Jeunesse
National Geographic Kids

National Geographic Kids December 2019/January 2020

National Geographic Kids magazine - the perfect balance between learning and fun! A must-have for children ages 6 and up. Each issue is packed with colorful photos, games, puzzles, fun features and facts about animals, science, technology, and more.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
National Geographic Society
Lire plus
J'ACHÈTE CE NUMÉRO
3,72 €(TVA Incluse)
JE M'ABONNE
18,63 €(TVA Incluse)
10 Numéros

dans ce numéro

1 min.
guinness world records

GIANT WAGON Santa would need a lot of elves to fill this wagon with presents. At 26 feet long and 11 feet tall, this whopper of a wagon weighs 15,000 pounds—the world’s largest toy wagon. (That’s about the weight of 15 grand pianos.) It can carry 75 kids—and we’re guessing it would need more than nine reindeer to pull it! COOL CAR FLIP! Buckle up: Stunt driver Terry Grant holds the record for farthest barrel roll in a car, flipping his vehicle 270 degrees off a ramp to land safely 50 feet from where he started. Grant practiced the jaw-dropping trick for six months before performing in front of an audience at a convention center in London, England. That’s quite a road show. VERY IMPORTANT SHEEP This soldier preferred to graze in the gardens instead…

1 min.
all about money

MONEY TIP! KEEP A MONEY DIARY. WRITING DOWN WHAT YOU SPEND WILL HELP YOU SEE WHAT YOUR SPENDING HABITS ARE—AND SHOW YOU WHERE YOU MIGHT BE ABLE TO SAVE. BERTRAND DEMEE / GETTY IMAGES (DOLLAR BILLS); NATALIYA EVMENENKO / DREAMSTIME (TEA SET); WESTEND61 GMBH / ALAMY (KRONER); COMSTOCK / GETTY IMAGES (THIEF), © LJSPHOTOGRAPHY / ALAMY (MONEY BAGS), IMAGE DIGITALLY COMPOSED; © THE TRUSTEES OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM (HORSE); D. HURST / ALAMY (BACON); NINETTE MAUMUS / ALAMY (GOLD); MIROSLAV STIMAC / SHUTTERSTOCK (MOON); HERITAGE AUCTIONS (PENNY); KELLEY MILLER / NG STAFF (PIGGY BANK)…

2 min.
amazing animals

Penguins Snap “Selfies” Mac. Robertson Land, Antarctica Lights, camera, squawk-tion! When a worker left a video camera filming on the ice, two emperor penguins decided it was their turn to be movie stars. One penguin waddled up to the camera and kicked it over so it faced the sky. Then the penguin stared into the lens as another bird shuffled into the frame. The two flaunted their feathers, presented close-ups of their beaks and eyes, then ended with a head-shaking finale. “Emperor penguins know their colony grounds very well, and they’re curious about anything that wasn’t there before,” says Barbara Wienecke, a senior research scientist with the Australian Antarctic Division. And what was up with the funny shaking? Wienecke says it was probably done to clear salt water out of their nostrils. These penguins…

7 min.
polar bear day care

HOW THESE ADORABLE CUBS LEARN TO LIVE ON THE ICE BY SCOTT ELDER Two tiny polar bear cubs poke their heads out of a hole and scan the snowy Arctic landscape. It’s quiet except for their little squeals, urging their mom to join them outside the den. They watch excitedly as the much larger female appears behind them. The mother polar bear stands tall on her hind legs, towering above her twins. She scans the horizon for possible threats. The cubs probably don’t understand that the Arctic can be dangerous for them, even though adult polar bears—the largest land carnivores on Earth—have no natural predators. What they do know is that their mom’s grunt means it’s safe to emerge from the family’s igloo-like winter den. After their eyes adjust to the sunlight, the pair…

2 min.
family reunion

A MOTHER POLAR BEAR MUST FIND HER LOST CUB. A polar bear mom and her one-year-old cub are crossing an icy cliff near Baffin Island, Canada. The curious youngster wanders off to explore—but panics when it loses sight of its mother and becomes trapped at the bottom of the ice wall. Hearing a radio report of the situation, wildlife photographer Paul Goldstein snowmobiles to the scene to capture the drama from a distance. 1 SEPARATED “When I got to the scene, I could see only the mother at the top of the ice,” says Goldstein, who’s been photographing animals for almost 30 years. “After a few minutes, I finally located the youngster at the bottom of an 80-foot ice cliff on the opposite side of the ice.” The one-year-old cub, called a yearling,…

2 min.
brain games

Your brain is responsible for all your thoughts and actions. But even though it’s smarter than the most powerful computer, your thinker can still be fooled. Check out the science behind these tricky brain benders. RAIL TRACK ILLUSION Take a look at these railway tracks. Which of the two red rectangles is larger? BEHIND THE BRAIN Both of the red rectangles are actually the same width and height! Your brain “sees” the image as a realistic 3D scene, in which things look smaller as they get farther away. So your brain interprets the flat, 2D upper rectangle as if it’s 3D and compares its size against the smaller tracks—which makes it seem bigger than the bottom rectangle. DOING THE WAVE Slowly move your eyes around this picture. Does it look like the diagonal rows of shapes…