Country Life

Country Life 14-Apr-2021

Published by TI Media Limited Country Life, the quintessential English magazine, is undoubtedly one of the biggest and instantly recognisable brands in the UK today. It has a unique core mix of contemporary country-related editorial and top end property advertising. Editorially, the magazine comments in-depth on a wide variety of subjects, such as architecture, the arts, gardens and gardening, travel, the countryside, field-sports and wildlife. With renowned columnists and superb photography Country Life delivers the very best of British life every week.

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Pays:
United Kingdom
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Future Publishing Ltd
Fréquence:
Weekly
4,76 €(TVA Incluse)
148,67 €(TVA Incluse)
51 Numéros

dans ce numéro

1 min
horticultural black book

Garden design James Scott of The Garden Company (01442 832666; www.thegardenco.co.uk) Landscaping The Garden Company (01442 832666; www.thegardenco.co.uk) Riven Yorkstone paving Reclaimed from the garden Greenhouse Griffin Glasshouses (01962 772512; www.griffinglasshouses.com) Swimming pool The Garden Company and Stephen Langley of Millennium Pools (07979 804994) Rusted-steel edging T. Brown and Sons (07825 925257; www.tbrownandsons.co.uk) Fountain and sculpture David Harber (01235 859300; www.davidharber.co.uk) Sawn sandstone and natural rock Rand and Asquith (01484 719263; www.randandasquith.co.uk)…

1 min
life and times

1878 Lionel Dalhousie Robertson is born on November 9 to Dr James and Harriet Edwards 1895 Attends The Heatherley School of Fine Art and Frank Calderon's School of Animal Painting in London 1898 Elected to the London Sketch Club, the youngest member at 20, joining Cecil Aldin 1905 Exhibits at Graves's Gallery, Pall Mall. Marries Ethel Ashness Wells; they have five children, Marjorie (b. 1908), Derrick (1910), Philip (1914), Lindsay (1917) and Kenneth (1919) 1915 Posted to the Romsey Remount Depot, Hampshire 1919 Moves to Buckholt, Hampshire, his home for the rest of his life. On February 26, he notes in his diary that he despatched an astonishing ‘4 pencil sketches of the Hursley. 4 originals “The Seasons” (for Buick Cars), 1 poster Aintree biscuits and 4 pen sketches for motor book. Sent rough sketches…

1 min
pick of the week

The one fair that I got to after March last year was the postponed Petworth Park event in West Sussex, which took place in beautiful September weather. We should not have to wait a full year for the next incarnation, as it returns to its marquee on May – (www.petworthparkfair.com), among them first-timers from September, such as Timothy Millett with historical medals and Jenna Burlingham with Modern British artists. Christopher Clarke of Stow-on-the-Wold will make a first appearance, bringing campaign furniture and equipment, including an intriguing rarity-if not already sold in the gallery's current online exhibition (www.campaignfurniture.com). This is a collapsible paper travel lantern (above) with hardwood, perhaps hawthorn or apple, top and base. The treen authority Edward Pinto wrote that ‘Survivals are extremely rare, understandably as they must have…

4 min
what it all boils down to

AS ashamed as I am to admit it, the entire island of Jersey—birthplace of Lillie Langtry, home-in-exile of Charles II and Victor Hugo, festival haven and home to more than 100,000 residents—can be summed up in three words: cows and potatoes. Yes, I know, I know; I’m an ill-informed idiot with fodder for brains and nothing but lunch on his mind. However, I really don’t mean to be rude, but rather to offer the highest compliment. For this Channel isle has not only given us a magnificent, world-conquering mooer—renowned for the lush richness of its milk—but some of the very finest tubers on earth, too. I’ve never actually been to Jersey. More fool me. A British Crown Dependency and part of the British Isles, rather than Great Britain or the United…

1 min
bad week for

Raptors eating fast food A red kite has been spotted flying over Suffolk with a McDonald's cup in its talons, triggering concerns about the effect littering is having on wildlife Up a creek without a paddle A man who broke lock-down rules to go kayaking in Scotland was stranded on a Loch Lomond island after he lost his paddle Dolphins As people increasingly head towards the beach, the charity Whale & Dolphin Conservation has warned that pursuits such as jet-skiing or paddle-boarding may frighten or even injure dolphins Sporting guns After Defra announced a two-year consultation on banning lead ammunition (COUNTRY LIFE, March 31), the National Game Dealers Association declared that it will stop accepting lead-shot game from July 2022…

1 min
100 years ago in country life april 16, 1921

BEING a lover of primroses, I have planted great numbers in my Devonshire garden. Owing to the mild and early spring, many flowered in February; but every morning, to my disgust, I find dozens of flowers nipped off and strewn along the paths. At first I attributed the mischief to sparrows, but I soon came to the conclusion that some other kind of bird must be responsible. Eventually the crime was brought home to a pair of blackbirds, and after they had been disposed of, the primroses were allowed to bloom in safety. It is difficult to understand why primroses should be picked off in this way: the stem is nipped close up to the flower, and no part is ever eaten. Smaller birds eat the petals of both primroses…