Eat Well

Issue #39 2021

A sexy Recipe Mag that has a healthy approach to good food. Taste every page as you flick through – delicious! Why bother? Because everything in here is good for you, easy, and yum. We know you are busy so we give you everything you need to eat well – recipes, shopping lists, quick ideas. You’re tapping in to a heap of wisdom from passionate chefs, bloggers and caring home cooks. You can share yours too – we’re a community. Life’s short…. outsource your food plan to people who love healthy good food. If you stopped buying recipe mags years ago because they’re full of things you can’t eat – then try Eat Well! Over 70 recipes per edition. Purchase includes the Digital Edition and News Service. Please stay in touch via our Facebook Page.

Pays:
Australia
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Universal Wellbeing PTY Limited
Fréquence:
Bimonthly
1,96 €(TVA Incluse)
7,84 €(TVA Incluse)
6 Numéros

dans ce numéro

3 min
from the editor

If nothing else, COVID-19 has been a valuable learning experience. We have learned how to look at ourselves in the mirror with a rampant head of unclipped hair and maintain a sense of dignity and self-love. We have mastered a hitherto unseen facial expression for Zoom business calls that lies somewhere between sub-lethal boredom and wry amusement. We have discovered that the word “binge” can be applied to any aspect of life, and that cotton, polyester and elastic combine to make very forgiving clothing. Among these lessons, there has also been plenty revealed about our food supply. COVID has sparked fears around food supply worldwide, but among those fears there are green shoots of hope for our food future. It has to be said that Australia has a highly secure food supply. The…

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8 min
our chefs

Lee Holmes Lee Holmes’ food philosophy is all about S.O.L.E. food: sustainable, organic, local and ethical. Her main goal is to alter the perception that cooking fresh, wholesome, nutrient-rich meals is diffi cult, complicated and time-consuming. Lee says, “The best feeling I get is when I create a recipe using interesting, nourishing ingredients and it knocks my socks off. Then I can’t wait to share it with my community and hear their experiences.” After being diagnosed with a crippling autoimmune disease in 2006, Lee travelled the world discovering foods that could be used to heal her body at a cellular level. After fi nding many nutrient-rich and anti-inflammatory foods and changing her diet, Lee recovered. Her mind alive with ideas for new recipes, she wanted to share her creations with the world, so…

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1 min
coconut

Coconuts started life in India but, thanks to their capacity to float on water and survive massive ocean journeys, they have made their way around the world. To use your coconut, punch out the eyes using a screwdriver and a hammer, then drain the liquid inside, which can be enjoyed as a drink or for cooking. To facilitate removal of the coconut flesh, bake it in a 180ºC oven for 20 mins, allow it to cool, then crack it. You can eat the flesh as is or grated in salads, curries or soups. The freshly grated version is much sweeter than the dried version, but both make delicious additions to biscuits, cakes and other desserts.…

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3 min
mint

Mint has been a popular herb with humans since at least Roman times. Its first use was probably for its odour, which is very pleasant. The Romans would strew fresh leaves on the floor of rooms to freshen them and also repel pests such as mice. In addition to being pleasing, the aroma of mint has healing effects on the airways, digestion and the mind. Taken internally, mint has distinct medicinal effects as we will see later, but it was the Romans who first really embraced the culinary possibilities that mint offers, probably beginning with a nice mint sauce. There are more than 600 varieties of mint but by far the most common are spearmint (Mentha cardiaca) and peppermint (Mentha x piperita). Peppermint has rounded leaves with sharp-toothed edges and an…

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5 min
5 appetite - crushing foods

Avocado Avocados are a fabulous source of healthy monounsaturated fats that are essential for good health, including healthy cardiovascular function. Fats also have a positive effect on appetite and satiety. When fats enter the stomach, they stimulate the release of a hormone called cholecystokinin, which suppresses appetite and delays stomach emptying. This is one of the reasons why consuming avocados with a meal will help you feel full for longer. Avocados contain beneficial oleic fatty acids which have been found to reduce hunger and food intake. Avocados also provide plenty of dietary fi bre that further increases the satiating effect of this delicious fruit. A study published in Nutrition Journal found that overweight adults who added half an avocado to their lunch had an increase in satisfaction and decreased desire to eat.…

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18 min
mediterranean christmas meals

Mezze Party Platter Recipe / Naomi Sherman Mezze, meaning appetiser or small plate, is the perfect fuss-free way to feed a crowd. Mix it up by using your favourite flavours and textures, or follow my guide exactly. Serves: 10 Greek Eggplant Dip 180g marinated chargrilled eggplant, including marinade1 tsp minced garlic1 tbsp breadcrumbs2 tbsp parsley, fi nely choppedOlive oil Tzatziki 1 cup grated cucumber, squeezed well to remove juice1 cup Greek yoghurtZest & juice ½ lemon1 clove garlic, minced½ tsp salt1 tsp chopped parsley1 tbsp chopped dill Platter 1 cup tabbouleh10 dolmades, fresh or tinned440g marinated artichokes, halved250g baby cucumbers, cut into spears250g cherry tomatoes4 pita breads, lightly toasted & cut into wedges110g olives, mixed200g feta, cubedDried fruit (optional)Fresh herbs, to serve (optional) 1. Place the eggplant dip ingredients into a small food processor and pulse until just combined. The…

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