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Voyages et Plein air
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March 2020

South Africa’s number one travel and outdoor lifestyle magazine. We pay our own way and tell it like it is. We drive back roads and speak to real people, giving you practical information about affordable destinations in southern Africa. Each issue is crammed with excellent photography, honest gear reviews and delicious recipes to make at home or in the bundu. Whether you’re looking to escape for a weekend or a month, your journey starts here.

Pays:
South Africa
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Media 24 Ltd
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12 Numéros

Dans ce numéro

2 min.
in praise of print

Are you young – or old – enough (it’s all relative) to remember the song “Video Killed the Radio Star” by The Buggles? In 1980, it was a favourite at the school dances that were held every Friday night in the Boy Scout Hall in my home town. At the time, the song was a nostalgic lamentation of the uncontrolled pace of technological innovation, but it turns out The Buggles needn’t have worried. Forty years later, radio is alive and flourishing while VHS and Betamax will never be exhumed. It’s the same with books. I recently read that book sales worldwide are increasing, specifically printed books. In 2018 in the USA, book sales generated $26 billion in revenue. The sale of digital books only made up 10% of that figure. There’s place…

2 min.
behind the scenes

Where did you hear about the hike? I was baited to run the Grand Raid ultra-marathon on the island years ago. Parts of that crazy 162 km race crisscrossed sections of the GR R1 trail. At the time, I felt that I’d missed a lot of the island’s sights. When you’re running – especially when you’re running at night as we were required to do during some of the longer stretches – you don’t get much time to take in your surroundings. This trip was about going back to “smell the roses”. What was the highlight? On the day we climbed Piton des Neiges, we woke early to reach the summit by sunrise. The views from the island’s highest peak were incredible. At 3 070 m in altitude, it’s also the highest…

1 min.
go!

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF (WEG & GO): PIERRE STEYN editor@gomag.co.za DEPUTY EDITOR: ESMA MARNEWICK TRAVEL EDITOR: TOAST COETZER FOOD EDITOR: JOHANÉ NEILSON COPY EDITORS: MARIJCKE DODDS, MARTINETTE LOUW PICTURE EDITOR: SHELLEY CHRISTIANS JOURNALISTS: SOPHIA VAN TAAK, KYRA TARR ART DIRECTOR: LYNNE FRASER DESIGNER: ASHWELL PRINS CARTOGRAPHER: FRANÇOIS HAASBROEK WEB EDITOR: MARCELLE VAN NIEKERK CONTRIBUTORS: JON MINSTER, ERNS GRUNDLING CEO MEDIA24: ISHMET DAVIDSON CEO PRINT MEDIA: RIKA SWART GENERAL MANAGER – LIFESTYLE: MINETTE FERREIRA CMO MEDIA24 LIFESTYLE: NERISA COETZEE PRODUCTION MANAGER: KERRY NASH FINANCIAL MANAGER: JAMEELAH CONWAY CIRCULATION MANAGER: RIAAN WEYERS riaan.weyers@media24.com BUSINESS MANAGER – SALES: DANIE NELL danie.nell@media24.com MEDIA24 LIFESTYLE CREATE STUDIO CREATIVE DIRECTOR: MICHAEL DE BEER 021 406 3512 COMMERCIAL MANAGING EDITOR: GERDA ENGELBRECHT 021 406 2217 MEDIA24 LIVE HEAD OF EVENTS: FRANCOIS MALAN 021 406 2376 HEAD OF SPONSORSHIPS: NIKKI RUTTIMANN 011 713 9147 MARKETING MANAGER: ANDILE NKOSI 021 406 2257 ADVERTISING SALES JOHANNESBURG JEANINE KRUGER 082 342 2299 jeanine.kruger@media24.com LIZEL PAUW 082 876 8189 lizel.kok@media24.com SHARLENE SMITH 083 583 1604 sharlene.smith@media24.com THEA…

1 min.
chameleon crèche

Last December, my wife Maria and I camped at Olifants River Lodge between Witbank and Middelburg for a few days. We went for a walk next to the river one morning. On our walk, my wife’s sharp eye picked out a little flap-necked chameleon on the ground. We looked closely and saw several other babies in the plants – I counted about 10. According to the owner of the lodge, the chameleons had just hatched. What a thrill! LEON PRINSLOO, Boksburg Reptile expert JOHAN MARAIS says: This is a relatively common occurrence – chameleons reproduce annually and naturally occur in many ecosystems, including suburban gardens. A dwarf chameleon gives birth to live young, but a flap-necked chameleon lays eggs. The female digs a hole in the ground with her front legs and…

5 min.
letters

Pretty in pink My husband Marco and I recently did a camping tour of Botswana. We were the only people at Nata Bird Sanctuary on Sua Pan – part of the greater Makgadikgadi Pans network. Camping facilities were basic, but we’re Zimbos so we always make a plan. It was our third time visiting the reserve: Not only did we see flamingos on the pan for the first time, but also many other bird species as well as wildebeest and zebra. There was rain in the air and the sky was gorgeous – we even saw a double rainbow. (Maybe that’s why we were so lucky!) LUCINA FACCIO, Harare Lekker lake Kenmo Lake is a picturesque spot on a private farm just outside Himeville in KZN. The owners have very generously granted access to the…

2 min.
q & a

Definitely not Nemo Q SEBASTIAN SCHWABE (9) from Paarl writes: I recently found about seven of these interesting sea creatures washed up on the beach at Hartenbos. What is it? A Marine expert GUIDO ZSILAVECZ says: This is a sea swallow, a type of sea slug. It floats upside down, just below the surface – what you can see here is actually the “underside” of the animal. It’s relatively rare to see one washed up on the beach. They’re an offshore species and only occasionally get blown into tidal pools or onto the beach. The sea swallow is a specialised predator of bluebottles. It’s immune to their stings and actually ingests the stinging cells, which is uses it for its own defences. You can get stung if you pick one up, just like with…