European Union policymakers hammered out the final version of the new Copyright Directive — the subject of a fierce four-year battle between media businesses and tech giants like Google over how creators will be compensated in the digital age. At stake are billions of dollars in potential revenue for the music industry, as well as the future of the online media business in the world’s largest market. By early April, European Parliament will vote on whether the Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market will take effect — after which it would then be transposed into law in member states. The most important provision to the music business — and the most controversial generally — is Article 13, which would essentially end the legal…

access_time2 min.
now in u.s. stores: k-pop

Entertainment retailer Trans World Entertainment has signed a deal to report sales of its K-pop titles to Korean chart company Hanteo. And as part of that arrangement, the Albany, N.Y.-based chain is creating a K-pop section in each of its 210 U.S. stores and its websites, where it will sell music, clothing, accessories and collectibles. “We continue to look for opportunities to provide our customers with collaborative merchandise in stores and online, and K-pop is one of those opportunities,” said Trans World CEO Michael Feurer in a statement. “We are excited about giving K-pop fans in the United States the opportunity to help their favorite group rise on the Hanteo Chart.” In a South Korean market dominated by charts-based music TV shows, those domestic tallies take on added value for fans and…

access_time6 min.
paul thompson

I COULDN’T TAKE IT ANYMORE,” recalls Paul Thompson, explaining why he fled his cubicle job as a Silicon Valley headhunter in 2013 to teach English in South Korea. It was a country he knew nothing about, except that it offered good-paying teaching gigs that required only an English degree, which he had earned at the University of San Diego. Seven years later, the 31-year-old Stockton, Calif., native has attained unlikely status in Seoul: the only non-Korean ever to be signed as an in-house songwriter by K-pop giant JYP Entertainment, home of boy band BTS. And after running an equally rare three-year joint publishing venture with another Korean juggernaut, SM Entertainment (Girls’ Generation, EXO), Thompson is now growing his own MARZ Music Group, funneling K-pop tunes crafted by his stable of young,…

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