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Classic Trains

Classic Trains

Spring 2021
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CELEBRATE THE GOLDEN AGE OF AMERICAN RAILROADING – WHEN GIANT STEAM LOCOMOTIVES, COLORFUL DIESELS AND STEAMLINERS SHARED THE RAILS. CLASSIC TRAINS COVERS THE 1930’S THROUGH THE 1970’S WITH REMARKABLE PHOTOGRAPHY, DETAILED REPORTING AND FIRST-HAND ACCOUNTS FROM PEOPLE WHO WORKED THE GREAT PASSENGER AND FREIGHT TRAINS.

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Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
Fréquence:
Quarterly
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1 min.
south of the border, the show went on

In the latest installment of our “Archive Treasures” series, featuring holdings from the Center for Railroad Photography & Art’s collection [page 42], we spotlight images created by the late Ted Rose. Although Rose is best known as the premiere railroad-subject watercolorist of the late 20th century, the pictures in this issue are photographs, not paintings. Like many rail enthusiasts, Rose pursued his passion with a camera. And like so many of his generation, he loved steam locomotives — but by the time he was in a position to seek them out, they had all but disappeared from the United States and Canada. Which — in a North American context — left Mexico, where hundreds of engines remained active into the 1960s, handling all classes of traffic, day in and day out.…

2 min.
head end

Peter Kennedy, Scott Kennedy collection…

2 min.
reviews

Logomotive: Railroad Graphics and the American Dream By Ian Logan and Jonathan Glancey. Sheldrake Press, London, U.K. 272 pages.£35. For decades, the public design space was largely the province of railroads, as shown in this compendium of logos, paint schemes, and advertising themes of American and Canadian carriers. The authors bring a decidedly British sense to this subject. Much of Logo-motive is dedicated to exploring the heralds that have enlivened the railroad scene since the late 19th century: iterations of PRR’s keystone, B&O’s Capitol silhouette, UP’s shield, GN’s goat, Seaboard’s heart, plus some obscure ones, displayed on everything from diesels to billboards to matchbooks. They include an appraisal of the McGinnis-era New Haven logo and the evolution of CN’s “noodle.” The horizontal format boasts sharp color printing, heavy paper, and a durable…

1 min.
new from kalmbach

UNION PACIFIC’S BIG BOYS The most famous family of steam locomotives stars in Union Pacific’s Big Boys: The Complete Story from History to Restoration. Available in hard- and softcover format, the 224-page book features 78 pages on No. 4014’s rebirth and tours. THE MODEL RAIL-ROADER’S GUIDE TO IRON ORE RAILROADS The tough task of moving the prime ingredient of steel demands the brawny rail operations spotlighted in the 112 pages of The Model Railroader’s Guide to Iron Ore Railroads. Order both books at KalmbachHobbyStore.com or by calling (877) 243-4904.…

1 min.
obituaries

John W. “Jack” Barriger IV, 93, died November 20, 2020, in Kenilworth, Ill. The son of legendary railroad executive and theorist John W. Barriger III, he made his own mark on the rail industry. The younger Barriger spent 38 years with the Santa Fe, retiring in 1988 as vice president and assistant to the chairman. A champion of railroad history, he, along with his late brother Stanley, established the John W. Barriger III National Railroad Library, now at the University of Missouri-St. Louis [page 104, Spring 2020 Classic Trains]. Barriger wrote about the Santa Fe’s decision to join Amtrak in our Summer 2011 issue. Stewart Michael “Mike” Condren, a retired chemistry professor, died November 21 at age 78 in Tahlequah, Okla. Raised in Van Buren, Ark., he was an authority on…

9 min.
lower lakes and their ports

Really enjoyed the story about the car ferries [“Rails Across the Lower Lakes,” page 16] — until I tried to correlate what the story was saying with what the map was showing. Then I realized that the lake names were backward. Further checking revealed that the Canadian port names were reversed also. I really enjoy the magazine and have been a subscriber from the beginning. John Wallrich, Anchorage, Alaska ¶ In addition to what Mr. Wallrich points out, the name of Cobourg was misspelled. We received more comments about that map than any other single topic in Classic Trains’ history. Above is a corrected version. — R.S.M. “And farther below, Lake Ontario takes in what Lake Erie can send her.” — Gordon Lightfoot, 1975 Les Foran, Ogallala, Nebr. I read with interest the article on the…