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Classic TrainsClassic Trains

Classic Trains

September 2019

CELEBRATE THE GOLDEN AGE OF AMERICAN RAILROADING – WHEN GIANT STEAM LOCOMOTIVES, COLORFUL DIESELS AND STEAMLINERS SHARED THE RAILS. CLASSIC TRAINS COVERS THE 1930’S THROUGH THE 1970’S WITH REMARKABLE PHOTOGRAPHY, DETAILED REPORTING AND FIRST-HAND ACCOUNTS FROM PEOPLE WHO WORKED THE GREAT PASSENGER AND FREIGHT TRAINS.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
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access_time2 min.
steam’s last great year

Three-quarters of a century ago, a world war was placing unprecedented demands on the railroads of the United States and Canada. A tidal wave of traffic was taxing employees, facilities, and equipment. The carriers urgently needed more locomotives. By 1944, Electro-Motive’s E and FT units had convinced many railroads of the superiority of diesel power. But wartime restrictions on industrial production curtailed the availability of diesels, forcing some roads that might have preferred them to settle for steam. Other railroads, still committed to the fire-plus-water equation, added to their fleets with the expectation that steam would reign for decades to come. So pressing was the need for basic, proven power, that government regulators discouraged the time-intensive development of new steam designs, as well as the construction of purely passenger power. It…

access_time1 min.
classic trains

Editor Robert S. McGonigal Senior Art Director Lisa A. Bergman Associate Editor Brian Schmidt Contributing Editor J. David Ingles Editorial Assistant Diane Laska-Swanke Graphic Designer Lisa M. Schroeder Lead Illustrator Rick Johnson Contributing Illustrator Bill Metzger Librarian Thomas E. Hoffmann Columnist Kevin P. Keefe Editorial Director Diane M. Bacha Kalmbach Media Chief Executive Officer Dan Hickey Senior Vice President, Finance Christine Metcalf Vice President, Content Stephen C. George Vice President, Consumer Marketing Nicole McGuire Vice President, Operations Brian J. Schmidt Vice President, Human Resources Sarah A. Horner Senior Director, Advertising Sales & Events David T. Sherman Advertising Sales Director Scott Redmond Circulation Director Liz Runyon Director of Design & Production Michael Soliday New Business Manager Cathy Daniels Retention Manager Kathy Steele Single Copy Specialist Kim Redmond…

access_time3 min.
head end

Big Boy’s big comeback The impossible dream of generations of railfans came true in early May when a 4-8-8-4 Big Boy steamed for the first time since 1959. Union Pacific’s Cheyenne, Wyo.-based steam crew completed the job just in time for No. 4014 to depart on May 4, with 4-8-4 844, on a five-day trek to Ogden, Utah, where the two engines starred in a “Spike 150” ceremony. The pair returned to Cheyenne May 19, then 4014 began a Midwest tour July 15. The engines made a breathtaking sight at Granger, Wyo., just after sunrise May 6. The “final answer” in diesel design? In May 1960 Trains, Editor David P. Morgan, reflecting on the evolution of diesel locomotive design as road-switchers with low noses were coming into vogue, wondered if the “final answer…

access_time2 min.
reviews

American Steam Locomotives: Design and Development, 1880–1960 By William L. Withuhn. Indiana University Press, Bloomington, Ind. 452 pages, $40. Deep in the diesel era, 2019 is high time for a book that steps back from the glassy-eyed volumes on steam locomotives and truly puts engines into context for their times. The late Smithsonian transportation curator, Bill Withuhn, left us with a magnificent book that illuminates the American steam story in a readable fashion that will please those whose steam IQ ranges from novice to expert and in between. Withuhn, for example, compares and contrasts the Union Pacific Big Boy and the Chesapeake & Ohio Allegheny in an engaging way. With some of steam’s greatest stars active or about to be, here’s a book that puts each in its place and time. —…

access_time7 min.
archive treasures treasured

I am delighted to see the excellent feature on photos by my favorite anthracite roads photographer, Donald W. Furler [“Archive Treasures: Quiet Monsters Coming to Life,” page 16]. I hope you enjoy a Lehigh Valley picture I took in 1973 at almost the same spot as Furler’s Central of New Jersey shot on page 4. The most obvious change is that the imposing Lehigh & New England bridge is gone, removed in 1967. The LV train is running on ex-CNJ trackage eastbound behind three GP18s as the CNJ pulled out of Pennsylvania in 1972. No doubt the eastbound has work in the yard at Allentown, otherwise it would be using the original LV main on the opposite side of the river. The highway shown in the 1946 photo through the Lehigh…

access_time1 min.
fts for the fast mail

From the new book Classic Railroad Scenes, available from KalmbachHobbyStore.com The Santa Fe was an early and ardent buyer of Electro-Motive’s E units, receiving E1s, E3s, and E6s. The road was also the first to go for EMD’s FT, ordering 320 A and B units in the early 1940s to haul freights over its dry, heavily graded main line through Arizona and California. In mid-1945 the road began trying FTs on varnish — and never bought another E unit. In this December 3, 1946, view, four-unit FT set No. 168 leads train 7, the Chicago–Los Angeles Fast Mail, at Newton, Kans. Delivered in May 1945, the 168 was converted for passenger work in mid-1946, then reverted to freight duty at the end of 1951 as F3 and F7s took over ontheSuper…

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